TABER

Taber is a servant to Sir Harry in Thomas Heywood's The Wise Woman of Hogsdon. He and Cicely consult the Wise-Woman of Hogsdon. Taber asks whether he and Cicely are fated to be together, but nothing more is made of this relationship in the play. Although he appears on stage quite often and has a substantial number of lines, Taber's presence in the play does not directly impact the plot. Instead, his main role appears to be to deliver clever dialogue while otherwise performing conventional servant duties, such as escorting guests in and out of Sir Harry's house.

TABISHA

Tabisha is Sir William's second daughter in Armin's The Two Maids of More–Clacke. Together with Mary, she seeks for the glove. Tabisha wants to marry Filbon who sends her a letter through Tutch. She proves her loyalty to her beloved Filbon rejecting the love proposals of Tutch and the Auditor. She finally marries Filbon in front of Sir Rafe who accepts her as his daughter.

TABORER

The Taborer in Shakespeare's Two Noble Kinsmen, called Timothy, serves as musician for the morris-dancers in the wood.

TABOURER**1618

A non-speaking part in Holiday's Technogamia. The Tabourer enters with the Hobby horse for the Morris entertainment performed by Musica and the four humor characters.

TABRER, TOM

Tom Tabrer is a minstrel in Munday's John a Kent and John a Cumber. He plays the fiddle in the troupe of amateur actors who are to entertain the lords on the night before their wedding. The actors debate which of them should deliver the welcoming speech, and Tom acts as a mediator. Weighing Hugh's rhetorical qualities against Turnop's familiarity with the lords, Tom changes the odds to Turnop's favor and all vote with him. Tom provides the musical accompaniment to the dumb pageant representing Moorton and Pembrooke's names. During the night, the amateur actors rehearse their song dedicated to the ladies in front of the house where the bridegrooms are lodged. Seeing that Turnop is preoccupied and loses track of time, Tom warns it is almost morning and if they do not wake the brides the rehearsal will have been for nothing. When Shrimp replaces Will's song with his song about the ladies' loss, thus waking the lords, the clowns are accused of being involved in the ladies' escape. When Chester demands an explanation from the actors, Hugh thinks that Tom should answer, being the oldest of them all. Tom avoids a straight answer and says only that, as a poor professor of music, no one burdened him with the responsibility of more than two pence, so it is unthinkable that he should be charged with the value of three ladies. Chester sends the clowns and his servants in search of the ladies. At Gosselin's castle, John a Cumber discusses with the actors the play they are going to act before the lords. This play is intended to be a mockery of John a Kent, with John a Cumber playing John a Kent. Yet, the actors arrive after the play is enacted with the real characters acting as themselves, and after John a Cumber is humiliated in the disguise of John a Kent. The actors see the person whom they think to be John a Kent (actually John a Cumber in disguise) and they vent their abuse upon him, as taught by John a Cumber. After they perform this last act of humiliation at John a Cumber's expense, the actors exit to do their daily jobs.

TABYTHA [in Cutter: TABITHA]

Daughter to the Widow in Cowley's The Guardian. He is the object of marital plotting on the parts of Old Truman, who wants her (vainly) for his daughter-in-law, and Cutter, who succeeds in marrying her himself. Despite her puritanical upbringing, Tabytha soon succumbs to the less spiritual lifestyle of her new husband, drinking and dancing off to bed with him.

TACITUS

Only mentioned in Jonson's Epicoene. Cornelius Tacitus (55?–120?) was a great Roman historian. He was educated to be an orator and became a senator and a consul. The works of Tacitus are filled with dramatic power and clearly drawn character studies. The Histories deal with the events of the first century of the Roman Empire. At his house, the self-conceited Daw boasts his learning and poetic talent, while Clerimont and Dauphine deride his pompousness covertly. Daw shows his contempt for many great minds of classical antiquity. Daw refers to Tacitus in a deprecating manner, calling his work an entire knot, seldom worth the untying. Daw adds that he utters wise aphorisms every hour and, if only they were collected, he would become equally famous.

TACTUS **1607

One of the five senses in Tomkis’ Lingua. Touch. All that Common Sense may learn through touch he learns through Tactus. Lingua complains that the five senses have a monopoly and have barred the way to Common Sense. He wears a dark colored satin mantle over a pair of silk bases, a garland of bays with white and red roses upon a black ‘grogaram, a faulchion,’ wrought sleeves, and buskins. He finds the robe and crown that Lingua sets as a trap and, putting them on, imagines himself a Caesar or Alexander. When Olfactus appears, Tactus fears he’ll want to share the riches, and so he hides them by sitting upon them and claiming he cannot move because he has become a glass urinal and would break. When Gustus and Visus surprise him, he puts on the robe and tells a lie about getting it from a man from Crumena Vacua from which he has caught the plague. When his lie is discovered, he fights with the other senses over ownership of the crown, believing himself the best of the five. Auditus joins forces with Visus against Tactus and Gustus, each team agreeing that, should they win, the better fighter shall wear the crown whilst the other wears the robe. His army consists of urchins, tortoises, and spiders.When it is his turn to display his quality before Common Sense, he enters alone. He intended to show a gentlewoman being caressed by her lover, but the dozen maids attiring the boy as a gentlewoman took too long at it and the show is not ready in time. He fails to win, and Visus is awarded the crown while Tactus gets the robe. Having drunk Lingua’s wine, he believes himself to be Hercules furens. Somnus puts him to sleep and he is thus cured. According to tradition, this part was originally performed by Oliver Cromwell at Cambridge.

TAFFETA, CHANGEABLE

Changeable Taffeta is the widow of Master Taffeta, a rich merchant in Barry's Ram Alley. She and her maid Adriana sit in the widow and pass comment on the men who pass below. Seeing Thomas Boutcher, Taffeta drops her handkerchief to get his attention and sends Adriana to invite him into her house. After their inconclusive flirtation, she vows to court him, noting that "women must woo, / When men forget what Nature leads them to." Taffeta is also wooed by Sir Oliver Smallshanks, and Captain Face. When Captain Face comes to her house claiming to be her rightful husband, she calls on her men to eject him. Having lost her passion for Boutcher, she persuades him to rid her of Captain Face, secure in the prospect of laughing at both men's disgrace. Taffeta agrees to marry Sir Oliver because she wants to gain the social position that being his wife would guarantee. She banishes Sir Oliver's son William Smallshanks from her house when he disparages her desire to marry Sir Oliver. However, William comes to her at night and woos her; he eventually draws his sword and forces her to kiss him. She responds positively to this treatment and agrees to marry him, disgusted by the inert behavior of her other suitors.

TAFFETA, MASTER

A "ghost character" in Barry's Ram Alley. Master Taffeta was a rich merchant and the husband of Changeable Taffeta. He died some time before the opening of the play.

TAILBUSH, LADY

A courtier in Jonson's The Devil is an Ass. She hosts the "Spanish Lady's" salon for Merecraft, and also invests in his scheme to make and sell a new kind of "fucus" or cosmetic to court ladies. Her lover, Manly, almost becomes involved in a fight with Everill.

TAILBY**1605

The whore-Gallant (bawd, or gigolo) in Middleton's Your Five Gallants. One of Katherine's mercenary suitors. A lecher who professes true love to Primero's Courtesans, winning their trust and conning money and free sexual favors from them, but also courting rich men's wives. At Primero's brothel, he seduces the Novice and later has a liaison with Mistress Newcut. Tailby looses badly at Goldstone's crooked dice game and pawns his weapons and clothes at the gaming table. Fortunately, three mistresses all send him gifts of rich apparel later, to make up the loss. Riding to a further encounter in Kingston, he is waylaid and robbed by Pursenet, as a highwayman. The heist includes the chain of pearl first stolen from Katherine, given by Pursenet to a Courtesan, and by her to Tailby, and the Courtesan's love letter to Tailby. Tailby is thus exposed to Pursenet, but himself ignorant of his assailant. He fees two Constables to search for his missing chain, eventually finding it in Goldstone's possession. This triggers a confrontation leading to general recriminations between all the Gallants. Acknowledging their mutual villainy, they hug and join forces in their pursuit of Katherine- the winner to provide a safe house in perpetuity for all. After their exposure in his masque, Fitsgrave gives all the Gallants the ultimatum of marrying the Courtesans to avoid further public justice for their crimes. They all concede, without making clear who will partner whom: still, only Tailby has previously slept with every one of them.

TAILOR

See also TAYLOR and related spellings.

TAILOR **1540

Welcomes Chastity to sit among the Common People and drink with them in Lindsay's Satire of the Three Estates.

TAILOR **1590

A "ghost character" in Greene's James IV. Slipper wants to buy clothes from the tailor with the reward he has received for stealing Ateukin's letters.

TAILOR **1594

A dressmaker of Verona in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew. The Tailor is hired by Petruchio to make dress for Katherine. When the dress is brought for inspection, Petruchio, as part of his plan to tame Katherine, insults the Tailor and refuses to let her have the dress. Claiming it is unworthy for his Katherine, Petruchio tears it to pieces in front of her. The Tailor is secretly paid for his troubles when Petruchio sends Hortensio after him.

TAILOR **1599

Mute character in Dekker's Old Fortunatus. Crowned as a king by Fortune.

TAILOR **1599

Fungoso's Tailor enters Deliro's house in Jonson's Every Man out of His Humour. When Fungoso sees that Fastidious Brisk, whose elegance he admires and tries to emulate has another fashionable suit, he exits to fetch his Tailor and have his suit changed. Fungoso wants Tailor to copy the design of Fastidious Brisk's suit, but they just missed the courtier. Fungoso takes Tailor with him to St. Paul's, where Tailor views Fastidious Brisk's apparel. Tailor tells Fungoso he will do his best to make his client's new suit look exactly like the one Fastidious Brisk is wearing. Tailor exits with the impatient Fungoso to produce his suit. Fungoso refers to Tailor as Master Snip. After having made his suit, Tailor enters Deliro's house with Fungoso, followed by the others suppliers. When Tailor presents him with the bill, Fungoso says it is very reasonable, but asks him to take part of the money cash, and the rest on credit. Though Tailor hesitates at first, he finally accepts the proposal. However, when Fungoso notices that he lacks shoelaces for his new shoes, he asks Tailor to take two or three shillings off the cash payment and send him some accessories. Tailor promises he will do so and exits.

TAILOR **1602

One of the tradesman to whom Quintiliano owes money in Chapman's May Day. The tailor uses the argument that he must pay his son's schoolmaster.

TAILOR **1604

Brings the gown with which Birdlime hopes to bribe Mistress Justiniano to become the earl's mistress in Dekker and Webster's Westward Ho.

TAILOR **1605

To impress Bellamont in Dekker and Webster's Northward Ho, Doll Hornet has a tailor come when she receives him. Whether the tailor is real or whether the part is played by Tom Chartley or Dick Leverpool is not specified.

TAILOR **1605

Along with the barber, huntsman, falconer, and perfumer, he has a functional use befitting his name in Middleton's A Trick to Catch the Old One. After Hoard's marriage to Medler, these characters become the liveried servants of Walkadine Hoard, used by him to show off his newly acquired wealth.

TAILOR**1605

Summoned by Goldstone in Middleton's Your Five Gallants to placate the Second Courtesan with the offer of a new gown. When the Tailor stresses the expense of the clothes decided on, he is chased off by Goldstone as a cheat.

TAILOR **1606

He appears briefly in Middleton's Michaelmas Term to outfit the Country Wench in the continental fashions popular among London gallants.

TAILOR **1607

A "ghost character" in Sharpham's Cupid's Whirligig. He delivers one of the courtier Nucome's lavish doublets and who is not paid for his work.

TAILOR **1608

A tailor of London in Middleton and Dekker's Moll Cutpurse, The Roaring Girl. Moll Cutpurse hires the tailor to make her a suit of male apparel, and he later makes a male suit of clothes for Mary Fitzallard so that she can disguise herself and more easily meet with Sebastian Wengrave.

TAILOR **1609

The Tailor dresses Count Frederick and laughs at his jokes in Field's A Woman is a Weathercock.

TAILOR **1613

A "ghost character" in Tailor's The Hog Hath Lost His Pearl. Young Lord Wealthy's taylor [sic], possibly an onomastic pun.

TAILOR **1618

The Tailor, along with the Barber, petitions Hengist on behalf of the citizens of Queenborough, to choose their mayor in Middleton's Hengist.

TAILOR **1618

Creon's Tailor is made unemployed when Simonides inherits his father's estate in Massinger, Middleton and Rowley's The Old Law. Along with the other servants, the Tailor persuades Gnothos and the Clerk to help them find rich widows who are old enough to be executed under the Old Law. They marry these widows, and dance with them in a tavern. At the end of the play, Evander reveals that the Old Law was a fiction, and the servants are thus lumbered with their elderly wives.

TAILOR **1624

A "ghost character" in Middleton's A Game at Chess. The Fat Bishop keeps his belongings at a friendly tailor's house to avoid their being seized when he deserts the White House.

TAILOR **1626

One of Bianca's foolish suitors in Fletcher, Ford, Massinger and Webster's The Fair Maid of the Inn: requests Forobosco's help in inventing new fashions.

TAILOR **1627

Included among the disgruntled tradesmen in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. He complains of being out of work now that Plutus has made all honest men rich. He agrees with the other tradesmen–attorney, tinker, miller, tailor, shoemaker, etc. –to combine into an insurrection. Nothing comes of this, however, in the play, and they are not seen again.

TAILOR **1632

A "ghost character" in ?Brewer's The Country Girl. Mr. Plush talks about the high bill that he owes to his tailor when he comes to visit Lady Mosely.

TAILOR **1632

Creditor to Mihil Crosswill in Brome's The Weeding of Covent Garden, who, in an attempt to secure payment, agrees to participate in Mihil's attempted deception of his father that he wishes to marry an elderly widow.

TAILOR **1633

This unnamed Tailor in Marmion's A Fine Companion promises Careless that his new and elegant suit will be ready in three days.

TAILOR **1634

A spirit conjured by Mrs. Generous and Mall Spencer to aid Whetstone in his revenge against the gallants for calling him a bastard in Heywood and Brome's The Late Lancashire Witches. In order to cast aspersions on Master Shackston's paternity, the Tailor appears in the form of Shackston's mother's tailor, dances, and points to Shackston as if to claim him as his son; the suggestion is that Shackston too is a bastard. The play later implies, however, that this suggestion is groundless.

TAILOR **1637

He demands Young Gudgen to pay for a suit before it is made in Carlell's The Fool Would Be A Favorite, which Young Gudgen is reluctant to do. When Young Gudgen is practicing fencing, the Tailor readily bests him.

TAILOR **1638

Sets the Sergeants in pursuit of a debtor in Suckling's The Goblins; by mistake, they arrest Orsabrin. By this time, the Tailor has wandered off into a tavern, and is not seen again.

TAILOR **1639

A "ghost character" in Brome's A Mad Couple. He is sent to Alicia by Lord Lovely to make her a dress.

TAILOR **1641

The Tailor arrives at the Devil, a tavern, in act three of Killigrew's Parson's Wedding, looking for Jolly, who owes him money. Wild and Careless get the Tailor drunk in the hopes that he will confront Jolly and Jolly will beat him. The Tailor does confront Jolly–and threatens to have him arrested–but Jolly just laughs.

TAILOR, ASTROLOGICAL

A "ghost character" in Middleton's Anything for a Quiet Life. Upon Franklin's alleged death, Old Franklin decides to pay his son's debts and asks George to identify Franklin's creditors for him. George reads a list that supposedly contains the names of all the known creditors. When George reads the name of Master Weatherwise, the tailor by St. Clement's Church, Cressingham suggests he might be that new prophet, the astrological tailor. The reference is to a Puritan tailor named Ball, who prophesied and wagered that James would be crowned on the Pope's throne.

TAILOR, DOROTHEA'S

A "ghost character" in Davenport's The City Night Cap. He is mentioned by Dorothea in her confession. He has made a gown for her with the sleeves too short.

TAILOR, ENGLISH

One of the Madmen who torments the Duchess in Webster's The Duchess of Malfi.

TAILOR, FIRST and SECOND

Two tailors figure in Jonson's Cynthia's Revels.

TAILOR, FULVIO’S **1635

A “ghost character" in Rider’s The Twins. Charmia blames Fulvio’s tailor for making her love him because the twins are identical in every way except dress. This becomes important later when Gratiano passes himself off as Fulvio simply by wearing his brother’s clothes.

TAILOR, OLD

The old tailor enters Rawlins's The Rebellion with Sebastian (disguised as Giovanno) and a group of tailors. The old tailor is resolved to fight bravely for Spain in the war. The old tailor and Sebastian find a sleeping Antonio after Antonio has murdered the Governor. It is the old tailor who overhears Machvile speak to Raymond about a plot. The old tailor informs Sebastian and goes to inform King Philip about the troubles. The old tailor informs Sebastian that Evadne has been banished by Machvile. The old tailor provides Antonio and Sebastian with disguises so that they might infiltrate the court of Machvile and Raymond. The old tailor informs Virmine that he will not be performing at the end of the play. King Philip tells the old tailor to spread the word that the king had held court in the dwelling of a tailor.

TAILORS

There is a group of Spanish tailors in Rawlins's The Rebellion that accompany Sebastian (disguised as Giovanno) and the old tailor throughout the play. The tailors assist Sebastian in rescuing Antonio after the latter has been arrested for the Governor's murder. The tailors collectively mourn Sebastian's banishment and sing songs about how they grope female clients while taking measurements. The tailors spend a great deal of time preparing for a play that will tell the stories of Jeronimo, Horatio and Prince Balthazar; however, they play is never presented.

TAILORS **1638

“Ghost characters" in Mayne’s Amorous War. At the rumor of the Thracian invasion, they have taken to the street armed with yards and bodkins.

TAILOR'S SON

The tailor's son accompanies his father when he approaches Quintiliano for his payment in Chapman's May Day, and has a comic interchange with Innocentio.

TAILOR'S WIFE

Hearing that her husband is drinking with Chastity in Lindsay's Satire of the Three Estates, she becomes jealous, threatens Chastity, and chases her husband from the stage.

TAILOR'S WIFE

Tailor's wife is a "ghost character" in Jonson's Cynthia's Revels. The tailor serving the affected courtiers is summoned at their party together with the barber, perfumer, milliner, jeweler, and feather-maker. Mercury, disguised as a Frenchified Gentleman, uses and abuses these merchants, thus showing the gallants how ridiculous they are. While Barber is cutting and trimming Mercury's hair during the elegance contest, he asks Tailor if the cut is of equal proportion. Tailor answers affirmatively, eulogizing the coiffure. Since Mercury intends to overdo the courtiers' affected ways, he pretends that Tailor is wrong and starts abusing and beating him. Since Tailor has learned his lesson about expressing an opinion before such a difficult gentleman, when Mercury asks him if the perfume suits him well, Tailor says he should let his mistress be the judge. However, at Mercury's insistence, Tailor remarks there is never a mistress in the world that can mistake such a scent. At this point, Mercury starts abusing Tailor's wife, telling him that the good wife tailor has only the judgment to heat her husband's pressing tool, not the capacity to appreciate perfumes.

TAKALMOUTH TALLOW

A workman in the shipyard in Mountfort's The Launching of The Mary. The workmen quarrel genially as they work, and mutter about the massacre of Englishmen by the Dutch at Amboyna (although the reference to Amboyna was deleted by the censor). Later, they meet in a tavern, and Sheathing-Nail tells the story of the massacre (this too was censored). Trunnel encourages the workmen to taunt Dorothea Constance, whom they assume to be as unconstant as the other women in town, but they are chased off by Captain Fitzjohn. When the Mary is launched, the workmen entertain the East India Company board members with "some dainty dance, every one wearing the emblem of his name upon his head."

TALASSIO

Autolius calls Alcinous ‘Talassio’ in (?)Speed’s The Converted Robber when he sees that he has converted to the shepherd’s side.

TALBOT

A "ghost character" in the anonymous True Tragedy of Richard III. Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury is reportedly among the men fighting in support of Richmond against Richard III at Bosworth Field.

TALBOT, JOHN

There are two John Talbots in Shakespeare's 1 Henry VI.

TALBOT, SIR GILBERT

I.
A "ghost character" in Thomas Heywood's 2 Edward IV. Bourbon mentions Talbot as one who wreaked havoc in past battles with the French; Talbot does not appear in the play.
II.
A "ghost character" in Shakespeare's Richard III. Supporter of Richmond. Talbot joins Richmond's forces in Havorford West as they march to Bosworth.

TALES KINGCOB

He is a Kentish lord as his ancestors came from Canterbury in Chapman's Sir Giles Goosecap. He is the youngest of 10 brothers. He was christened as Decem Tales. Lord Tales is Sir Gyles Goosecappe's cousin as he is related to the family through his mother. He praises his relative in front of Penelope.

TALKAPACE, TIBET

With Annot Alyface, Tibet Talkapace is one of Dame Custance's maids in Udall's Ralph Roister Doister. As her name suggests, she is given to chatter and is especially fond of clichés and homely proverbs.

TALLBOY

Tallboy is Clack's choice of husband for Amie in Brome's A Jovial Crew. He accompanies Oliver in the search for Amie when she disappears with Martin. Tallboy vexes the other characters with his tears, moans, and sighs, though he forgets his griefs when Oldrents enjoins him to drown them in sack. Tallboy is also comforted when Martin loses Amie to the "beggar" Springlove.

TALLOW

A "ghost character" in Heywood's 2 If You Know Not Me. A currier once served by Quick.

TALLOW, TAKALMOUTH

A workman in the shipyard in Mountfort's The Launching of The Mary. The workmen quarrel genially as they work, and mutter about the massacre of Englishmen by the Dutch at Amboyna (although the reference to Amboyna was deleted by the censor). Later, they meet in a tavern, and Sheathing-Nail tells the story of the massacre (this too was censored). Trunnel encourages the workmen to taunt Dorothea Constance, whom they assume to be as unconstant as the other women in town, but they are chased off by Captain Fitzjohn. When the Mary is launched, the workmen entertain the East India Company board members with "some dainty dance, every one wearing the emblem of his name upon his head."

TALLOW–CHANDLER

A "ghost character" in William Rowley's A Match at Midnight. One of Bloodhound's clients, to whom Tim is sent to collect a bond.

TALEUS

Friend of Ramus in Marlowe's Massacre at Paris.

TAMAR

See also under TAMER, TAMOR, TIMIR, and related spellings.

TAMAR CAM

See also TAMER CHAM

TAMAR CAM

Variously spelled Tamor and Cham in the original plot of the anonymous Tamar Cam. Historically, Timur Khan was the grandson of and successor to Khublai Khan and ruled China during the Mongol Empire from 1294 to 1307, although this is probably not the historical figure meant. The name could refer to Timur i Leng (Timur the Lame, also known as Tamerlane or Tamburlaine), but this seems unlikely. The play was probably an attempt of Lord Strange's Men to compete with Marlowe's Tamburlaine plays–to do so with an identical story line makes little sense. Additionally, the Admiral's Men later acquired Tamar Cam and incorporated it into their repertoire, which would be senseless if it merely replicated the Tamburlaine plays they already owned. The scholar's chief clue resides in a secondary character. The appearance of Mango Cham in the play probably refers to Mangu Khan, grandson of Ghengis Khan, elder brother of Khublai Khan, and Mongol Emperor from 1251 to 1259. It is possible that the playwright mistook Timur Khan for his grandfather, Ghengis. It is more likely that Ghengis is himself meant. Ghengis Khan was only a title, the historical figure's actual name was Temuchin from which Tamor Cham could be a corruption. It seems at least possible that the original playwright intended to create a title (and story of conquest) enough like Tamburlaine to compete directly with the Admiral's company.

TAMBURLAINE

I.
A Scythian shepherd become a leader of raiders in Marlowe's Tamburlaine Part 1. There was a prophecy at his birth that he should rule Persia and conquer the world. This prophecy is often recalled in the course of the play. He is first seen wooing the Egyptian captive princess Zenocrate, whom he has waylaid on her way from Media to meet her betrothed, the King of Arabia. He falls in love with her immediately and swears she is more precious to him than the Persian crown for which he aims. At parley with Theridamas, he convinces the Persian to join him and bring his 1,000 horsemen. Shortly thereafter the Persian Cosroe, brother to the king, also joins Tamburlaine. In the battle with Mycetes, he finds the Persian king attempting to hide his crown and promises to have it from him. When the battle is won, Cosroe gives him the crown and regency of Persia. Tamburlaine then surprises Cosroe in his moment of triumph by attacking him and his 20,000 men in order to win the kingship itself. He kills Cosroe in battle and proclaims himself king of Persia. Before meeting the Turkish emperor, Bajazeth, in battle, he seats his betrothed Zenocrate beside the Turkish empress, Zabina, and promises to return victorious. When he defeats Bajazeth, he swears he will not ransom him. He puts him in a cage and uses him for his footstool. He lays siege to Damascus where he displays a series of colors to indicate his level of malice:By V, he is in black. When the virgins of Damascus come to plead for the city, he has them slain and their bodies hung on the city walls. He defeats Damascus, then meets and defeats the combined forces of Egypt and Arabia, killing the Arabian king and capturing the Soldan of Egypt. For Zenocrate's sake, he frees and enriches the Soldan, her father, crowns her queen of Persia, and promises her the rites of marriage at play's end.
II.
King of Persia in Marlowe's Tamburlaine the Great, Part 2. He first appears in I.iv on the Larissa plains with Zenocrate and their sons Calyphas, Amyras, and Celebinus. In II.iv as Zenocrate lies mortally ill, he calls on all the good of heaven and repeats the refrain that they are "to entertain divine Zenocrate." He restates his love to his dying wife and prays that her death might kill him, too. When she dies, he rages at the underworld and heavens. He orders her embalmed and taken along on campaign. He orders the city where she died burned and never rebuilt. When Calyphas shrinks from soldiering, Tamburlaine wounds his own arm to demonstrate how to look like a soldier. At Aleppo, he challenges the Turks and their contributory kings to single combat but is refused. After the battle, he learns that Calyphas did not fight and, ignoring the pleas of Theridamas, Techelle, Usumcasane, and Amyras, Tamburlaine stabs him to death. In IV.i before his defeated enemies he styles himself the Scourge of God. His concept of god often fluctuates between references to Mahomet and to Jove, Apollo, and the classical Greek pantheon. He has Trebizon and Soria draw his chariot while Orcanes and Jerusalem are held in reserve and led by common soldiers. He calls Trebizon and Soria "ye pampered jades of Asia." At Babylon he breaches the wall and orders a bridge be built across lake Limnasphaltis that surrounds the city. He orders the governor and all the people killed. He rejects Mahomet and has all copies of the Alcoran (Koran) burned, vowing to worship only God, whose scourge he is. He falls ills almost immediately after. Close to death, he learns that Callapine's new army has come. He rises from his deathbed and appears on the field, frightening the enemy into retreat by his very presence. He calls for a map and, lamenting what he has not conquered, bequeaths the unconquered world to his sons. He then calls on Amyras to be crowned. As he dies, he calls for Zenocrates' hearse. He bids farewell to all and dies.
III.
Only mentioned in ?Greene's Selimus I. Bajazet recalls his ancestor of the same name being locked in a cage by Tamburlaine, and Tonombey mentions him as an ancestor.
IV.
Only mentioned in the Anonymous Blurt, Master Constable. When Violetta hears Hipolito's bragging about the honor and excessive pleasures drawn from the activity of war, she dismisses the matter diplomatically, calling her brother a "most terrible Tamburlaine." By referring ironically to the Mongol conqueror whose short-lived empire stretched from India to Asia Minor, Violetta highlights the futility of war.
V.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Tamburlaine is mentioned by Doctor Clyster, when he catches Sir Cupid Phantsy versifying again, when he had made him assure him he would not do it again. Sir Cupid, in an attempt to avoid being reprimanded, replies he was at his prayers, but the Doctor, ironically, asks him: "What, so loud, and acting, as if Burbage's soul had newly revived Hamlet and Jeronimo again, or Alleyn, Tamburlaine?" Tamburlaine is the title character in Christopher Marlowe's play Tamburlaine The Great (Parts 1 and 2).
VI.
Only mentioned in Randolph's Praeludium. When Histrio explains to the Gentleman how the actors eked out a living during the period of deprivation, when the London theatres were closed because of the plague, he says some actors played Timberline to a butcher.
VII.
Only mentioned in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. Higgen compares himself favorably to Scanderbeg and Tamberlain.
VIII.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Pathomachia. Pride boasts of how he aided him.

TAMER CAMS**1600

A "ghost character" in Chettle, Dekker and Haughton's Patient Grissil. Referred to by Babulo as an authority for wonders in the world.

TAMER CHAM

See also TAMAR CAM and TAMER CAMS and related spellings.

TAMER CHAM

Only mentioned in the Anonymous Blurt, Master Constable. Tamer Cham is a variant of Timur Khan. The reference is to the Mongol conqueror whose short-lived empire stretched from India to Asia Minor, also known as Tamburlaine. Lazarillo wants to show his audacity, though he is reported to be a coward. When he hears Blurt speak about running from the enemy, Lazarillo says he will never run from the face of Tamer Cham. By claiming he is so brave that he does not fear one of the greatest conquerors of the world, Lazarillo creates a contrast with what Doyt says about him, namely that he ran from the enemy during the war.

TAMIRA **1617

Only mentioned in the anonymous Pathomachia. Queen of the Goths; she was a termagant as Hatred has become.

TAMORA

Tamora is the Queen of the Goths and later Empress of Rome by marriage to Saturninus in Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus. When Tamora's plea to Titus to have mercy on Alarbus is ignored, she, with the help of Saturninus, orchestrates several acts of vengeance upon Titus and his family: She frames Martius and Quintus for the murder of Bassianus, facilitates the rape and mutilation of Lavinia, and disguises herself as the spirit of Revenge in order to drive Titus insane. But Titus responds by killing Demetrius and Chiron and serving them to her in a meat pie at a banquet before killing Tamora herself.

TAMOREN

A complicated character in Suckling's The Goblins. He is highly important for the plot: leader of the thieves, guardian to Reginella, kidnapper of Orsabrin and eventually saviour both of him and of Samorat, when both are on trial for the death of Torcular–a man in fact still alive and abducted earlier by Tamoren himself. Tamoren's thieves are disguised as devils, a trick which enables them to provide little reminiscences of A Midsummer Night's Dream, while his own fatherly concern for his young relative Reginella recalls The Tempest. His friend Peridor confides to his captive Stramador that Tamoren is really a nobleman, from a clan opposed to that of the ruling Prince; he resorted to a life of crime after the defeat of his family in battle, vowing not reveal his identity till "some new troubles in the State", or "faire occasion." Tamoren comes to the trial to present the still-living Torcular, and, fair occasion appearing, explains who he himself and Reginella are–and also Orsabrin, whom he has discovered to be the Prince's long-lost brother. Orsabrin, released, is happily reunited with Reginella, and Tamoren himself is pardoned by the Prince.

TAMYRA

I.
Tamyra is the Countess of Montsurry in Chapman's Bussy D'Ambois. She is the only woman at court with kind words for Bussy when he first appears. Whether being ironic or not, Tamyra calls Bussy a true courtier. Tamyra gossips with Montsurry and Beaupre after Bussy fights and slays Barrisor, L'Anou and Pyrhot. Tamyra compliments Bussy, but swears she is not envious of D'Ambois' fawning over Elenor. What Tamyra cannot hide is the inattention paid to her by Montsurry. When her husband leaves Tamyra in the evening, Monsieur sneaks into her room and try to seduce her or, if that fails, coerce her into sex. Tamyra is able to dissuade Monsieur temporarily. Her husband, surprisingly, is not upset that the Duke has made advances toward Tamyra. Montsurry simply shrugs the matter off as princely prerogative. When Montsurry leaves Tamyra again, Tamyra dismisses her maid and informs the audience that the loves a man. It is reported by the Friar that Tamyra had been previously pursued by Barrisor and still kept a letter of his written in his own blood. When Tamyra spots Bussy and the Friar in her bedchamber, she affects surprise and tries to feign disinterest in Bussy. Tamyra and Bussy leave the stage together for a while and re-emerge again after apparently sharing some intimacy. Bussy leaves just in time for Montsurry to arrive at home in the morning. Montsurry tries to get Tamyra into bed, but she declines the invitation from her husband. After the feast, Montsurry accuses Tamyra of adultery, a charge she denies. Later, Montsurry drags Tamyra into their bedroom and throws the protesting Friar out. He demands that she tell him the name of her lover. When Tamyra refuses, Montsurry begins to repeatedly stab her. He tells her that he will keep stabbing her until she reveals her lover. Instruments of torture are brought into the room to further compel testimony. When the Friar comes into the room and is killed, Tamyra agrees to write her lover's name in blood. Tamyra tries to scream and warn Bussy not to enter the chamber where the ambush is set.
II.
Wife to Montsurry, and former lover of Bussy D'Ambois in Chapman's The Revenge of Bussy D'Ambois. She continues to mourn Bussy's death. She is willing to consider the disguised Charlotte as a means of revenge, but Clermont's appearance precludes that. She states that her husband's forgiveness as he is dying "breaks her heart." After Clermont's suicide, she vows to lead a cloistered life.

TANCRED

I.
Tancred, King of Naples and Prince of Salerne in Wilmot's Gismond of Salerne. He expresses concern over his widowed daughter's grief but opposes her remarriage and rebuffs Lucrece when she pleads that Gismond be allowed to take another husband. One day in search of his daughter, he goes to her chamber and, not finding her, sits at the foot of her bed and wraps himself in a curtain. His presence concealed, Tancred sees Gismond and Guishard enter the chamber through a secret trapdoor built into the floor. Later he reveals to his daughter that he knows of her affair. Tancred confronts Guishard and consigns him to a dungeon. The king orders his servants to slay Guishard and cut out his heart. Impaled on a sword, the heart is conveyed to Tancred, who then orders Renuchio to carry it in a golden cup to Gismond. Devastated by his daughter's suicide, Tancred accedes to her request that she be buried with her lover and that an epitaph proclaim the love that Gismond and Guishard had for one another. Tancred resolves to kill himself.
II.
The King of Naples (Prince of Salerne) in Wilmot's Tancred and Gismunda. He seeks to ease his daughter's grief over her husband's death, observing that her continued sorrow is unnatural and an affront to the heavens. Later he leaves his palace, intending to participate in a hunt, but he meets Lucrece, who pleads that Gismunda be permitted to remarry. Tancred rebuffs her and abandons the hunt. In a dumb show Tancred enters his daughter's chamber, finds her absent, and wraps a curtain around him as he waits for her. To his astonishment he sees Gismunda and her lover emerge from a secret tunnel into her chamber and amorously embrace. Emerging from his daughter's room, Tancred encounters Megaera, who hurls a snake at him. The enraged Tancred calls Renuchio, ordering that Gismunda be brought to him; he also orders Julio to intercept Guiszard outside the palace when he emerges from the tunnel that leads to Gismunda's chamber. Tancred confronts Gismunda, who pleads for understanding. But the king orders Julio to execute Guiszard and rip out his heart. Receiving that heart impaled on a sword, Tancred places it in a golden cup and orders that it be taken to Gismunda. When the maidens of the Chorus subsequently report that his daughter means to take her life, Tancred hastens to her chamber. He arrives to hear the dying Gismunda request that she be buried with her lover. Tancred commands that her last wishes be fulfilled and that his own body be buried alongside his daughter's; he intends to take his life.

TANCRED, a PRINCE of ITALY

Attempting to crush the bandits who occupy the Italian mountains in Thomas Heywood's The Four Prentices of London, Tancred interrupts the fight between Charles and Eustace. Impressed by their inherent nobility and martial valor, however, Tancred recruits Charles and Eustace for the crusade. Tancred also falls in love with Bella Franca and takes her into his own custody seemingly to forestall the amorous rivalry between Charles and Eustace. He observes Bella Franca leave the camp, follows her, is captured by the Soldan's forces, and is rescued by Eustace, disguised as the Grocer Knight. In the final scene of recognition, Tancred and Bella Franca are betrothed.

TANDORIX

Disguise adopted by Rosinda throughout Cokain's The Obstinate Lady. Rosinda's actual identity is revealed first to the audience, when she explains that she sent a false announcement of her drowning to her family, then arrived in the disguise of Tandorix to follow and observe her husband, to see if he would adhere to his vow to remain single if she should die. Tandorix delivers a letter of rejection from Lucora to Carionil, and she sympathizes with his situation, revealing that she favors him as a husband for her daughter. As Tandorix, she is present when her husband woos Antiphila, and vows to interfere with this suit. Still in disguise as Tandorix to the play's characters, Rosinda pities Lucora as she is pressured to wed Falrous. She dismisses the enmity between her family and Carionil's and wishes her daughter could marry him. When her son Philander challenges her to a duel, having been misled into believing Tandorix is contracted to Antiphila, she reveals her identity to him and vows him to secrecy. Her son is overjoyed at the recovery of his mother, and agrees to keep her secret. She enters masked but no longer disguised at the end of the play, accompanied by Philander. She disrupts the wedding announcement of Polidacre and Antiphila by revealing her identity at last, is joyfully reunited with her two daughters, and forgives her husband for his frailty. In the first edition of this play, Tandorix was the page's name.

TANGLE

Tangle is a crafty lawyer whose legalese increasingly pervades every aspect of his thought and speech in Middleton's The Phoenix. Tangle offers advice that all too often is in error; with the fees he collects, he pays upon his own rather large number of outstanding lawsuits. Tangle's obsessive and unethical behavior unsettles his mind to the extent that Quieto must minister to him, offering medicines, bleeding, and a bit of exorcism to clear Tangle's tangled mind.

TANNER

Only mentioned in Zouche's The Sophister. Distinction illustrates the cost of an attorney when he uses the example of a case between "younger and elder, Butcher and Tanner of Witam and Wolvercoate."

TANNIKIN

The name adopted by Luce when she disguises herself as a Dutch frau in The London Prodigal.

TANTALUS

I.
A king who had slain his own children, driven before the furies Alecto, Megera, and Ctesiphone (q.q.v) in the fourth act dumb show in Sackville and Norton's Gorboduc.
II.
A "ghost character" in Heywood's The Silver Age; as Hercules is exulting over the forces of darkness he announces his plan to feed this perpetually frustrated convict.
III.
Only mentioned in Randolph's Muses' Looking Glass. Tragedy uses this character as an example to convince Comedy of her superior ability to move men to reformation and improvement.

TANTOBLIN **1641

Warden of the Grobian company in (?)Shipman’s Grobiana’s Nuptials. Being called to the Grobian feast has hindered him in his business of emptying Sir Epikure’s jakes. He is deeply impressed by Grobiana’s going to the toilet and falls in love with her. When Ursin tries to kiss Grobiana, she calls for Tantoblin, who knocks him down with his staff. He admits the act to Vanslotten and Ursin is made to forgive him. He goes then to wed Grobiana.

TAPSTER **1589

Tapster is an innkeeper who throws Sly out of his inn and the next morning finds Sly and wakes him after his "dream" of being a lord in the Anonymous The Taming of a Shrew. When he hears that Sly has dreamed of how to tame a shrew, he offers to go home with Sly so that he can hear the details of the dream.

TAPSTER **1591

A "ghost character" in the Anonymous Arden of Feversham. Shakebag had hoped to hide at an old female acquaintance of his who apparently runs a tavern. When she refused him, he kicked her down the stairs and broke her neck. then stabbed her tapster to death as well.

TAPSTER **1607

Called Squire Tapstero by Rafe in The Grocer's Honour portion of Beaumont's Knight of the Burning Pestle. He welcomes Rafe and his band to the Bell Inn in Waltham. Next morning, he insists that the bill of twelve shillings be paid although, Quixote-like, Rafe only thanks him for his hospitality. He and the Host conspire to have the Knight of the Burning Pestle fight "Barbaroso."

TAPSTER **1614

When Tapster tries to collect for several rounds of drinks in the Anonymous The Faithful Friends, the bellicose Snipsnap breaks his head; he prevails on his employer to summon a constable to arrest the tailor for assault, but the arrest is broken off by the arrival of Marcellinus to impress Snipsnap and the other comic citizens into the army.

TAPSTER **1629

A "ghost character" in Jonson's The New Inn. Tapster is a law-enforcement officer. When Colonel Tipto marvels at Fly's dubious scholarship, asking how he came to the inn, Fly relates that Tapster and his officers arrested him on suspicion of drink and deposited him there. According to Host, Tapster is in the habit of hanging about in the inn's cellar, studying deeply the cases of cups and jugs, or whose horses may be tampered with, or what jugs must be filled up with beer. Host's irony starts from the reference to Fly's limited knowledge and tendency to alcoholism, and includes Tapster in his description of bad habits, such as addiction to drinking and racing. When Host mocks Tipto's hobby of fencing, he informs him of the latest news, namely that Euclid has challenged Archimedes to a game. Host pretends that Tapster has brought this news, which he received from a post that visited the inn three days before. Fly takes up Host's fictitious story, confirming that Tapster is a reliable and witty fellow, a Jack Jug with a broken belly, an allusion to Tapster's alcoholism.

TAPSTER**1634

Proprietor of an alehouse in Tottenham Court where much of Nabbes' Tottenham Court action takes place. After providing a room for Bellamie and Cicely, he promptly goes and tells the gallants where the women are, implying that they are prostitutes.

TAPSTERO **1607

A fantasy "ghost character" in The Grocer's Honour portion of Beaumont's Knight of the Burning Pestle. This is the cant name that the dwarf, little George, uses for one of the servants they are likely to meet at the Bell Inn in Waltham. In fact, the Tapster does appear and is called Squire Tapstero because of the dwarf's joke.

TAPWELL, TIMOTHY ("TIM")

Timothy Tapwell is "an alehouse keeper" and the husband of Froth in Massinger's A New Way to Pay Old Debts. He, along with his wife at the play's beginning, shows his ingratitude to Welborne's former charity by refusing to serve him at Marrall's command. Born on Welborne's father's land, Tapwell was a former servant to Old Sir John Welborne and "under-butler" to Welborne. After the death of Welborne's father he apparently bought a small cottage with money given to him by Welborne and started his bawdry business, from which he claims he has saved enough money to be thought worthy of being a "scavenger" and, hopefully, of becoming "overseer of the poor." When Welborne receives a sum of money from Overreach and is able to repay his debts Tapwell frets that the prodigal will expose his bawdry; nevertheless, along with Froth he approaches Welborne for payment of a debt, and although Froth is hopeful of Welborne's mercy, they attempt to bribe Justice Greedy into forcing Welborne to repay them. Instead, their tapping and drawing license is revoked by Greedy (who is successfully bribed by Welborne) and they are sent away with nothing. Although Froth is disappointed when Welborne is unmerciful, Tapwell admits that it is his due punishment for being an "unthankful knave."

TAR, TARQUIN

A workman in the shipyard in Mountfort's The Launching of The Mary. The workmen quarrel genially as they work, and mutter about the massacre of Englishmen by the Dutch at Amboyna (although the reference to Amboyna was deleted by the censor). Later, they meet in a tavern, and Sheathing-Nail tells the story of the massacre (this too was censored). Trunnel encourages the workmen to taunt Dorothea Constance, whom they assume to be as unconstant as the other women in town, but they are chased off by Captain Fitzjohn. When the Mary is launched, the workmen entertain the East India Company board members with "some dainty dance, every one wearing the emblem of his name upon his head."

TARGET, DOROTHEA

Dorothea is the first of the prostitutes brought before the duke in the final act of Dekker's 2 Honest Whore. Appearing in a rich costume, she exchanges insults with Astolfo, Orlando, and Carolo. When Infelice asks her if she regrets finding herself in prison, Dorothea mocks the countess and exists singing.

TARIFA

An old General, Conqueror of Spain, former tutor to Abilqualit in Glapthorne's Revenge for Honor. A valiant and successful soldier, described as a Hector by Selinthus. He is reported as melancholy at the start of the play: he is both saddened to be now too old to lead the Caliph's army in a new war against Persia, and deeply worried by the melancholy of Prince Abilqualit, who is to be his successor as general. Abilqualit confides to Tarifa his desperate love for Caropia and his reluctance to lead the army. Tarifa cannot comprehend any cause greater than war and is horrified at Abilqualit's infatuation. His good advice goes unheeded and he fears for the prince's honor. After the alleged rape of Caropia, Tarifa, as High Marshall, must arrest Abilqualit. He first quarrels with the outraged husband, Mura, maintaining that the prince's high status, as heir to the empire, must exempt him from punishment. At the trial, although believing Abilqualit guilty, Tarifa pleads with the Caliph for clemency. He again argues that a prince should be above the law. Abilqualit himself reproaches Tarifa for partiality, and publicly maintains his false confession. Tarifa privately reveals to the Caliph Abilqualit's innocence (of rape) and Caropia's dishonor (of consenting to adultery). Again, Abilqualit publicly contradicts him. When the death sentence is seemingly carried out, Tarifa denounces the Caliph as a tyrant and continues to protest the prince's innocence. The two old men grieve together over the prince's body and the Caliph is persuaded by Tarifa to repent his harshness before he dies of grief. Abrahen, the new Caliph, sends Tarifa to quiet the soldiers' mutiny; he intervenes in time to save Caropia's life from reprisal killing by the captains loyal to Abilqualit. When Abilqualit confronts his evil brother, and Abrahen proposes a duel for both the empire and the hand of Caropia, Abilqualit first accepts the offered duel but Tarifa intervenes to object. He argues that the title is undoubtedly already due to Abilqualit and to risk it in a fight would be foolish and unjust. Events overtake the resolution of his argument and Abrahen kills Caropia and himself while Caropia stabs Abilqualit; with his dying words, Abilqualit bequeaths the empire to Tarifa, mentioning that he already has a son and heir, and seems likely to found a thriving new dynasty for Arabia.

TARLTON, RICHARD

I.
A "ghost character" in Wilson's The Three Lords and Three Ladies of London. Simplicity carries an image of the recently deceased clown Richard Tarlton with him, and speaks an elegy on him.
II.
Only mentioned in Jonson's Bartholomew Fair. Richard Tarlton was a leading comedian of Queen Elizabeth's reign, who died in 1588. The stage-keeper in the Induction complains that the Author of the play does not observe the characteristics of real life in his theatrical Fair. The stage-keeper thinks he can impart of his considerable experience in the theatre, because he had kept the stage in Master Tarlton's time as well. The stage-keeper wished that Tarlton had lived to play in Bartholomew Fair. The stage-keeper creates a fictional picture of the well-known actor interpreting one of the cozening characters in Bartholomew Fair.
III.
Only mentioned in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. The famous Elizabethan clown. Cleon's ghost accuses Aristophanes of being the "Tarlton of Athens."
IV.
Only mentioned in the anonymous 1 Return From Parnassus. Ingenioso wishes he could live in the underworld with the famous clown, Richard Tarleton, rather than having to deal with clotpolls like the Serving Man.

TARLTON, RICHARD (GHOST of) **1601

The prologue in Percy’s Cuckqueans and Cuckolds Errants. He enters ‘after second sounding’ and plays on his tabor whilst standing beneath an image of himself, a pub sign, decorated with a garland. He is dressed as Tarlton, drum, cap, slops, shoes, and merit as when alive, to express his gratitude that Pigot has raised a tavern in Colchester to his name. He asserts that since his ‘departure from this sink of sin, the world . . . in the year of our Lord God, my Redeemer 1588’, the tavern has been maintained in its ‘Ancient Bawdry’, which he promises the following play will make clear. He ends his prologue by asking the audience to judge the play kindly and if ever in Colchester to stop by Mr. Pigot’s tavern and partake of Tarlton’s funeral supper which Mr. Pigot will bestow upon them gratis. His final stage direction reads as follows: “He played a little then departed. Here they sounded the third” and the play begins with Doucebella, Floradin, Rafe, and Joice entering “from Maldon”.

TARLTON’S WIFE

Only mentioned in Percy’s Cuckqueans and Cuckolds Errants. She was one to join Tarlton at a wine tavern and ‘make up thirteen to the dozen’ according to the ghost of Tarlton ‘God rest her sweete soul’.

TARMIA

Daughter of the Persian Shah in the anonymous Tamar Cam. She has two sons in the play and is likely addressed by the Oracle, but little more is recoverable from the plot.

TARMIEL

Only mentioned in Jonson's The Alchemist. Mathlai, Tarmiel, Barborat, Rael, Velel, and Thiel are the names of spirits taken from Elementa Magica by Pietro d'Albano. Subtle recommends to the gullible Drugger the best solutions for the location of his shop. He suggests that Drugger should write the names of Mathlai, Tarmiel, and Barborat on the eastern side of his shop, and Rael, Velel, and Thiel on the northern part. Subtle claims these are the names of the Mercurial spirits, meant to frighten flies from the boxes of tobacco. Implicitly, the god of commerce, Mercury, was supposed to protect the shop.

TARPAX

Tarpax is a winged devil in Kirke's The Seven Champions of Christendom. He is under the command of Calib the witch, although his powers are evidently greater than hers. Calib and Tarpax reveal to Suckabus that they are his mother and father. When George attacks Calib, Tarpax abandons her. He permits Suckabus to join George on his travels, but tells him that his mother is now a duchess in Hell, and that the only way to see her again is to indulge in sin. Tarpax becomes a servant of Ormandine the enchanter. When George and Suckabus arrive to slay Ormandine, Tarpax chides Suckabus for not indulging in sin sufficiently, and gives him magic spells to aid him, adding that he will come whenever he calls him. But when Suckabus is in danger in Brandron's castle, Tarpax does not come to help him.

TARQUIN

I.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Tarquin is mentioned by Sir Cupid Phantsy when, after Doctor Clyster tells him that he is longing in love when he has no reward, he replies: "I forbear to play the Tarquin with my Lucretia, thinking I've gained something upon her when indeed I've lost." Tarquin was the son of a Roman king. He raped Lucretia.
II.
Tarquin is the Prince of Rome, son of the former king (unnamed), and husband to Tullia in Heywood's The Rape of Lucrece. He is convinced by his wife to overthrow Servius. After Tullia desecrates her father's corpse, Tarquin orders that Servius be burned in a pyre with all solemn and due obsequies. His son Sextus temporarily rebels but is brought back into the family fold when he decapitates the leaders of the Gabines. Tarquin also makes a pact (a "religious league") with the King of the Tuscans, Porsenna. Tarquin then orders Sextus to join Collatine and his forces, leaving Porsenna's forces in charge of Rome. As the civil war breaks out, we see Brutus and his allies chasing Tarquin and Tullia. Tarquin swears to fight on, calling on Jove to help his cause, an ironic echo of Lucrece's invocation. (See entry for Lucrece.) Tarquin and his army are beaten off but then re enter and attack Horatius Cocles, who has been left alone to man the bridge. For reasons that are not explained, the bridge falls. Was it by divine intervention or the sheer weight of Tarquin's army? Later in the same battle, an arrow wounds Tarquin. Tarquin asks that Tullia take horse and live to fight another day, but she stands by her man as Collatine, Lucretius and Mutius Scevola close on them. Both Tarquin and Tullia are killed. Brutus, covered in blood, vows that they will not be buried, an act that is in stark contrast to Tarquin's decorous burial of Servius. The bodies of the Tarquin and Tullia and Aruns are displayed to weaken the resolve of Sextus and his remaining troops.
III.
Only mentioned in the anonymous The Wasp. Katherine alludes to Marianus as the Tarquin whom Gerald's Brutus must depose.

TARQUIN TAR

A workman in the shipyard in Mountfort's The Launching of The Mary. The workmen quarrel genially as they work, and mutter about the massacre of Englishmen by the Dutch at Amboyna (although the reference to Amboyna was deleted by the censor). Later, they meet in a tavern, and Sheathing-Nail tells the story of the massacre (this too was censored). Trunnel encourages the workmen to taunt Dorothea Constance, whom they assume to be as unconstant as the other women in town, but they are chased off by Captain Fitzjohn. When the Mary is launched, the workmen entertain the East India Company board members with "some dainty dance, every one wearing the emblem of his name upon his head."

TARQUIN PRISCUS, LUCIUS

Only mentioned in Jonson's Catiline. Lucius Tarquinius Priscus, or Tarquinius Superbus, was the legendary fifth king of Rome. His son, Sextus, raped the Roman matron Lucrece, who committed suicide for this reason. Curius says Fulvia is a Lais and she has all the attributes of a courtesan, so she cannot pretend to have turned Lucrece, a virtuous woman, all of a sudden. In reply, Fulvia tells Curius to keep off his ravisher's hands, because she he would not kill herself, as Lucretia did, for this Tarquin. By comparing Curius with Tarquin, whose name remained connected with that of a rapist, Fulvia alludes to Curius's brutal sexual behavior.

TARQUINIUS

A "ghost character" in Jonson's Catiline. Tarquinius is a lesser member of Catiline's conspiracy. After the conspirators have been tried and condemned in the Senate, word comes that one Tarquinius has been arrested. According to Flaccus, Tarquinius confessed he was going to Catiline as a messenger, sent by Crassus, whom he named as being implicated in Catiline's conspiracy. While Crassus, on hearing the allegations, wants the accuser to be brought in the Senate to testify, Cicero rules against it, saying that he is not worth the trouble, because he is certain of Crassus's innocence. Cicero instructs the praetor to keep Tarquinius in prison and hungry till he confesses by whose orders he acted in accusing Crassus. In an aside, Crassus says he fears that Tarquinius acted by Cicero's instructions, in order to have Crassus under control. Syllanus adds that some lesser members of the conspiracy, in order to give credit to their action, might name even Cicero as an accomplice. Cicero responds that he knows himself, and that he knows Crassus to be a just and noble patriot.

TARQUIN'S FATHER

A "ghost character" in Heywood's The Rape of Lucrece. The former King of Rome, Tarquin's father was overthrown and killed by Servius.

TARTARE, PRESIDENT of

He refuses in Verney’s Antipoe to execute Antipoe without charges or trial and chastises Dramurgon for his tyranny. He later attempts to convince Cleantha to wed Antipoe and forsake Dramurgon. When he discovers that Cleantha has committed suicide over the death of Antipoe, he falls down and dies. He is later [supposedly] seen as a ghost, clad in white, ascending to the throne with the others at the behest of Brutus.

TARTARS **1587

The name most often used to describe the soldiers of Tamburlaine in Marlowe's Tamburlaine Part 1.

TARTARS **1618

"Ghost characters" in Fletcher's The Loyal Subject. When Archas takes his farewell to his arms, he observes that he has used them against the Tartars on the Volga. After the ceremony of Archas's retirement, the Second Post brings the news that the Tartars are at the borders, killing everybody and burning villages on their way.

TATIUS

Only mentioned in Jonson's The New Inn. Achilles Tatius of Alexandria was a Greek rhetorician, author of the erotic romance, the Adventures of Leucippe and Cleitophon, which flourished about AD 450. Many of the incidents of the romance are highly improbable, and the characters, except the heroine, fail to enlist sympathy. The descriptive passages and digressions, although tedious and introduced without adequate reasons, are the best part of the work. Lady Frampul shows her admiration for Lovel's eloquent speech on love, and she says his words breathe the true divinity of love, as if they were inspired from the writings of all the great fathers who wrote of this subject. Lady Frampul mentions Tatius among these great writers of love romances. It seems that Lady Frampul's idea about great names in the literature about love is restricted to the writers of romance.

TATTLE, GOSSIP

A wealthy citizen-wife in Jonson's The Staple of News. She has come to attend The Staple of News. She and her gossips sit on the stage and reveal their ignorance as to the conventions and standards of stage comedy. She compares everything in the play to what she has heard from other gossips.

[TAURINUS]

The name of Taurinus, an Arminian divine, appears scored through in the MS of Fletcher and Massinger's Sir John Van Olden Barnavelt cf. Utenbogart.

TAURUS

Taurus is one of Caesar's commanders in Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra. Caesar tells him not to attack on land.

TAVERN BOY, FIRST, SECOND, and THIRD

Three tavern boys figure in Fletcher's The Captain.
  • The First Tavern Boy is possibly also called Peter.
  • The Second Tavern Boy is probably also called Robin. He brings alcohol to the Host, Jacamo, Piso, and Lodowicke.
  • The Third Tavern Boy is given no name.
All three boys draw alcohol and prepare tobacco for the Host and discuss how drunk the Host and Jacamo are.

TAVERN SERVANT, FIRST and SECOND

Two servants in Fletcher's The Captain. They bring orders for alcohol to the three tavern boys.

TAVERNER

Keeper of the Inn in Rastell's Four Elements, he jokes with Humanity and Sensual Desire and prepares a feast for them.

TAVIE **1599

A Welshman in Ruggle’s Club Law. He offers Niphle a courtesan, Luce, in return for advancement to chief sergeant. He speaks in a broad stage-Welsh accent. Cricket lures him from the Burgomaster’s feast by telling him a countryman named Morgan waits for him. Tavie goes to Cricket’s room where he is locked in and whipped until he misses his dinner. He later trips over Cricket’s rope and is beaten. Niphle sets up an assignation for Luce, telling Tavie that the password will be “I burn." He answers the door to Cricket, believing him to be Niphle, and is surprised when he is knocked down. He angrily shuts the door and refuses to let the real Niphle in when he arrives disguised. At last he relents and lets Niphle in, but Musonius, Philenius and the searchers arrive. He warns Niphles and tries to hold the searchers out but to no avail. Philenius and Musonius leave the searchers to arrest Luce and then come to arrest Tavie themselves. Tavie begs them to be left to watch the house, and they promise to be back tomorrow with his punishments. Tavie boasts to Puff and the others that with the arrest of Niphle he is now Captain Tavie who will make the “Athenians" smart for what they have done. After the fight, in which the townsmen are soundly beaten, Puff says Tavie has turned to “cogging" (cheating or swindling, often with loaded dice) and will get much by it. He comes upon Cricket and asks to serve him. He accepts Cricket’s offer to speak to the Butler to make him under skinker in the Buttery.

TAX COLLECTOR

Strawe confronts the tax collector for exceeding his office in the anonymous Jack Straw. As part of his duties, the tax collector has tried to confirm the age of Jacke Strawe's daughter by searching her to see whether she has developed pubic hair. Strawe kills him both for this outrage and for collecting the taxes.

TAXIMAGALUS

Petty King in Kent in Fisher's Fuimus Troes. The "four Kings of Kent" (Cingetorix, Carvilius, Taximagulus and Segonax) are followers of Cassibelane.

TAYLER, TOM

Tom Tayler is a friend of Tom Tyler, who lives his life at ease in the anonymous Tom Tyler And His Wife. At Tom Tyler's request he promises to find a way to get Tyler's wife to change her ways. He gets a cudgel and puts on Tyler's clothes. When Strife enters she beats Tom Tayler mistaking him for her husband. Tayler responds violently and Strife retreats, wounded. He explains to Tom Tyler is detail what he has done and the two sing a song. At the end Destiny points out that people simply have to put up with whatever end they come to, at which Tom Tayler strikes Tom Tyler explaining that he was born to take blows.

TAYLOR

See also TAILOR and related spellings.

TAYLOR **1600

The Taylor, like the Draper in the anonymous 1 Return From Parnassus, has unwisely extended credit to the departed scholars.

TAYLOR **1629

Mr. Taylor is a creditor in ?Clavell's The Soddered Citizen. He had offered his services to Undermine and now he sends his servant to see Sly, in the hope his master–Undermine–should pay him his bill. But his servant is not going to receive any money. Later he will be misled by Undermine again, who will let him believe that he will recover his money from Mountayne. But, in the end, Undermine will become an honest man, and meet his debts.

TAYLOR **1642

Taylor (who is possibly a misprint for "Jailor") allows Aurelia, disguised as Lucia, to visit Truman in prison in Cowley's The Guardian.

[There is no equivalent in Cowley's own 1658 revision of this play, Cutter of Coleman Street (performed 1661); Young Truman is locked up in Jolly's house.]

TAYLOR, JOSEPH

Only mentioned in Jonson's Bartholomew Fair. Joseph Taylor was an actor who was probably in the original cast of Bartholomew Fair at the Hope Theatre in 1614. John Taylor was a poet who had won a wit combat (by default) at the Hope Theatre. When Lantern/Leatherhead shows Cokes the puppets as the "actors" of the play, he says they are dumb, and he is the voice for all of them. Cokes replies that, since one man is the mouth for all of them, one Taylor could beat all these helpless actors with a hand bound behind him. The allusion is threefold. First, it refers to any tailor (and tailors were supposed to be timid) who could beat the defenseless actors. Second, it refers to Joseph Taylor, who played in Bartholomew Fair, probably the part of Lantern/Leatherhead. Third, it refers to the poet John Taylor, who won a fight of wits, and therefore was not expected to be particularly strong, being able to beat the puppet-actors easily. In all situations, Cokes imagines a scene in which much quarreling and beating is involved, which is not far from the actual representation of the puppet-play.

TEACHER, MUSIC

A "ghost character" in Davenant's The Cruel Brother. When Lucio comes to visit Foreste and Corsa, he hears music and is informed by Foreste that it is the Florentine, who instructs Corsa in music.

TEAGUE

An Irish runner in Shirley's Hyde Park, who defeats an Englishman in the foot race.

TEAGE Mac BREEAN

A "ghost character" in Dekker, Ford and Rowley's The Welsh Embassador. Mentioned by Edmond in his disguise as an Irishman.

TEARCAT

A confidence trickster and friend of Ralph Trapdoor in Middleton and Dekker's Moll Cutpurse, The Roaring Girl. Tearcat's name means to rant and rave. He and Trapdoor disguise themselves as poor soldiers and accost Moll Cutpurse, Jack Dapper, Sir Beauteous Ganymede, Sir Thomas Long, and Lord Noland. The two cant with Moll (i.e. speak criminal street slang), while she translates and explains canting to the others, giving them (and the audience) a lesson in street wiles.

TEARCHAPS

Tearchaps is a roaring boy in Field's Amends for Ladies. He is found in a tavern on Turnbull Street, in the company of Whorebang, Bots and Spillblood. Welltried brings Lord Feesimple to them in an attempt to cure his fear of swords. A fight breaks out, and Whorebang, Tearchaps, Bots and Spillblood flee the scene.

TEARSHEET, DOLL

I.
Doll Tearsheet is a friend of Mistress Quickly who tends to over imbibe Canary wine in Shakespeare's 2 Henry IV. Her given name is Dorothy, and Falstaff's page claims that she is some sort of relation to Falstaff. According to Poins, however, Doll is not a gentlewoman but rather a commoner. Her name might be a corruption from the term "Tear–Street," a cant word for prostitute. If so, Hal's comment, "This Doll Tearsheet should be some road," is explained.
II.
A "ghost character" in Shakespeare's Henry V. When Pistol and Nym fight over Nell Quickly, who has married Pistol after promising to marry Nym, Pistol recommends that Nym forget about her and pursue Doll Tearsheet instead. In 2 Henry IV, Doll Tearsheet had been involved with Falstaff. Pistol later laments "my Doll is dead," which may be a corruption in the text and meant to be "Nell" (Mistress Quickly). The reference could be a vestige from an earlier draft that included Falstaff.

TEARTHECOAT **1641

A “ghost character" in (?)Shipman’s Grobiana’s Nuptials. One of Ursin’s bears along with the white bear, Rose, and Nan Stiles.

TECHELLES

I.
A follower of Tamburlaine in Marlowe's Tamburlaine Part 1. He is in awe of his lord as the play opens. After helping Tamburlaine place Cosroe on the throne of Persia, he immediately assists Tamburlaine in usurping him. When later Agydas attempts to dissuade Zenocrate from loving Tamburlaine, Techelles and Usumcasane are sent to kill him. They witness Agydas' suicide and agree that he made a good end. In parley with Bajazeth and his contributory kings, he reacts to the Turks' pomp by advising Tamburlaine not to prolong their lives with talk. He helps defeat the Turks and reenters wearing the crown of one of the contributory kings. Tamburlaine later crowns him king of Fez. Outside Damascus, he is charged with slaying the Damascus virgins and hoisting them up onto the city walls, which he does. He later reports the fall of the city and the approach of the combined Egyptian and Arabian forces. After the Egyptian and Arabian defeat, he says he is ready to crown Zenocrate queen of Persia himself and looks forward to her marriage to Tamburlaine. At play's end, during the coronation, Tamburlaine sends him to his kingdom to rule.
II.
King of Fez in Marlowe's Tamburlaine the Great, Part 2. He meets Tamburlaine at Larissa plains to join forces with him against the Turk. He gives up his crown to Tamburlaine, promises his support, and receives his crown again. He and Theridamas besiege Balsera. When the town falls, he finds Olympia about to commit suicide. He stops her, impressed by her resolve, and takes her to Tamburlaine. Once the Turks are defeated at Aleppo and Tamburlaine is incensed against Calyphas, Techelles begs for the boy's pardon. He later accompanies Tamburlaine to Babylon, and, in its defeat, Tamburlaine orders Techelles to drown every man, woman, and child and leave no Babylonian behind. When Tamburlaine falls ill, Techelles laments. He is present at Tamburlaine's death and assists in crowning Amyras.

TECHMESSA **1632

One of the title characters in Randolph's Jealous Lovers. Chremylus and Dipsas' daughter. She is jealous of Pamphilus' love and vacillates between believing in his constancy and doubting it. Ballio tells her that Pamphilus prefers any woman in Thebes over her. She makes Ballio prove his accusations by making Pamphilus give up his sword rather than defend her honor. Paegnium comes from Pamphilus with love letters for Techmessa. She takes the letters gladly but sends word that she will not read them. Ballio then produces Pamphilus' sword, which he actually stole from Paegnium, and swears that Pamphilus dispraised her grievously. When Pamphilus arrives, Techmessa has her maid Phronesium humiliate him. When it is revealed that Ballio stole the sword, they are momentarily reconciled. Still uncertain of him, Techmessa sends Evadne to test Pamphilus for her while she watches in secret. She does not realize that Pamphilus has been sent by Tyndarus to test Evadne, and she is outraged when the two embrace and kiss passionately. She rejects her sister as treacherous and tells Tyndarus of the tryst. The truth of the test, however, is shortly revealed. Later, she and Tyndarus agree to pretend to commit suicide. She is taken to the church in a coffin and rises only when the Sexton's wife, Staphyla, tries to rob her "corpse." When Staphyla faints, Techmessa disguises herself as Staphyla and puts the Sexton's wife in the coffin. She witnesses Pamphilus' attempted suicide over her coffin and (still in disguise) prevent him. She does not reveal herself until after Tyndarus also prevents first Evadne's and then Dipsas' suicides. Upon learning that Pamphilus is in reality her brother Timarchus, Techmessa marries Tyndarus instead (who is in reality Clinias).

TECHNE

Techne is a "subtle wench of Corinth," a bawd who spreads the use of cosmetics and worldly attitudes towards love in Daniel's The Queen's Arcadia. She is a confederate of the seducer Colax and an associate of the corrupt lawyer Lincus, the physician Alcon and the "disguiser of religion Pistophoenax. They have come to Arcadia and plot to exploit and corrupt the innocent nymphs and shepherds. Colax and Techne watch Carinus and Amyntas quarrel over Cloris. Colax mocks the fervour of Carius and Amyntas, and asks for Techne's help in getting Cloris for himself. Techne objects that he will thus desert Dorinda, whose affection she took great pains to gain for Colax. Colax explains that he desires variety. Techne sympathizes with Dorinda but reflects that she had deserted Mirtillus in favor of Colax. Techne, who is herself attracted to Amyntas, teases Cloris about the quarrelling of Amyntas and Carinus and tries to win her affection for Colax. She informs Colax that she has arranged meet Cloris at Erycinas Grove to fit her with new clothes, and that this will give him an opportunity to work on her; she doubts, however, that Colax will succeed with Cloris. Finding herself rebuffed by Amyntas, Techne claims that if he goes to Erycinas Grove he will see that Cloris is unfaithful to him. Amyntas sees Cloris exit the cave with Colax and despairs; Techne tries to persuade him to love her instead. After he leaves, distraught, Techne worries that he will commit suicide. She sees no alternative but to find Cloris and persuade her to dissuade him. Techne comes before Ergistus and Meliboeus, together with Colax, Alcon, Lincus and Pistophoenax. When the outsiders are banished, Colax proposes to Techne that they must now marry each other and relocate to Corinth or another city in order to continue their trade. Neither seems particularly enchanted by the prospect.

TECNICUS

Tecnicus is a stock wise man in Ford's The Broken Heart. He is good at giving advice and unscrambling the riddle of Apollo for the court at Sparta. His name means "artist."

TEDIOUSNESS**1568

A giant and Science's mortal foe in the anonymous Marriage of Wit and Science. Wit, Will, and Diligence go into the wood to fight the giant, who taunts them and makes short work of defeating them. He knocks Wit to the ground and leaves him for dead, laughing at him. Later, a reformed Wit returns and with the aid of Will and advice from Instruction, Wit defeats and decapitates Tediousness.

TELAMON **1608

Telamon is a servant to the duke Leontius in Beaumont & Fletcher's Cupid's Revenge. He and Timantus discuss Leontius' efforts to dress himself up in order to woo Bacha. As the duke deteriorates physically, Telamon has to carry him around.

TELAMON**1611

I.
Telamon serves Meleager and is one of Jason's Argonauts in Heywood's Brazen Age. He is the first to challenge the Caledonian Boar. Telamon helps restore order after a fight between the Greek men breaks out. Telamon is the first Greek to scale Troy's walls during Hercules's assault upon the city. For his valor, Hercules offers Telamon the first choice of the city's spoils. Telamon chooses Hesione, over her objections. Telamon travels to Lydia to rescue Hercules from Omphale.
II.
A "ghost character" in Heywood's 1 The Iron Age, Telamon was a friend of Hercules and the father of Ajax. When the Trojan king Laomedon refuses to pay Hercules for saving his daughter Hesione, the Greek hero gives the Trojan princess to Telamon in recognition of his bravery in the fight against Laomedon. Telamon takes Hesione home to Greece. Paris sails to Greece on the pretext of rescuing Hesione from her enforced sojourn with Telamon.

TELEBOAN OFFICER

The Teleboans have just been defeated by Amphitryo when the latter's episode of the play begins. Janzen's cast-list of Heywood's The Escapes of Jupiter includes a "Teleboan Officer"; no individual character is identified in the brief scene where they appear, but they have a spokesman who capitulates on their behalf to Amphitryo and offers him a golden bowl–later to be a cause of confusion between him and his wife.

TELEMACHUS **1537

Young son of Ulysses in Udall's? Thersites, sent by his father to be cured of the worms by Thersites's mother.

TELEMACHUS **1600

A "ghost character" in the anonymous Maid's Metamorphosis. Telemachus is the Duke, and Ascanius's father. He does not want his son to marry Eurymine, a girl of obscure origin, because he intends to marry his son to a girl of noble stock. Thus, he tells two of his servants to kill Eurymine. Later the Duke repents and he is glad to find out that the girl had not been murdered. Then he sends a servant, Phylander, to look for his son, his beloved one and his page, in order to bring them back to court.

TELESILLA

A maid of Cornelia in Chapman's Caesar and Pompey.

TELLUS **1588

In love with Endymion in Lyly's Endymion. She asserts that "as long as sword, fire or poison may be hired, no traitor to my love shall live unrevenged." She determines to trap him into loving her. She engages the enchantress, Dipsas, to confound Endymion's love with Cynthia. Cynthia banishes her to a desert castle to punish her haughtiness. Corsites takes her there. When Corsites confesses his love to her, Tellus promises to love him in return if he will only move Endymion's sleeping body to a secure place. It is a trick, for she knows that the curse will keep him from being moved. When Endymion is restored, Tellus is at last brought to Cynthia where she learns of Endymion's loyal and honorable love of the Queen. Tellus then accepts the love of Corsites.

TELLUS **1611

The name by which the list of dramatis personæ refers to the personified Earth in Heywood's The Silver Age.

TELUSA

A nymph of Diana in Lyly's Gallathea. She falls in love with "Melebeus" (Phyllida in disguise).

TEMAINTE

Termainte is apparently the name of one of the three Jews who visits Barabas in the first scene of Marlowe's The Jew of Malta. Barabas uses this name, along with that of Zaareth, to bid farewell to the Jews, but neither name is linked with a specific character.

TEMERITY **1617

A “ghost character" in the anonymous Pathomachia. One of the twenty-five vices that are the extremes of the eleven virtues. Temerity and Timidity are the extremes of Fortitude.

TEMPERANCE **1535

Temperance debates with Disobedience, who strikes her in the anonymous Temperance and Humility. She upbraids Disobedience for all of the sorrow he has caused in the world.

TEMPERANCE **1602

Temperance is the waiting woman of Lucretia in Chapman's May Day, and provides advice to Leonoro about how to approach her mistress as well as other potential lovers. Though she arranges a meeting with him to give him access to her mistress, her plan is foiled when she mistakes Ludovico for Leonoro and allows him to enter instead. In the final scene, with her "mistress" revealed (as Lucretio, a man), she agrees to a match with Innocentio.

TEMPERANCE **1617

A “ghost character" in the anonymous Pathomachia. One of the eleven virtues that regulate the affections. Intemperance and Stupidity are the extremes of Temperance. He is seventh in the wave of attack against the Vices.

TEMPERANCE **1626

A part taken by one of the Roman soldier masquers performing in honour of Titus's Triumph in Hemminge's The Jews' Tragedy. They appear as Time, Piety, Temperance, Chastity, Friendship, Constancy and Patience. Their masque underlines the royal virtues of Titus and incites him to judgement of the prisoners-of-war.

TEMPERANCE **1636

The name and disguise that Concupiscence uses in Strode's The Floating Island to attract Melancholio and get him to marry her.

TEMPEST ALLMOUTH **1632

A decayed clothworker and suitor to Mistress Ursely for the parsonage’s sake in Hausted’s Rival Friends. He is hoarse when he woos from railing against bishops and the church. When Bully Lively pretends to die, he and the other suitors begin pulling at Ursely as on a rope to win her quickly. When Anteros receives the parsonage deed and Sacrilege Hook drives Tempest off, he and the other suitors flock to Anteros and call him patron. He is driven off by Anteros as unworthy to marry his sister.

TEMPLE, LADY

A "ghost character" in Quarles' The Virgin Widow, whose urine is brought to Artesio for analysis.

TEMPORALITY

Also referred to as the Lords in Lindsay's Satire of the Three Estates. They are a group representing the Second Estate of Scotland, the barons. They process onto the stage at the beginning of the play and remain there as auditors throughout, exiting during the interlude between the parts. The Lord sits among them. When they re-enter for the Second Part, they are led by Public Oppression, or Flattery, and walk backwards. When John the Commonweal addresses the Parliament with suggestions for strengthening the Commonwealth, and Divine Correction orders the Three Estates to control thievery of all kinds, they vow to cooperate and welcome John the Commonweal among them.

TEMPTATION

A "ghost character" in the anonymous Johan The Evangelist. Mentioned as Evil Counsel's brother.

TENACITY

Also known as Father Croust, Tenacitie is a suitor for money in the anonymous The Contention Between Liberalitie and Prodigalitie. He looks like a beggar, but he is determined to find Fortune, and flatter her, with the help of her close servants. When he stops at an inn where he is well known and appreciated, in order to have some rest, there he learns that Prodigalitie is also searching for Fortune. Thus, he decides to go and see Fortune before his enemy does. But Prodigalitie learns about his plans and they start to quarrel over the matter. Then, advised by Vanity, both Money-seekers go to see Fortune, and humbly ask her for Money. Finally, Fortune decides to favor Prodigalitie, which arouses Tenacitie's complaints. But Vanity manages to calm him down, and make him leave in peace. Later, on learning that Money had deserted Prodigalitie, he returns to Fortune, and begs her for her son again. This time he is actually granted the Money, and joyfully promises he will not waste it. But, unfortunately, he ends up being robbed of his Money and murdered by Prodigalitie and his accomplices.

TENANTS

These six characters in Middleton's No Wit, No Help Like a Woman's have functional uses befitting their names, renting from Weatherwise and presenting the twelve astrological signs in a banquet in honor of Goldenfleece.

TENANTS**1634

Two tenants of Bellamie's uncle in Nabbes' Tottenham Court. At the play's outset they are part of the entourage which is helping the uncle search for Bellamie, but they separate themselves from the rest of the party to go sleep. It later turns out that they were sleeping in the same inn where Bellamie and the gallants were carousing that morning, and they inform the uncle of her whereabouts, helping to bring about the play's conclusion.

TENANTS, THREE

The three Tenants in Fletcher's Wit Without Money have taken good care of Valentine's father's estate for years. They are now angry and upset with Valentine for treating them badly and not caring how his irresponsible behavior affects them. They are dependent on the landowner for their livelihood.

TENIENTE

A Spanish judge, friend of Don Pedro in the anonymous Dick of Devonshire. Teniente acts as prosecutor in the trial of Bustamente, and honors the captured Pike for his valor. Before Henrico's trial, he probes the young man's murky and conflicted motives.

TENTERHOOK

A money-lender and creditor to Monopoly, who cuckolds him with his wife, Clare Tenterhook, in Dekker and Webster's Westward Ho. He visits Luce but is dismayed to learn that she also entertains Honeysuckle and Wafer. Informed by Justiniano of his disguises and the wives' plot, he receives his wife's diamonds from Ambush, but is forced by Luce to give them to her as payment for her previous services. He accompanies the other husbands to Brainford, where he witnesses the gallants' humiliation and reconciles with his wife.

TENTERHOOK, CLARE

Tenterhook's wife, in love with Monopoly in Dekker and Webster's Westward Ho. She agrees to Justiniano's invitation to meet the gallants, but leaves the tavern-party suddenly upon learning that Monopoly is back in town. She urges her husband to have Ambush arrest Monopoly for debt, but bribes Ambush with her diamonds to bring him to her privately, and brings Monopoly to the assignation at Brainford. She and the other wives travel with the gallants to Brainford, but are disappointed in the men, who insist on either drinking or smoking to excess. Left alone with the other wives, she suggests they agree to abandon the gallants; she will pretend to be ill so that they will pay for conveyance home. Confronted by her husband, she is rescued by Birdlime, whose possession of the diamonds proves Tenterhook (and the other husbands) to be hypocritical whoremongers. She and the other wives ungratefully condemn Birdlime for enticing their husbands, and then forgive and reconcile with the men.

TENUANTIUS

Another form for Themantius in Fisher's Fuimus Troes.

TEPHIS

The Queen of Cicilia in T.D.'s The Bloody Banquet. This name is used only once in the play. In Act One, we learn that the Queen is locked up by her uxorious husband, Armatrites. She is affected by the charm of Tymethes, but warns him not to make inappropriate advances. She admits to the audience and to her keeper, Roxona, her lust for Tymethes. The Queen puts on a servile display for her husband's benefit, but urges Roxona to contrive a meeting between her and Tymethes. In Act Two, she asks for and receives expressions of secret-keeping loyalty from four Servants. At a lavish banquet, she presents herself–initially silent and always veiled–to Tymethes. She explains to the besotted Tymethes that she cannot possibly reveal her identity. In Act Four, the Queen's identity is revealed to Tymethes. She responds by shooting him to preserve the secret of their clandestine meetings. Armatrites happens upon the scene. Lying, the Queen alleges that Tymethes' plan had been to rape her. Disbelieved, she is accused of fornication by Mazeres, who is pretending to be Roxona. A consolation for the Queen is the killing of Roxona, who the Queen wrongly thinks has betrayed her. She is forced to look upon the quartered body of her lover, Tymethes. In Act Five, she is made to publicly eat the flesh of Tymethes.

TERDAWHEE, ABERGINENNI

A "ghost character" in William Rowley's A Shoemaker a Gentleman. One of the Shoemaker's Welsh cousins.

TER[D]ER

Listed in the dramatis personae of the anonymous Philander, King of Thrace. Characteristics and actions not given in the surviving plot.

TERENCE

I.
Only mentioned in Jonson's Every Man out of His Humour. When Mitis asks Cordatus about the comedy they are about to see, whether its author observes the classical rules regarding the unity of time, place, and action, Cordatus embarks upon a lengthy and learned incursion into the history of comedy. According to Cordatus, the comedy's equal division into acts and scene is done in the Terentian manner. Terence was the second-century B.C. Roman dramatist. Plautus and Terence followed Menander's pattern in comedy. Terence was Plautus's successor and he copied the Greek originals with slavish fidelity. His six plays, which all survive, have served as models for classical perfection to every succeeding generation of comedy-writers.
II.
Only mentioned in Jonson's Poetaster. Publius Terentius Afer (Terence) (195–159 BC) was a writer of comedy. Born an African slave in Carthage, he was brought to Rome as a slave, became a member of the Scipionic circle of Scipio Africanus the Younger, which included Laelius and the satirist Lucilius. Among his major plays are Andria, the earliest of Terence's comedies, Hauton Timorumenos (The Self-Tormentor), Eunuchs, Terence's greatest financial success, Phormio, and Adelphi, considered Terence's masterpiece. After Virgil has Crispinus take an emetic to throw up his bad words, he then prescribes Crispinus to observe a strict and wholesome diet, taking each morning a dose of Old Cato's principles, walk a while till it be digested, then taste a piece of Terence. Virgil suggests that Crispinus should take Terence's phrases instead of medicine.
III.
Only mentioned in Marmion's The Antiquary. Terence was an ancient Roman author. Lionell refers to Terence in a plot to trick Veterano with counterfeit volumes.

TERENTIA

Daughter of Flaminius in Machin's(?) Every Woman in Her Humour. Her choleric father is no hindrance to Terentia, who, although beloved of the patrician soldier Lentulus, prefers the virtuous, though baseborn, orator Tully. When Tully comes to Terentia to court her on Lentulus's behalf, Terentia declares her love for Tully. She insists that neither Tully's birth nor her father's threats to take the matter to the Senate will stand in the way of their marriage. She succeeds in marrying him.

TERENTIUS

Terentius, follower of Sejanus in Jonson's Sejanus His Fall. He has the final line of the play and exhorts Arruntius and Lepidus to learn by the wrong example of Sejanus not to be insolent and grow proud and careless of the gods.

TEREUS

King of Thrace in ?Tarlton's Three Plays in One. Appears in the third playlet. He rapes his wife's sister, Philomele, then cuts out her tongue so she cannot reveal his crime. When his wife learns of his deeds, she and Philomele kill his son, Itis, and serve his head to Tereus on a platter.

TEREUS**1602

Only mentioned in Percy’s A Country Tragedy in Vacunium. Rhodaghond swears that never was Procne revenged upon Tereus as she will be upon Fulvia for striking her in front of Sir Jeptes.

TERILL, SIR WALTER

Sir Walter Terill is the bridegroom of Cælestine and the son-in-law of Sir Quintilian Shorthose in Dekker's Satiromastix. This character's name is borrowed from a real historical figure, Walter Tirel, lord of Poix, who was rumored to have assassinated king William Rufus, but in Satiromastix Sir Walter Terill is rendered as a noble and virtuous character. His happy marriage to Cælestine at the outset of the play is almost immediately threatened by the lecherous king, William Rufus, who commands Terill to present Cælestine at court so that he may deflower her on her wedding night. Terill is tortured by the conflict between his duty to the king and preserving his bride inviolate, but ultimately sees himself as forced to submit to the king's wishes. Cælestine, however, decides to drink poison rather than submit her body to the king, viewing the alternative as a stain of sin that will taint both her marriage and the state, and Terill nobly assents to her suicide. Terill presents the king with Cælestine's body and confronts him with the horror his lechery has engendered. When William Rufus discovers that Cælestine has taken poison rather than relinquish her chastity to any man other than her husband, he repents his actions. When he declares her a truly constant wife, however, Cælestine revives, having unwittingly consumed a potion of her father's devising to make her only appear dead. The king is content now not to interfere between bride and bridegroom, and Cælestine and Terill are happily reunited.

TERMAGANT **1627

Only mentioned in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. Never-good invokes Dr. Faustus, Mephistopheles, Asmodeus, Termagant, and Almeroth of Cantimeropus in his impotent attempt to curse Goggle and Carion.

TERMOCK **1627

An Irish soldier who follows Penia-Penniless in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. He is the "wonder of Redshanks" and fond of his "usquabaugh." He speaks in the comic stage dialect of his country. He wants to be captain of Penia's "tattered fleece" army, but he ends up supporting every other candidate in turn until the choice is made for Higgen. Nothing is seen of him after this in the play.

TERMS OF LAW

Four allegorical representations for the law terms appear in the induction of Middleton's Michaelmas Term: Easter, Hilary, Michaelmas, and Trinity. See under those individual listings.

TERPANDER **1632

An old gentleman, Anteros’s father in Hausted’s Rival Friends. He is deeply in debt to Sacrilege Hook and must try to convince his son to marry the ugly and deformed Ursely. He commands and receives his son’s obedient agreement to marry the girl. Though he owes Hook nothing after Anteros tears up the mortgage papers, he nevertheless pays Hook half the amount in good conscience.

TERRA **1607

She is part of Visus’ grand entrance of III.vi in Tomkis’ Lingua. She wears a gown of green velvet struck with branches and flowers and a crown of turrets upon her head.

TERRELL, JAMES

James Terrell is hired by Richard in the anonymous True Tragedy of Richard III to oversee the murder of the two princes in the Tower of London. Terrell is motivated entirely by a desire for money. Terrell hires Miles Forest to hire assassins. They are Will Slawter and Jack Denten. Terrell coerces Sir Robert Brokenbury into giving him the keys to the boys' cell in the Tower. Terrell informs the assassins that Richard wants the murders to be bloodless. He instructs them to smother the boys. After the murders, Terrell reports back to Richard. See also TIRIL, TYRRELL, and related spellings for this same character in other plays.

TERRESIUS **1636

A Sicilian commander turned pirate captain in Killigrew’s The Princess. He took the infant Lucius with him when Sicily fell on the same day that Nigro took the young Facertes and renamed him Cilius to protect his true identity from the Romans. He believes he will be replaced by the returning Cilius, whom Terresius respects. He only hopes Tullius dies in time to make him heir and not Cilius. He asks the drunken lieutenant for his accounting of the slaves to be sold but gets little satisfaction from the drunk. He has arranged for Tullius’s wife to kill the old man and sends the lieutenant to check on him. Upon learning that some of his men have stolen and sold Cicilia, he resolves to have them hanged. When he learns the identity of Nigro, he befriends the old man and reveals that the pirates have ever been sympathetic to the Sicilian cause. He comes across the shipwrecked Virgilius and the others, fights and wounds Virgilius, but is seriously wounded in return. He is on hand at play’s end to help reveal the true identities of the young people and bring about harmony.

TERROR

Terror is the page of Tyranny in Wilson's The Three Lords and Three Ladies of London. He calls himself 'Regard.' He carries a lance with a pendant of "gules; in it, a tiger's head out of a cloud, licking a bloody heart." The Spanish pages (Terror, Shame, and Treachery) fight the pages of London (Wit, Wealth, and Will)and are defeated.

TERSULUS

A tailor, servant to Philargus in Brome's Love-Sick Court. He is in love with Doris. After Eudyna faints, he is sent to learn of her health from Doris. Doris agrees to marry him if Eudyna marries Philargus. In the fifth act, he runs to get a physician for the drugged Philargus and reveals that Doris enticed Varillus to murder Philargus.

TERTIUS

Tertius is the third choir boy in the anonymous Narcissus. He just wants to leave with his friends. He is the one who explains that they will play a tragedy. Then they exeunt, to enter later as actors to perform the play Narcissus.

TERTZKI

Earl of Tertzki in Glapthorne's Albertus Wallenstein. With his colleague the Earl of Kintzki, loyal supporters of Wallenstein. Completely taken in by the treacherous protestatons of loyalty uttered by Lesle. With Kintzki, Illawe and Newman, he helps to break up the fight between Wallenstein's sons. He later accompanies Wallenstein to Egers with other allies, and with them, is shot by Lesle's Soldiers, denouncing Lesle's treachery with his final breath.

TESEPHON

Allcyane's father in the anonymous Dead Man's Fortune. He wishes her to marry Carynus. With Allgerius, he plots to drug their imprisoned daughters and force them to marry the men their fathers have chosen. The magician Urganda tricks them into believing that they have instead poisoned the women. They are then arrested and brought before King Egereon. He is spared from execution only when Urganda sends faeries to dismiss the executioner. He is then reunited with his daughter and reconciled to her choice of husband.

TESTY

Justice of the peace, uncle and guardian to Millicent in Brome's The English Moor. He has forced her to marry Quicksands but, dismayed by her apparent wantonness, he advises Quicksands not to consummate the marriage until she can "bride it modestly." At Quicksands' feast, he learns privately that Millicent is not really dead, and regrets giving Millicent to Quicksand; he regrets it even more upon the appearance of Quicksands' idiot bastard. When Quicksands learns that his wife has apparently been debauched in the guise of the "Queen of Ethiopia," Testy orders all the participants confined until the mess can be sorted out. The next day, with the help of Rashly and Meanwell, Testy orders Quicksands to make restitution, orders Nathaniel to marry Phyllis, and gives his blessing to the betrothal of Millicent and Theophilus.

TESTY, SIR TIMOTHY

Sir Timothy is an old angry bankrupt knight with two daughters, Sabina and Mirabell in Chamberlain's Swaggering Damsel. Being asked about how much he is to bequeath to his daughter, Sabina, he announces that he is to give her 1,000 blessings, but no money at all. In Act Three, he is informed of the recent events. He flies into a rage and calls her own daughter a whore and he blames Hilts for letting people enter his house. Thus, he asks Hilts to go to look for his cousin Muchcraft to ask for help. He wants to know if entering a house at night might be considered to be trespassing. Being explained about his rights, he sends a bunch of Officers to look for his daughter Sabina. In Act Five, he wants to arrest Valentine but he still has the heart to forgive him if he marries her. With the wedding, he wins a loyal servant and gives his two daughters, Sabina and Mirabell, to Valentine and Fairefaith, respectively.

THAIS **1604

Thais is a courtesan in Daniel's Philotas. In conversation with Antigona, Thais asks Antigona to prove that Philotas really loves her. Antigona tells her of Philotas's secret remarks against Alexander, claiming that the fact that he confided in her demonstrates how much he loves her. Thais sees this as an opportunity to get revenge on Philotas, who had previously rejected her, and takes the gossip to Craterus. Antigona later accuses Thais of having betrayed her confidence; the politic Thais claims that she has really helped her.

THAIS **1618

Only mentioned in Goffe's The Courageous Turk. Thais was a whore and legendary symbol of flattery and lust. She is mentioned by Eurenoses as an example of something a king and warrior should avoid.

THAISA

Daughter of Simonides, wife of Pericles, and mother of Marina in Shakespeare's Pericles. Thaisa is thought to be dead and hurled overboard during a terrible storm at sea. She is recovered by Cerimon who revives her. Thaisa, assuming Pericles is dead, becomes a nun in the service of the goddess Diana. Later, after Diana comes to Pericles in a vision, she is happily reunited with her husband and daughter.

THALAESTRIS **1638

Wife to Meleager in Mayne’s Amorous War. She sends her husband to war insisting that he be valiant and do right by her. She and Orythia refuse the petition of Callias, Neander, and Artops to accompany the ladies to the safe island. She is captured by the Thracians and led in with Orythia, Menalippe, and Marthesia like Amazons in golden fetters pinioned with silken cords. As part of Barsene’s plan, she colors her face “a comely brown" and poses as an Amazon warrior in league with the Bithynians. Orythia, Thalaestris, and Marthesia tease Callias, Neander, and Artops by pretending they are prepared to bed them, but at the crucial moment an alarum sounds (by prearranged sign) that the camp is up in arms and the three men are “captured" by their own soldiers, Macrinus, Lacero, and Serpix, in disguise. In a twist on the ‘bed trick,’ Theagines and Meleager take Orythia and Thalaestris to bed believing they are Amazons rather than their wives. Theagines and Meleager learn from Orythia and Thalaestris that the Amazons intend to turn traitors and side with Thrace now because Archidamus has refused to choose between the two princesses and will remain true to Roxane. Callias, Neander, and Artops capture the four of the “treasonous" Amazons and lead in Orythia, Thalaestris, Menalippe and Marthesia wearing helmets over their heads. When the women remove their helmets (having also removed their Amazon make up), the captains are again made fools. Orthia and Thalaestris laugh at their husbands for having committed innocent fornication and made themselves cuckolds with their own wives.

THALANDER

"Disguised and called Atyches" for the majority of P. Fletcher's Sicelides, Thalander is in love with Olinda. He is "a Fisher," the son of Glaucus and Circe, Glaucilla's twin brother, and Perindus's friend. Because Olinda had previously voiced her hatred for him, banished him from her sight, and "affected" his rival (Mago), Thalander exiled himself to the woods, became a "stranger," and, according to Atyches, died. In the disguise of Atyches, Thalander returned to the Sicilian town (almost one year prior to the play's action) and, on his arrival, conveyed well wishes, Circe's pipe, and an engraved ruby ring to Olinda which he claims that the "dead and dying" Thalander made him swear to give to her. He becomes Perindus's friend and, when the Priest overseeing Olinda's execution "proclaimes" that anyone who "conquer[s]" the "monstrous beast" will gain Olinda as "his prize forever," Malorcha is "loos'd" and "hungry posteth to his ready feast" only to be blinded and killed by Atyches. Directly after this victory he is married to Olinda. He is suspected by Perindus as being very much like Thalander and, despite the fact that Olinda previously scorned Thalander's love, she informs Glaucilla that her heart lies with him. Suspicious that Olinda does not truly love him, Atyches is unable to sleep and, thinking he is alone, reveals his true identity to the night. Perindus overhears him and, thus, Thalander's disguise is blown. Perindus informs Thalander that Olinda is in love with him and the two set out to find her. However, they learn that Olinda is dead and Thalander voices his desire to kill himself. Alcippus accompanies the distraught lover to Olinda's supposed grave but, suspicious of Thalander's intentions, he decides against "leav[ing]" his friend at Olinda's "temple" alone and chooses to "retire" instead. After mourning Olinda's death Thalander "lies down by the rocke" to sleep and, much to his amazement, is awakened after "the Rocke opens" and Olinda is led from it. Alcippus re-enters to find Olinda alive and well, remedies Thalander's disbelief concerning Olinda's existence, and claims that the couple's love "perswades" him "to become a lover." Olinda delivers her story to the two fishermen, Thalander forgives Olinda for her past behaviour, and the two proclaim their love for each other. Alcippus summarizes the "triall[s]" of Thalander's and Olinda's relationship at the play's end, and Thalander (again) expresses his nagging concern that he is only dreaming such a favourable outcome.

THALECTRIS

Thalectris is the name assumed by Spaconia as she enters Panthea's service in Beaumont and Fletcher's A King and No King. Spaconia does not keep her true identity a secret from Panthea for very long.

THALIA

I.
Thalia is the Muse of Comedy in Wilson's The Cobbler's Prophecy. She is writing a pageant, but her pen wears out. She is working hard because nowadays everyone is so base that they are comic. Meanwhile, her sisters Melpomene (Tragedy) and Clio (History) are idle, since in peacetime there is nothing for them to write about. At the end of their scene, Thalia reveals that her pageant depicts Pleasure followed by Sorrow and Pain.
II.
In the anonymous Maid's Metamorphosis, three muses intercede with Apollo for Eurymine. Thalia, the First Muse, assures Ascanio that Apollo will take pity on her case. She invokes the god and asks him to redeem Eurymine from thrall. At his reluctance, she begs him again, promising that, if he shows mercy on the lady, the muses will spread his fame with their tongues. Thalia will then follow the god's command and tell the fairies to give Eurymine woman's clothes. She will dance, with the other muses, for Silvio and Gemulo at the end of the play. The playwright probably mixed up Charities (or Graces) and Muses, because, aside from being representatives of beauty and charm, the Graces were also known to dance with the Muses to Apollo's playing, as well as be messengers for Aphrodite and Eros.
III.
The name Roscius correctly uses to refer to the character otherwise known as Comedy in Randolph's Muses' Looking Glass.

THALIARD

A servant to Antiochus in Shakespeare's Pericles. He is sent to poison Pericles. By the time he arrives in Tyre, however, the Prince has fled.

THAMAR **1587

Thamar is David's daughter and is sister to Absalon in Peele's David and Bethsabe. When her half-brother Amnon rapes her, Absalon takes revenge by having him killed during a country festival.

THAMAR **1597

Appears in scenes 4, 6, 12, 14, 18 of the Anonymous plot of Frederick and Basilea; played by the young actor Charles (Charles Massey), who also played Athanasia.

THAMASTA

Cousin to Prince Palador and sister to Amethus in Ford's The Lover's Melancholy, Thamasta is a beautiful, but very proud and haughty young woman. She has been courted for many years by her brother's friend, the virtuous Menaphon, but her "bosom...is intermured with ice," and she persistently refuses his suit. Because of her disdain, Menaphon leaves Cyprus in despair, only to return after having met a new friend, Parthenophill. When she meets Parthenophill, Thamasta seems to soften toward Menaphon, but is in fact struck with love for his unknown young friend. She asks her maid, Kala, to sound out his desires, but is betrayed when Kala courts him for herself. Left alone with Parthenophill, Thamasta offers him her illustrious hand; she is shocked to discover that 'he' is actually the disguised maiden, Eroclea. Cursed by both Amethus and Menaphon when they discover her apparent looseness with a 'stranger,' she apologizes to Menaphon for her faults and is reconciled to him. She shows how thoroughly her pride has been chastened when she kindly welcomes Cleophila as a sister-in-law and helps to restore Eroclea to her family. Her marriage to Menaphon is one of those blessed by Palador at the play's end.

THANE of CAWDOR

A "ghost character" in Shakespeare's Macbeth. A thane of Scotland. Along with Macdonald, the Thane of Cawdor leads a rebellion against Duncan, and is captured in battle and executed for treason. Duncan rewards Macbeth's valor by bestowing Cawdor's title and property on him.

THARSALIO

Younger brother to Lysander in Chapman's The Widow's Tears. Returned home from Italy, having "drunk too much of that Italian air," prays to the Goddess Confidence to aid him in his wooing of the socially superior and richer Countess Eudora, lately widowed. Tharsalio was formerly her page. He dismisses the Countess's vow to remain unmarried, and his confidence shakes his brother Lysander's faith in a similar vow made by his wife, Cynthia. After initial setbacks, he wins Eudora by having Arsace, a pandaress, extravagantly praise his sexual ability to Eudora. He also arranges the marriage of his nephew to Laodice, Eudora's daughter. Tharsalio has wagered with Lysander on Cynthia's fidelity. He knows of Lysander's feigned death but does not know of his disguised return. Tharsalio discovers Cynthia becoming involved with a soldier hired to guard three crucified prisoners. He decides to avenge his brother's dishonor by stealing one of the bodies. In this way he hopes to get the soldier into trouble. When Tharsalio discovers that this soldier is really Lysander in disguise, he restores the body and alerts Cynthia to the trick, thus allowing her to feign that she knew Lysander all along.

THAUMA

Thauma is a personage in Cynthia's train and a mute character in Jonson's Cynthia's Revels. Thauma attends the revels and retires with Cynthia's retinue.

THEAGINE

Theagine is Lucretio's betrothed, another exile from Cyprus in Chapman's May Day. She spends the first four acts of the play in disguise as Lionello, Leonoro's page.

THEAGINES **1635

Banished Chief Judge of Sardinia, father to Leucanthe and Pausanes, and Memnon’s brother in Killigrew’s The Prisoners. The ancient Sardinian law forced him and Memnon to refuse to aid Sicily for Sardinia may take up arms only for its own defense. During the act four storm, he washes ashore. He reveals to the hermit who finds him that, against the law of Sardinia, he and Memnon sent their infant sons abroad to be trained to be princes. The oracle exposed their treachery, and both Memnon and Theagines were banished until they could find their sons and return. Since then, Theagines has lost his friend, Perseus, been separated from his brother, Memnon, and fears their sons are lost. Later, Theagines finds Hipparchus, wounded, with Leucanthe and binds up his wounds. He receives the medallions from Gillippus and is able to reveal that Pausanes is his long lost son and Hipparchus his lost nephew. He is reunited with his daughter, Leucanthe, and niece Eucratia. At last he learns that the old hermit is none other than his lost brother Memnon.

THEAGINES **1638

A young Bithynian lord, son to Lynestes and husband to Orythia in Mayne’s Amorous War. Sometimes spelled Theagenes. He reports to his king that the battlements are prepared to meet the Thracians. When he learns that his wife has been captured by the Thracians, he despairs that he may never see her again without little Thracian babies gathered about her. Theagines and Meleager are quickly convinced by the arguments of Callias, Neander, and Artops that the Amazon warriors require and desire the Bithynian men to service them and get them children, including the two ‘princesses.’ They therefore go quickly when the Amazon princesses call them to their tent, justifying themselves that, should the ever meet their wives again, they can then exchange mutual forgiveness. In a twist on the ‘bed trick,’ Theagines and Meleager take Orythia and Thalaestris to bed believing they are Amazons rather than their wives. After sex, Theagines and Meleager compare notes. They are surprised that the Amazons had both of their breasts and were “complete women." Theagines and Meleager learn from Orythia and Thalaestris that the Amazons intend to turn traitors and side with Thrace now because Archidamus has refused to choose between the two princesses and will remain true to Roxane. When the truth is revealed, Orthia and Thalaestris laugh at their husbands for having committed innocent fornication and made themselves cuckolds with their own wives.

THEANDER

A young duke in Davenant's The Platonic Lovers. He is brother to Ariola, friend to Phylomont, and lover of Phylomont's sister, Eurithea. Unlike Phylomont, Theander is a natural Platonist. He is shocked by the revelation of his friend's and sister's more earthly natures and is only brought to consider a less exalted notion of love when he ingests a drug administered secretly by Buonateste. Affected violently by this drug, he urges Eurithea to marry him. Puzzled but compassionate, she does so, and then is horrified to discover his lusty motivation. Humiliated by her reaction, he leaves her bedroom, and is soon persuaded by the wicked courtier Fredeline that she was unfaithful to him that same night. Buonateste ensures, however, that Fredeline ultimately confesses the truth, and Theander and Eurithea are reconciled. By this time the drug has worn off, and Theander is back to a more platonic state of mind, but he says that he will "incline in time" to conventional married love.

THEANOR

Prince of Corinth, son of the Queen of Corinth and the King her late husband in Fletcher's Queen of Corinth. He has courted and won the hand of Merione, Leonidas' sister, but his mother and Leonidas take his affianced bride from him to marry her to Agenor, Prince of Argos. Incensed by this and burning with desire for Merione, he accepts his friend Crates' counsel that he rape her before her marriage to Agenor. Having done so, he leaves her before her house, assuming that she will either run mad or will hide her shame. Instead, she openly bewails her rape, so that Theanor (who is present when she is found) must keep up a hypocritical façade of shock at the tragedy. He then becomes increasingly incensed as he watches his mother's growing affection for Euphanes. He mocks the young soldier to his face and maligns him to the Queen, but none of his actions can shake Euphanes' stoical humility or the Queen's fixed love for her favourite. Therefore, on Crates' suggestion, he tries to fix the guilt of Merione's rape on Euphanes by giving a ring he had stolen from her to his mother, who then gives it to Euphanes as a bride-gift for Beliza. As a result of these actions, Theanor is captured and held hostage by Agenor and Leonidas in an effort to convince the Queen to give up Euphanes. He attempts to slander Euphanes to them, but willingly allows himself to be set free when Euphanes nobly comes to offer himself in Theanor's stead. Theanor then compounds his crimes by deciding to rape Beliza before she can marry Euphanes–an idea that shocks even Crates. After Crates is reconciled to Euphanes, Theanor's crimes are discovered and he is captured. In prison he feels deep repentance, declaring himself more than willing to die for his sins. Beliza pretends to demand his death at his trial, but when it is revealed that only Merione was raped it is agreed that Theanor should atone for his crimes by marrying her. Thus, all's well that ends well, at least by the standards of Corinth's rape laws.

THEFT

Also referred to as "Common Theft" in Lindsay's Satire of the Three Estates. He runs into the Parliament while evading capture and is arrested by the Sergeants and hanged.

THELEA

Thelea, a son of the king of Thessaly, is brother to Delia in Peele's The Old Wives' Tale. (The text refers to him as the Second Brother.) Along with his brother Calypha, he seeks to rescue Delia from the sorcerer Sacrapant, but falls under the magician's spell and is enslaved. He is released when Sacrapant is destroyed.

THEMANTIUS

King Lud's son, the younger brother of Androgeus in Fisher's Fuimus Troes. Also called Tenuantius. After their father's death, their uncle Cassibelane has become protector of Britain, the two princes being too young to rule the country. At the beginning of the play, everybody is still pleased with this arrangement. Cassibelane remains the ruler of the whole country with all its little kingdoms, but he confers Troynovant (London) and Kent to Androgeus, and Cornwall to Themantius. During the celebration of the first victory over Caesar, the two princes start a playful fencing match. Two courtiers, Eulinus and Hirildo imitate them, and Hirildo, Cassibelane's nephew, gets unfortunately killed before his uncle's eyes. In his anger, Cassibelane declares that Eulinus should be executed for this, whereas Androgeus maintains that Eulinus as his own kinsman should have a fair trial by the laws of Troynovant. Cassibelane still insists on his authority. Because of this incident, Androgeus and Themantius plan to fight the usurper of their throne. Together with Mandubrace they contact Caesar. Caesar returns with a bigger army, and Androgeus, Themantius and Mandubrace with their Trinobants, Cenimagnians, Segontiackes, Ancalites, Bybrockes, and Cassians join his side. After Eulinus' suicide, Androgeus feels guilty of having raised a civil war. He urges Caesar to make peace with Cassibelane and defers his rights to the throne to Themantius.

THEMIS

Only mentioned in ?Clavell's The Soddered Citizen. Themis is mentioned by Brainsicke as he tries to make Undermine drunk. He explains that "faire Themis" was "a pure Virgin," who kept a Tavern in Mount Parnasus. According to Greek mythology, Themis was a Titanid, daughter to Gaia and Uranus, goddess of custom, assemblies and right order.

THEMYLE

Also identified as Themile in Brome's Love-Sick Court. She is mother to Philocles and Placilla and Governess to Eudyna. Following the Queen's wishes, she has led everyone to believe that Philocles is her son. She tries to ensure that Philargus, not Philocles, will win Eudyna and ensures that he is the first person to see her after she recovers from her swoon. She recognizes Placilla's love for Philocles and cryptically promises to help her. Garula, who repeatedly threatens to expose Philocles's identity, coerces her into helping win Doris's affection for Geron. When it appears that Philargus is dead and Philocles will marry Eudyna, she is forced to reveal his true identity.

THENOT **1581

Like his fellows Colin, Diggon, and Hobbinol, Thenot is a typical figure from the pastoral tradition: a rural worker who is allowed to comment on the vicissitudes of love in Peele's The Arraignment of Paris. His name appears also in Spenser's 1579 work The Shepherds' Calendar, and that may indicate Peele's borrowing from that important work.

THENOT **1608

Thenot is a shepherd in Fletcher's The Faithful Shepherdess. He rejects Cloë because he loves Clorin. Thenot goes to Clorin's bower to declare his love for her, but she rejects him, seeing correctly that her attraction for him lies in her unattainable chastity. She therefore cures him of his love by pretending to seduce him. Thenot returns to the village cursing all women.

THEO:

In the most sustained exchange in the two-page fragment of Wilson’s The Corporal, Theo:, the male, appears to have a Benedick-type banter with a woman known only as Feli:, but whether the two are courting or merely exchanged battle-of-the-sexes observations is not clear.

THEOCLES**1638

Theocles is brother of Artemone, and friend of Lysander in Mead's Combat of Love and Friendship. He is in love with Ethusa but she is determined to reject his suit unless her sister Panaretta counsels her that she should. Panaretta will not do so until Lysander shows some love to her. Ethusa thus refuses to listen to Theocles until Lysander promises to woo Panaretta. Theocles therefore goes to Artemone, Lysander's love, and tells her that Lysander is unfaithful to her. Artemone is furious and rejects Lysander. Theocles tells Panareta of this in a letter which prompts Panareta to counsel Ethusa to love him. When Lysander, later, tells him that the path to Ethusa is now clear, Theocles is grateful, and then admits his treachery. Lysander is furious and they fight; Theocles is wounded. He confesses his wickedness to Artemone, who is angry but forgives him. In the end, Theocles marries Ethusa.

THEOCRINE

Theocrine is the daughter of Malefort Sr. in Massinger's Unnatural Combat. She is also Montreville's former mistress. She is in love with Beaufort Jr., yet is the subject of Montreville's revenge. Montreville, who hates Malefort Sr. for having stolen his mistress, rapes Theocrine, who leaps to her death after the dishonor.

THEOCRITE

Only mentioned in Jonson's Poetaster. Theocritus (c.310–250BC) was born in Syracuse, lived on the island Kos, and spent time in Egypt under Ptolemy II. Theocritus was the creator of pastoral poetry. He wrote about shepherd life and about life in the cities, as well as mythology. After Virgil has Crispinus take an emetic to throw up his bad words, he then prescribes Crispinus to observe a strict and wholesome diet. Virgil suggests ironically that Crispinus should read, with a tutor, the best classical authors, among whom Virgil mentions Theocrite.

THEODOR

Theodor is a colonel in the Duke's army and Archas's eldest son in Fletcher's The Loyal Subject. Theodor explains to Putskie why his father has retired from active service after the Duke's accession to power, observing that his military career is jeopardized by his father's disgrace with the Duke. Theodor revolts at his father's early retirement and insinuates he would take revenge against the Duke. Returning from the war with news of Archas's victory against the Tartars, Theodor requests an interview with the Duke. Theodor is offended when Boroskie instead of the Duke receives him. Archas summons Theodor to his home, telling him he must accompany his sisters at court. Though Theodor opposes his sisters' exposure to the lewd life at court, he agrees to act as their guardian. At court, Theodor introduces Honora and Viola to Boroskie, Burris, and two Gentlemen as if the ladies were horses at an auction. He extols their beauty in vulgar terms and invites Boroskie and the Gentlemen to try to conquer them. When Putskie brings him the news that the Duke has invited Archas to a feast, Theodor suspects a trap and instructs the Ancient to tell the faithful soldiers to lie in attendance. After Archas' arrest, the Ancient, Putskie, Theodor, and the soldiers win their General's freedom. Theodor and his soldiers foment a military rebellion, retiring beyond the city gates and threatening to leave Moscow unprotected. In a final confrontation between the rebel army and Archas, who remains loyal to the Duke's side, Archas accuses Theodor of disobedience and proposes to kill him. When Briskie threatens to kill young Archas if Theodor is not pardoned, Archas forgives his eldest son. The Duke nominates Theodor the new General.

THEODORA

Theodora is the daughter of Eldegrad, the sister of Ganelon and Gabriella, and the aunt of La Busse in the Anonymous Charlemagne. Under the influence of Ganelon (who gives her a magic ring) she marries Charlemagne, whose infatuation with her is caused by the ring. She later engages in an affair with Ganelon's friend Richard. Theodora dies shortly after the birth of her son Lewis, whose father is thought to be not Charlemagne but Richard. Charlemagne lavishes affection on her corpse and refuses to have her buried until Bishop Turpin discovers the magic ring under her tongue and removes it.

THEODORE **1597

Appears in scenes 3, 6, 9, 11, 12, 14, 17, 18 of the Anonymous plot of Frederick and Basilea; played by Mr. Martynn (Martin Slater).

THEODORE

Philomusus in disguise as a French physician in the anonymous 2 Return From Parnassus adopts the name Theodore (perhaps a reference to the celebrated French doctor, Theodore de Turquet Mayerne, who became physician to James I in 1606).

THEODORE **1636

Earthworm's virtuous son, cousin to the bereaved Matilda and loyal friend to the fugitive Eugeny in May's The Old Couple. He is not known in the neighborhood, having only recently returned from studying abroad; his return and his character are the subject of general speculation. Said to be a scholar and a traveler, the fact that he dresses all in black has caused gossip that he may be a conjurer. In fact, he is a paragon, described by his grateful friend, Eugeny, as noble, wise and heroic. His filial piety in rescuing his father from his debilitating addiction to avarice also demonstrates his wit and deep understanding of human nature. He is driven by pity for his father's condition, wrecked by consuming avarice in "body, mind and frame." He delights Earthworm by seeming to be everything his father would wish him to be, dutifully extolling thrift and moderation to gain his trust. He is rewarded with the possession of Earthworm's keys. Theodore's plan to cure his addiction begins to work, first humoring him, then secretly feeding him a sleeping draught to prevent his obsession with counting his gold all night long. He has enlisted the help of his father's servant, Jasper, in the next stage of his cure. Having delegated the arrangement of mysterious disguises and reinforcements, Theodore visits Eugeny in his dismal hiding-place. He attempts to encourage his despairing friend by advising moderation, but brings bad news. Eugeny's uncle, believed to be working for his nephew's pardon, is in reality secretly laying traps to capture him, and offering bribes to corrupt justice to ensure Eugeny's execution and his inheritance. Eugeny is devastated by this betrayal of kinship and Theodore laments with him for the loss of the golden age of virtue and family values. A sweet, sad song in the forest interrupts them. Eugeny is struck by its melancholy beauty; Theodore goes to investigate. He reports the sight of a lady as fair as her voice and Eugeny is appalled to recognize Matilda, the tragic lover of the man he killed. They leave to avoid meeting her. Back at his father's house, Theodore enlists Earthworm's poor neighbors in the next stage of his plan to cure his father. He pretends to be Jasper's fellow servant, tells them that Earthworm has already repented his miserly ways and is determined to make amends. Claiming Earthworm is too embarrassed to meet them, or receive their thanks, Theodore invites them to take their first weekly gifts of gold and corn from Earthworm's store. The neighbors are thrilled, offering praise and blessings for Earthworm's reported religious conversion into a good and charitable neighbor. He next meets Artemia, with many expressions of mutual respect and willingly takes comforting messages from her to Eugeny, glad to be able to relieve his friend's melancholy. A fire in his father's barn allows Earthworm to see how ready his neighbors now are to rush to his help. Earthworm is finally moved to repent his avarice and selfishness to Theodore's delight. Earthworm's recollection of his neglected duty to his orphaned niece, Matilda, prompts Theodore to identify her with the forlorn 'nymph' in the woods. He offers to find her and bring her home and cherish her, as a kinsman should. Theodore finds her and the cousins are reunited. She is at first unwilling to return home with him, to bring her desperate grief into their lives, but is persuaded by Theodore's wise words that her solitary life is prolonging her sadness to no point. Again he stresses the need for moderation. She accepts his invitation to make her home with them, to find comfort in their hospitality and cherish her memories while letting go of her despair. He next accompanies Artemia to the forest with an urgent warning that Eugeny must flee his uncle's treachery. They arrive too late to prevent his arrest. All characters are present in the final scene when all difficulties are resolved by Scudmore's emergence from disguise. Theodore promptly fetches Matilda to be reunited with her love. He has the satisfaction of seeing his father's new generosity in action as Earthworm insists on hosting the lavish double wedding to follow.

THEODORE ARTLOVE

"A compleat gentleman," as he is called in the list of characters in Nabbes' Covent Garden. Artlove is the protagonist of the play's main romantic plot, in which he woos Dorothy Worthy. Though Dorothy initially expresses no desire for a husband, Artlove eventually wins her heart with the help of her brother, Young Worthy, whom he has befriended after saving Young Worthy from being robbed. Artlove is an embodiment, almost a parody, of the ideals of Platonic love, in which virtue and high-flown rhetoric are distinctive features. In this sense, he is contrasted with Hugh Jerker, protagonist of the play's romantic subplot, who represents a more sensuous, libertine sensibility celebrating pleasures of the flesh.

THEODORET

Prince of Austracia, Brunhalt's older son and brother to Thierry in Fletcher and Massinger's Thierry and Theodoret. He has a legitimate daughter, Memberge, and a bastard son, Leonor. He is loyally served and advised by his noble friend Martell. Outraged by his mother's depraved life, he instructs her to enter a convent, which provokes her flight to his brother's court. Realizing that she will try to instigate a war between them, he journeys to France with his loyal friend, Martell, and his daughter, whom he proposes to offer as a hostage to Thierry. Both brothers believe Brunhalt's repentance and are reconciled. His party stays to celebrate the royal wedding of Thierry and Ordella. The brothers go hunting together and debate Protaldy's reputation. Theodoret has already agreed with Martell to stage a demonstration of Protaldy's cowardice, which succeeds. Brunhalt plots his murder during his brother's wedding celebrations. He is stabbed in the back by Protaldy as he sits in state with Thierry, both watching the revelers dance. His mother subsequently excuses his murder with a fantastic tale to Thierry that Theodoret was a changeling child, a humble gardener's son substituted by her for a baby that miscarried. She later retracts the story when Thierry proposes to Theodoret's daughter, believing her to be no blood relation. Brunhalt's murder of Thierry is ostensibly a plot to place Theodoret's illegitimate son on the throne of France.

THEODORO **1616

Theodoro is the name taken by Theodosia in Fletcher's Love's Pilgrimage while she is disguised as a boy.

THEODORO **1641

A "ghost character" in Shirley's The Brothers. Impoverished brother to Don Carlo and father to Felisarda.

THEODORUS WITGOOD

A young spendthrift gallant residing in Leicestershire in Middleton's A Trick to Catch the Old One. He has fallen on hard times because of nagging debts in the City of London and the loss of his lands to his Uncle Pecunius Lucre when he forfeited his mortgage. Witgood contrives with the Host of a local tavern and the Courtesan, disguised as a wealthy widow, Jane Medler, to improve both their financial straits by "tricking" his uncle, his creditors, and another London usurer Walkadine Hoard. Witgood returns to London, pretending to be engaged to Medler (and therefore entitled to a share of her wealth), leaks this information through the Host (disguised as Medler's servant) to his Uncle Lucre and his creditors. Because of his various creditors' desire to benefit through the impending marriage, Witgood is able to use this as leverage to have his debts forgiven. Pretending to be outraged when the Courtesan marries Walkadine Hoard, Witgood negotiated to further improve his own financial situation through an impending marriage to Joyce, Hoard's daughter, whom he wins over both Moneylove and Sam Freedom.

THEODOSIA **1616

Theodosia is the daughter of Alphonso and the sister of Philippo in Fletcher's Love's Pilgrimage. She disguises herself as a boy in order to travel to Barcelona in search of Mark-Antonio, who has deserted her. She stops at Diego's inn and pays for both of his beds so she can be assured of privacy. However, when Philippo arrives at the same inn, he is intrigued by Incubo's description of the beautiful youth and desires to see him. Incubo convinces the disguised Theodosia to let Philippo sleep in the same room, where they discover that they are brother and sister. Theodosia tells Philippo of her love for Mark-Antonio, and Philippo promises to help her. They travel with Diego to Barcelona, and along the way meet a group of travelers who have been robbed. They are moved by the disguised Leocadia and agree to have her travel with them. Theodosia realizes that Leocadia is a woman, and confronts her with the truth. She hears Leocadia's declaration that she is engaged to Mark-Antonio, and reviles herself as a deceitful seductress. When Theodosia sees Mark-Antonio wounded during the street fight, she faints, and is attacked by her brother for thus distracting him and allowing Leocadia to escape. Luckily, the Governor promises to find both Mark-Antonio and Leocadia and bring them to his house. Once there, Mark-Antonio, convinced that he is dying of his wound, confesses that he was engaged first to Theodosia and then to Leocadia, at which point Theodosia reveals herself and is reconciled with Mark-Antonio. Finally, in order to reconcile Alphonso and Sanchio, Theodosia along with Leocadia stand between their fathers while Eugenia insists that if the men wish to fight, they must fire through their daughters.

THEODOSIA **1637

As sister to the King of Naples in Shirley's Royal Master. Having rebuffed the advances of Montalto, Theodosia is courted by the Duke of Florence. She is cruelly maligned by her former suitor, accused of unchastity and dishonesty. She also faces competition from Domitilla for the duke's affection. When Montalto's sins are revealed, Theodosia's name is cleared and her relationship with the duke re-established.

THEODOSIUS **1631

Theodosius, the emperor, has relinquished most of his power to his sister Pulcheria in Massinger's The Emperor of the East. His sister introduces Theodosius to his future bride, Eudocia. He marries her, but soon discards her when he believes that she has cheated on him. His evidence is scant. Having sent an apple to his wife, he is shocked to find that she has sent the apple on to Paulinus. The Emperor orders Philanax to kill Paulinus, but the order is not carried out. Theodosius rejoices in the end when he discovers that both Eudocia and Paulinus are innocent.

THEODOSIUS **1635

A "ghost character" in Shirley's Coronation. Theodosius is the deceased king of Epire. Of his three children, only Sophia has been raised royally. The sons–Demetrius and Leonatus–were each sent to separate households to be raised free and safe from the political intrigues of Cassander.

THEODRICK

Also identified in Brome's The Queen's Exchange as "Embassador," Theodrick is Favorite to Osriick the King of Northumbria. While negotiating the marriage between Osriick and Bertha, Theodrick falls in love with Mildred. After concluding the marriage negotiations, he shows Mildred's picture to Osriick, who also falls in love with her. Osriick banishes Theodrick from the court and confines him to his house under guard. When Eaufride and Theodwald suspect that Ethelswick and Edelbert are abusing Osriick (actually Anthynus), they send for Theodrick. Theodrick announces that being separated from the King has been torturous, apologizes for loving Mildred and relinquishes any claim to her.

THEODWALD

A Northumbrian Lord in Brome's The Queen's Exchange. Suspecting that Ethelswick and Edelbert are abusing the melancholic Osriick (actually Anthynus), he helps Eaufride force them out of the court. He is present at Bertha's marriage to Anthynus.

THEOLOGY

In Lupton's All For Money, Theology enters immediately after the Prologue and complains that at present theology is no longer studied but for money and that the holiness of the clerical vocation is defiled by greediness, like everything in contemporary society (the play's central thesis).

THEOPHILUS **1584

Theophilus in Harrison's Philomathes' Dream encourages Philomathes to recount his dream. He suggests that "dreams are more than fantasies," and that they can sometimes be prophetic. After Polumathes has interpreted most of the dream and suggested a reading of Erasmus of Rotterdam's biography of John Collet (the founder of St. Paul's, who appears in the dream as Philomathes' guide), Theophilus intervenes in a debate between Ephorus and Theopompus about proper oration. Theophilus suggests that Theopompus's speech tends to be overblown, but that Ephorus's speech is too reticent. Æmulus then praises Theophilus for demonstrating the best and most balanced kind of speech. (The attribution of any lines to Theophilus is uncertain, however, since the speakers' names in this part of the play are often not given)

THEOPHILUS **1602

A "ghost character" who does not appear as a ghost in the Anonymous The Merry Devil of Edmonton. A deceased friend of Salomon, the sexton, Theophilus is buried in the churchyard of Enfield. Surprised by the gamekeeper and his men, the poachers hide in the churchyard. When the sexton hears noises, he believes that it is the ghost of his friend.

THEOPHILUS **1620

Theophilus is a zealous persecutor of the Christians in Massinger and Dekker's The Virgin Martyr. He later converts to Christianity and is tortured. Harpex attempts to damn him, but Dorothea's spirit arrives in time to ward him off.

THEOPHILUS **1637

Rashly's son and Lucy's brother in Brome's The English Moor, an impulsive man of extreme moods. He was betrothed to Millicent, but her uncle married her to Quicksands. Angered by the rakes' plan to cuckold Quicksands, he fights them, and is rescued by the disguised Arthur. He makes up with Nathaniel, only to become enraged again upon learning of their mock wedding masque, fearing Quicksands will blame him for the prank. Hearing of Millicent's disappearance, he worries that Quicksands has murdered her and vows to kill him. Distraught at the later word of Millicent's supposed death, he welcomes her "kinsman" (Dionisia in disguise) warmly. He swoons with joy when the disguised Arthur delivers Millicent, and again when his father arrives, unaware that he has survived Dionisia's murder attempt. He and Millicent are betrothed in Testy's court.

THEOPHILUS**1638

The foster son of Goodlove, cousin of Raven, and lover of the Bride in Nabbes' The Bride. As the play opens, he is pining for the Bride, whom he secretly loves, but who is about to marry Goodlove. Goodlove tries to reassure him, but when the Bride reciprocates Theophilus's affections, the young couple flees, and Goodlove reveals that he had intended all along to give the Bride to Theophilus. The couple arrives at Squirrel's tavern, where they argue when Theophilus expresses guilt over his abandonment of Goodlove and says he will not marry the Bride without the full consent of her parents and Goodlove. Raven arrives and urges them to flee to the country, falsely telling them that Goodlove has disinherited Theophilus. Before they can leave, the blades arrive (secretly prompted by Raven) and nearly carry off the Bride, but Theophilus fights them and forces them to surrender their weapons. Theophilus begins to suspect Raven's sincerity, and when Justice Ferrett arrives and tells him of Goodlove's plans, he resolves to return to Goodlove and find out the truth. Later, while traveling together, Raven tries to kill Theophilus, but Theophilus accidentally stabs Raven instead, then prevents the Bride from being raped by Kickshaw. Theophilus and the Bride run off together and finally show up again in the play's final scene. Then it is revealed that Theophilus has ingratiated himself with the Bride's father and gained his blessing, and Raven reveals that Theophilus is actually Goodlove's biological son.

THEOPOMPUS

I.
Theopompus in Harrison's Philomathes' Dream diagnoses Philomathes early on in the play as suffering from melancholy, which then turns out to be due to his preoccupation with last night's dream. Later, after Polumathes has interpreted most of the dream and asked for Philoponus to read aloud a translation of Erasmus of Rotterdam's biography of John Collet (the founder of St. Paul's, who appears in the dream as Philomathes' guide), Theopompus interrupts to claim that he could make a "flaunting oration" on Collet. He is interrupted in turn by Ephorus, who chastises him for overzealous oration and suggests that Theopompus is in "need of a bridle." (The attribution of this second set of lines to Theopompus is uncertain, however, since the speakers' names in this part of the play are often not given).
II.
Theopompus has played a central role in the confrontation under discussion at the start of Harrison's Philomathes' Second Dream, and is the primary speaker in recounting the incident for Polumathes. A group of "jolly fellows" challenged Theopompus and a number of other students to a "solemn disputation...for the silver pen"; the students declined, but the challengers continued to harass them. Theopompus plays a minor, interrogatory role in the discussion of Philomathes' dream, and makes a number of brief, supportive contributions to the critique of current conditions at St. Paul's school.

THERIDAMAS

I.
A Persian lord in Marlowe's Tamburlaine Part 1. His king, Mycetes, sends Theridamas with 1,000 horse to apprehend the upstart Tamburlaine. Once Cosroe usurps Mycetes' crown, he intends to join with Theridamas' army to consolidate his power. Theridamas, however, set upon Tamburlaine's 500 foot soldiers, and in parley recognizes the Scythian's strength and charisma and joins forces with Tamburlaine. Together with Tamburlaine, he fights to aid Cosroe to the Persian crown. He then assists Tamburlaine to usurp Cosroe immediately thereafter. In parley later with the Turkish emperor Bajazeth, he reacts to the Turk's pomp by desiring to defeat them and take away their wealth and power. He helps defeat the Turk and takes Bajazeth's crown from the empress Zabina for Tamburlaine. He himself wears the crown of one of the Turk's contributory kings. Tamburlaine later crowns him king of Argier. Outside Damascus, he calls for the Soldan of Egypt to be spared for Zenocrate's sake. At play's end, during the coronation, he is first to hail Zenocrate queen of Persia, and Tamburlaine sends him off to his kingdom to rule.
II.
King of Argier in Marlowe's Tamburlaine the Great, Part 2. He meets Tamburlaine at Larissa plains to join forces with him against the Turk. He gives up his crown to Tamburlaine, promises his support, and receives his crown again. When Zenocrate dies, it is Theridamas who restores Tamburlaine to his senses. He and Techelles besiege Balsera. He parleys with Balsera's captain and orders his pioneers to raise earthen walls around the city as a siege weapon. As the city falls, he and Techelles find Olympia trying to commit suicide. Theridamas falls in love at once and takes her to Tamburlaine. After the Turks are routed at Aleppo and Tamburlaine is incensed against Calyphas, Theridamas begs for the boy's pardon. Later, he begs Olympia to love him and when she refuses threatens to rape her. Instead, she tricks him into murdering her. Grief stricken, he promises to entomb her royally. He accompanies Tamburlaine to Babylon where they defeat the governor and hang him on the wall. Theridamas is given the first shot at him and wounds him. When Tamburlaine falls ill, Theridamas is first to lament. He is present at Tamburlaine's death and assists in the coronation of Amyras.

THERSAMNES

I.
The Prince of Persia in Suckling's Aglaura (first version). He is at odds with his father and has secretly married Aglaura at the beginning of the play. He is captured and taken away before his wedding night begins and forced to give Aglaura up. Later he escapes and tries to convince Aglaura to consummate the marriage. He comes to the cave where Aglaura is waiting for him, but she mistakes him for the King and fatally stabs him.
II.
In the "happy ending" second version, the character engages in much the same action. The Prince of Persia in Suckling's Aglaura (second version). He is at odds with his father and has secretly married Aglaura at the beginning of the play. He is captured and taken away before his wedding night begins and forced to give Aglaura up. Later he escapes and tries to convince Aglaura to consummate the marriage. He comes to the cave where Aglaura is waiting for him, but she mistakes him for the King and stabs him. However, he is not killed and is not angry with her. Zorannes gives him the throne, and he gives Zorannes the opportunity to give sentence against his father the King. He points out, though, that he would then be bound to avenge his own father's death. He then cedes the throne back to his father.

THERSITES

I.
Appears first nearly naked, with a club, having just left the siege of Troy in Udall's? Thersites. He boasts of all the Greek, Arthurian, and biblical heroes that he has terrified or will terrify. He bullies Mulciber the blacksmith into making him a full suit of armor (after they have argued about whether he wants a sallet–which means either a helmet or salad). Later he mocks his mother behind her back. He fights a snail with retractable horns (his only victory), and threatens and then runs from the soldier (Miles) and hides amongst his mother's skirts. He bullies his mother into healing the young son of his old enemy, Ulysses. Finally, after another bout of boasting, the play ends with his being chased away by the soldier.
II.
A deformed and scurrilous Greek in Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida. Thersites provides a running stream of invective, satire, and low humor aimed at the proud and powerful Greeks.
III.
Thersites is a foul-mouthed malcontent among the Greeks in Heywood's 1 The Iron Age, who is given to sarcastic verbal attacks at all around him. When Menelaus informs Helen of his intention to visit Crete and orders her to entertain the visiting Trojan Paris, Thersites chortles over the customary ignorance of cuckolds. At Troy, he lashes out at both Greek and Trojan nobles and is beaten first by Achilles for his insulting remarks, then by Troilus for labeling all Greeks and Trojans fools for fighting over such a "drabbe" (whore) as Helen. Thersites delivers the epilogue to the play, taking delight in his survival, a survival that will allow him to see Pyrrhus, Penthesilia, Sinon, and others in the play's second part.
IV.
A sarcastic coward in Heywood's 2 The Iron Age, Thersites and his new friend Synon are attacked by Penthesilea and run away. During the fighting in Troy he and Synon briefly capture Cassandra. He cynically joins in persuading Menelaus to take Hellen back, and kills the aged Hecuba in cold blood. He survives the hazards of the voyage back to Greece and rejoins Synon in Mycene, where the two act as mocking chorus of the bloody events surrounding Agamemnon's homecoming. Cethus kills him during the marriage of Pyrhus and Hermione.

THESEUS

I.
Theseus is the Duke of Athens in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. His decision to uphold Athenian law with regard to Hermia's arranged marriage to Demetrius leads to the attempted elopement of Hermia and Lysander as well as the series of magical events that occur in the forest. He recants his harsh ruling and allows for the play's happy ending. Theseus weds Hippolyta at the play's close and the wedding party watches the rude mechanicals' performance of Pyramus and Thisbe. There is no explanation why this Greek king is rendered a Duke in the play. In Mythology, Theseus was a hero second only to Heracles, and it was he who slew the Minotaur and defeated Procrustus and dismantled the Procrustean Bed. His marriage to Hippolyta would produce a son, Hippolytus, who will be the cause of Theseus' tragic demise (making the fairy blessing of bride beds ironic in this larger context). None of Theseus' latter history, including his tragic second marriage to Phaedra, appears to have occurred to Shakespeare in crafting this comedy.
II.
Theseus is the Duke of Athens in Shakespeare's Two Noble Kinsmen. At his wedding to Hippolyta he is met by three widowed Queens who beg his aid in retrieving and burying the bodies of their dead husbands, slain by the forces of Creon of Thebes. Theseus acts upon the widows' petitions and fights Creon, taking two prisoners-Palamon and Arcite-in the process. He orders the best care given to these two noblemen, both of whom fall in love with Emilia, sister to Hippolyta. Because the situation seems irresolvable, Theseus banishes Arcite and keeps Palamon in prison. But Arcite remains in Athens and Palamon is helped to escape, leading ultimately to a challenge between the two men and their knights. As victor, Arcite is to wed Emilia; as loser, Palamon is to die. But Arcite is trammeled by a horse just before Palamon's execution, and Theseus gives Emilia as wife to Palamon.
III.
This prince of Athens is honored by Hercules at Olympia in Heywood's The Silver Age, and accompanies him on the hunt of the Nemean lion and the Erimanthean boar. He then goes with Philoctetes to stand by Perithous when the latter is married to Hypodamia, and after the battle with the centaurs accompanies Hercules to rescue Prosperpine. Daring to attack Cerberus before Hercules arrives at the gates of the underworld, he is wounded, but survives to accompany Hercules in the harrowing of Hades.
IV.
Theseus serves Meleager and is one of Jason's Argonauts in Heywood's Brazen Age.
V.
A "ghost character" in Heywood's 1 The Iron Age, Theseus is a legendary king of Athens. Heywood's Address to the Reader asserts that Theseus had "ravished Hellen in her minority," but later Helen remarks upon Theseus's only having sought kisses and other displays of affection
VI.
Only mentioned in Cokain's Trappolin. Mattemores wishes he were like Theseus, and could conquer his lover rather than be conquered by her.
VII.
Only mentioned in Davenport's New Trick to Cheat the Devil. Thesius (so spelled) is mentioned by Master Changeable when he describes Slightall, once he has convinced him to go and sleep in the haunted chamber in order to rid them of the evil she-spirit: "One like enough, were Hurcules [sic] alive/ With him in Thesius [sic] stead to enter Hell." According to Greek mythology, Thesius was son to Aegeus, king of Athens, and to Aethra, daughter to the king of Troezen. He was sent on several missions, which he completed successfully–in one of them he had to defeat the Minotaur. Theseus was the most famous human hero in Greek mythology.
VIII.
Only mentioned in Randolph's Muses' Looking Glass. Tragedy contended "in [her] full state" at Theseus' tomb.

THESPION GYMNESOPHIST **1615

Only mentioned in Tomkis’ Albumazar. Albumazar’s magical cant includes this allusion.

THESSALA **1604

Thessala is one of Alcumena's waiting women in the anonymous Birthe of Hercules. She is kind to Mercurius when he takes the shape of Sosia–since she is in love with the latter, as she confesses to her lady. She also suffers for her beloved one when he is 'struggling' in war, and she remains faithful to him.

THESSALA **1610

I.
Alcmena's servant in Heywood's The Silver Age, who helps support her mistress's account of the night with Jupiter disguised as Amphitrio.
II.
Maid to Alcmena in Heywood's The Escapes of Jupiter. Thessala is sent to fetch the golden bowl given by the Teleboans to Amphitryo; the fact that Alcmena has this bowl in her possession before he has given it to her gives poor Amphitryo his first indication that something strange has been happening in his house.

THESTYLIS **1581

Thestylis is the haughty country lass whose rejection of Colin leads to his death from the pain of unrequited love in Peele's The Arraignment of Paris. Her punishment, devised personally by the love goddess Venus, is to fall madly in love with an ugly Churl who spurns her affection, thus treating her to the pain she inflicted upon the shepherd Colin when she spurned his love.

THESTYLIS **1630

An old nymph in Randolph's Amyntas, sister to Claius and wooed by the foolish augur Mopsus. Thestylis is greatly saddened by her family's overwhelming misfortunes: her brother a fugitive, her nephew insane and her niece despairing in love for Damon. She herself regrets her single life, and lacks any suitor but the hopeless Mopsus. She plans, however, to make the most of his courtship, and enjoys teasing him and indulging his follies. She successfully intercedes with Laurinda to help Amaryllis and is loyal in comforting Amyntas. When Iocastus woos her for his brother, he absurdly offers as jointure an estate in fairyland. She fails to recognize her homecoming brother Claius, after his long absence, but welcomes him as a physician offering to try to cure Amyntas. When Amyntas is cured, and wise again, she risks losing Mopsus, who is in fear of catching wisdom. Dorylas, owing Mopsus a favor, tricks Thestylis into accepting Mopsus's proposal by imitating auspicious birdsongs. She is happy, finally to agree to wed, although rather cynical about her prospects with such a foolish husband. The prospects improve, at least financially, when Dorylas further tricks Iocastus out of half his estate for their jointure. Her last action is again selfless: she kindly accompanies Urania to Ceres's altar to vow virginity, which is happily prevented, however, by Amyntas's solution of the oracle.

THETIS

I.
Only mentioned in Jonson's Every Man out of His Humour. The reference is to Thetis's son, the Greek hero Achilles, who fought in the Trojan War. When Fastidious Brisk reports to Puntavorlo and his party the episode of his "brave" combat with Signior Luculento, Fastidious Brisk compares the incentive of their fight with the grand determination that caused Achilles to fight in the Trojan War. In the Iliad, Achilles quarreled with Agamemnon, the leader of the Greeks, over a captive slave-girl whom he loved. It is to be inferred that the cause of Fastidious Brisk's duel with Luculento was a dispute over a lady. However, when asked, Fastidious Brisk gallantly says that they should let the cause escape, dismissing the reason for the fight as irrelevant and concentrating on a detailed description of the duel.
II.
A "ghost character" in Heywood's 1 The Iron Age, Thetis is a sea nymph and the mother of Achilles. After the death of Hector, Paris takes some consolation in knowing that Troilus still lives to fight the "bloody sonne of Thetis."
III.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Narcissus. Cephisus mentions Queen Thetis when he first addresses to his son Narcissus, explaining that the sun has gone, and that "Phebus withqueene Thetis is a doinge." According to Greek mythology, Thetis was a goddess of the sea, daughter to the sea god Nereus and to Doris. She, like Phoebus, had the gift of prophesy. Besides, she had also the power to change her shape at will.
IV.
Sings one of the two treble parts in the Introduction of Hausted’s Rival Friends. She desires Phoebus to remain in bed with her though Venus entreats him to arise.

THIA

A nymph in the anonymous Tamar Cam. She was played by one of the young actors who doubled as one of Tarmia's two sons.

THIDIAS

Thidias is a follower of Caesar in Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra and is sent by him to see if Cleopatra will betray Antony. Cleopatra appears to be listening to him, but when Antony enters and sees Thidias kissing her hand, he becomes enraged and has Thidias whipped and sent off.

THIEL

Only mentioned in Jonson's The Alchemist. Mathlai, Tarmiel, Barborat, Rael, Velel, and Thiel are the names of spirits taken from Elementa Magica by Pietro d'Albano. Subtle recommends to the gullible Drugger the best solutions for the location of his shop. He suggests that Drugger should write the names of Mathlai, Tarmiel, and Barborat on the eastern side of his shop, and Rael, Velel, and Thiel on the northern part. Subtle claims these are the names of the Mercurial spirits, meant to frighten flies from the boxes of tobacco. Implicitly, the god of commerce, Mercury, was supposed to protect the shop.

THIERRY

King of France in Fletcher and Massinger's Thierry and Theodoret. Brunhalt's younger son and brother to Theodoret. An autocratic but honorable ruler in the first instance, he welcomes his mother to court and believes her allegations of outrageous libel by his brother, and disbelieves the rumors of her promiscuity. He makes Protaldy Lord General of his army. Brunhalt's feigned repentance leads to a reconciliation between brothers, averting war. He invites Theodoret's party to stay and celebrate his marriage to Ordella. Martell's plot to expose Protaldy's cowardice is explained to him and he leads the court in mocking the coward when the story is made public. He is in love with his wife, both devastated at his impotence and delighted at her demonstration of chaste devotion to him. After Theodoret's murder, he is gullible enough to believe Brunhalt's account that his brother was a low-born changeling, the actual son of a gardener, and rewards Protaldy for killing him. Brunhalt further persuades him that his need for heirs is more important than his celibate marriage. And he is gulled into visiting the hermit-magician Le Forte (Lecure, in disguise) for advice. He takes his horoscope to the magician, and is told to sacrifice an innocent subject to ensure future sons. Not realizing that his designated victim is Ordella, he persuades her of her religious and patriotic duty to lay down her life, but flees in horror when she first agrees, then reveals her identity–only Martell's quick thinking saves the young bride by hiding her and convincing Thierry that she has died indeed. He tries to kill himself, but Martell prevents him. Believing that his bride is dead, and his niece is no blood relation, he answers Memberge's demand for justice by offering her marriage. He refuses to accept Brunhalt's admission that Theodoret was his true brother after all and that the marriage will be incestuous. His mother plots to kill him. He is given a handkerchief that will deprive him of sleep. His suffering, both from the symptoms of tormented insomnia and the drastic but futile remedies of court physicians, is described at length before he reappears on a couch, raving. Evidence of Brunhalt's treason is brought to him. He pleads with Brunhalt to repent, relent and be a true mother to him, but she scorns him. Ordella is brought out of hiding and forgives him. They make peace. He dies bequeathing the kingdom and his sister to Martell, and their children will preserve his dynasty.

THIEVES **1624

Brigands in Drue's The Duchess of Suffolk. Attack Duchess, Nurse, Child, Cranwell and Dr. Sands in Europe as they leave Bertie and Perecell and head for Santon. They injure Cranwell and rob the Duchess. Bertie, disguised as an outlaw, draws most of the thieves away with a false report of passing rich merchants; he then attacks and binds the remaining thief, rescues the Duchess and assists the wounded Cranwell.

THIEVES **1634

"Ghost characters" in Rutter's The Shepherds' Holiday. Eubulus claims that he was looking to deliver the king and queen's baby to a plain honest man that would be careful of it when he was frightened by thieves who infested the place. Furthermore, Eubulus claims that "'tis probable" that the thieves carried away the abandoned baby.

THIEVES **1638

A merry gang led by Tamoren in Suckling's The Goblins. Disguised as devils, they make a good living by robbing and kidnapping passers-by, whom they force to confess to the sins characteristic of their position in life (the courtier is accused of venality, the young man of lechery, etc.). After their leader reveals his true identity as the son of an aristocratic family in defeat, the thieves are presumably disbanded–but not before Tamoren has secured a pardon for them all.

THIMBLE

A "ghost character" in Sharpham's The Fleire. A tailor named by Antifront as one of the many customers of the prostitutes Felecia and Florida.

THIMBLE, GREGORY

A "ghost character" in Davenant's News From Plymouth. Gregory Thimble is one of the creditors who send letters to Cable.

THINBEARD, TIMOTHY

A servant of Thomas Gresham in Heywood's 2 If You Know Not Me. He doubts the honesty of John Gresham. Later, Timothy is condemned to death for stealing, but is aided by Hobson.

THINJAWS

A fantasy character in (?)Speed’s The Converted Robber. In his boasting, Autolius claims that he can make an old usurer’s man, Thinjaws, sup a dish of air and have the old man pay for it.

THIRSIS

A "ghost character" in Fletcher and Massinger's The Prophetess. A shepherd who is to help Alexis, Egon, and Ladon with the country entertainment planned for Diocles.

THIRSTY**1615

Thirsty is Gripe's man and, with Nice, serves as comic relief in S.S's Honest Lawyer. Unlike many clever comic servants, Thirsty does not have a great deal to do, although he is part of many scenes. His humor mainly involves sexual innuendos about the female characters. He does help Benjamin and Robin scare Nice when the latter is sent to seek help from Sir Bare Notwithstanding.

THIRTENS **1599

A “ghost character" in Ruggle’s Club Law. Though mentioned in the dramatis personae and in the text, he does not actually appear on stage. One of the twenty-four Electors for the Burgomastership. The name suggests a reference to Godfrey Twelves, who was one of the Cambridge town officials when the play was presented. Thirten is Ketlebaen’s gossip or godfather and a leatherworker. He is not at the roll call of electors and is fined a mark, which is a groat more than his name.

THISANDER **1636

Probably a mistake or cant term for Silvander in Killigrew’s Claricilla. Manlius relates how, when Silvander discovered that his love for Claricilla had turned him into a traitor to his king, on that day did Thisander fall.

THISBE **1596

I.
Thisbe is the female lead in Pyramus and Thisbe, the play performed by the rude mechanicals at Theseus' wedding in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Francis Flute, the bellows mender, plays the part.
II.
Only mentioned in Jonson's Poetaster. Thisbe is the heroine of the classical Greek legend of Pyramus and Thisbe. The story is narrated in Ovid's Metamorphoses, Book IV. Pyramus was the handsomest youth, and Thisbe the fairest maiden in all Babylonia, where Semiramis reigned. Their parents occupied adjoining houses, neighborhood brought the young people together, and acquaintance ripened into love. By a misunderstanding, Pyramus thought his Thisbe dead, and he killed himself. When Thisbe found her dead lover's body, she stabbed herself with his sword. The story of the young lovers ends tragically and the red mulberry tree is a symbol of their love. When Tucca refers to Chloë as Thisbe, he deplores her sad fate, namely that of having such a boorish husband. Paradoxically, Tucca compares Chloë's unfortunate fate of having a homely husband with Thisbe's tragic fate of dying for her love.
III.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Narcissus. Clois mentions Thisbee when, declaring her love for Narcissus, she refers to her faithfulness in the following terms: "As was to trusty Pyramus truest Thisbee / So true to you will ever thy sweete Clois bee." For the story of Pyramus and Thisbee, see "Pyramus."

THISBE **1619

A "ghost character" in Fletcher's The Humorous Lieutenant. Thisbe is sent a package by the bawd Leucippe instructing her to send twenty young maids for the use of the court.

THISBE **1629

Thisbe in Randolph's Praeludium is the character performed by the Lover, who is a member of the hungry troupe of actors performing at the Gentleman's house in exchange for food and clothing. The Player's Thisbe apparently languishes in flames for the Gentleman's affection. The Lover complains that the object of his/her affections seems to be deaf to her (Thisbe's) desperate plea for help, which consists in asking for some money to mend his (the actor's) boots.

THOMAS **1589

Thomas is a rustic friend to Margaret of Fressingfield in Greene's Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. He accompanies the fair maid, Richard, and Joan to the fair at Harleston. There, he buys presents for Joan and invites her to a tavern for "a pint of wine or two."

THOMAS **1593

Son and heir to the Earl of Arundel in Shakespeare's Richard II. A member of Bolingbroke's army, which, the Earl of Northumberland tells us at the end of II.i, is making its way to England.

THOMAS **1608

A "ghost character" in Markham and Machin's The Dumb Knight. Prate and Lollia's servant who is summoned but never appears during the near-discovery of Lollia and Alphonso's assignation.

THOMAS **1615

Sebastian's son and Dorothy's twin brother in Fletcher's Monsieur Thomas. Thomas belongs among the 'roaring boys' of Renaissance drama. He has gained a veneer of sophistication on his European travels (hence his sobriquet, 'Monsieur Thomas'), but at the slightest provocation reverts to quarreling, wenching, drinking, swearing and other forms of wild-oat-sowing. He loves Mary, who reciprocates but has determined to reject him because of his follies. After rescuing Francis from the Physicians, Thomas pretends penitence before an unconvinced Mary. He treats her to a drunken serenade, but is frightened by Madge when he tries to climb to Mary's window; Mary mocks his fall. He maddens his father by pretending sobriety, but then regains some of his regard by claiming already to have bedded all the women Sebastian considers marrying. Disguising himself as his twin sister Dorothy in order to gain access to Mary, he is delighted when he is not only invited into Mary's bed but also entreated by Valentine to visit Cellide among the "handsome wenches" in the nunnery. However, Mary has learned of his disguise and plants her maid Kate, disguised as a Moor, in her bed to frighten him. It works, and Thomas calls Kate a "she-devil." Leaving her house, he meets Hylas, who mistakes him for Dorothy; he convinces Hylas to marry him. He then invades the convent in Dorothy's guise and convinces his aunt, the Abbess, to let him bring Cellide forth for an hour. Through his help, Cellide marries Francis and Dorothy consents to marry Hylas. Finally, Mary and Sebastian admit that they adore him, and he gains both a bride and his father's estate in the play's happy ending.

THOMAS **1615

A fantasy character in Tomkis’ Albumazar. Antonio, completely confused by meeting Trincalo swearing that he is Antonio, and terrified by Trincalo’s threat to stab him if he maintains the fantasy that they are both the same man, tells Trincalo that he must be Peter, Thomas, or William, what you please. Aside, Antonio considers it a strange negligence to have lost himself.

THOMAS **1640

Servant to Underwit in Cavendish & Shirley's Country Captain. Gets Captain's regalia and books for Underwit. Since Underwit is "playing' at being a Captain, Thomas brings him a book of Shakespeare's plays. Entrusted with the care of the "insane" Engine. Drinks with the group at the tavern and with the footman sent with a letter for Sir Francis.

THOMAS ASHBURNE

An English merchant and younger brother to John Ashburne in Heywood's The Captives. En route to Florence with news for his brother concerning a new-found fortune, Ashburne is blown off course by a storm and lands in Marseilles. Leaving his Factor in charge of the ship and its men, Ashburne is about to explore Marseilles when he notices Raphael, Treadway, and the Clown passing by. He overhears the Clown telling Raphael and Treadway about the discovery of Palestra's true identity, particularly when the Clown says that she is John Ashburne's daughter. After Raphael and Treadway exit, Ashburne stops the Clown and asks to be taken to the Ashburne Raphael, Treadway and the clown were discussing. The Clown agrees, and Ashburne witnesses the reunion of Raphael and Palestra/Mirabel, and then overhears Mildew reveal that Scribonia is in fact his long lost daughter Winifred. As John Ashburne is about to give Scribonia/Winifred to Treadway, Thomas Ashburne steps forward and is reunited with his daughter and brother. He delivers the letter to John Ashburne which announces the restoration of John Ashburne's fortune as well as a sizeable inheritance. He then agrees to join with his brother and the two couples and return to London. The departure of the Ashburne brothers, Raphael, Mirabel, Treadway, and Winifred is delayed, however, by the resolution of Friar John's murder amongst the Sherrif, the Abbot, Friar Richard, the Duke of Averne and Dennis.

THOMAS AYRE

Thomas Ayre is among the many who petition Mistress Jane Shore for relief or redress in Thomas Heywood's 1 Edward IV. He obtains from her a pardon for his son.

THOMAS BADLUCK

A "ghost character" in Quarles' The Virgin Widow. Pertenax has a bond from him.

THOMAS BARBER

Barber and gossip-gatherer to Pennyboy Junior in Jonson's The Staple of News. He buys him a position as a clerk in the Staple of News office. He brings the news of the Staple's demise and of Picklock's lawsuit to Pennyboy Junior and witnesses, from a hidden vantage, Picklock's proposal to Pennyboy Junior to retake Pecunia from Pennyboy Canter. His testimony helps to expose Picklock.

THOMAS BEAUFORT

I.
Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter in Shakespeare's Henry V, is the half-brother of Henry IV and therefore Henry V's uncle. He serves the function of English ambassador in II.iv, when he brings Charles VI Henry's challenge to cede the crown of France or prepare for war. Exeter also conveys a message to the Dauphin, reiterating Henry's threat that he will repay the Dauphin's scornful gift to him with war on France. When the governor of Harfleur surrenders, Henry puts Exeter in charge of the town.
II.
Thomas Beaufort, Duke of Exeter in Shakespeare's 1 Henry VI, is the great-uncle of King Henry VI. After Henry tries to make peace between Richard Plantagenet and the Duke of Somerset, Exeter in soliloquy predicts that the consequences of the Yorkist versus Lancastrian dissent bodes ill for England. Exeter also sees Henry's youth as a problem for the nation. See "EXETER."

THOMAS BERKELEY, SIR

A knight in Marlowe's Edward II. On Mortimer's command Sir Thomas Berkeley takes charge of Edward II from Leicester and leads the recently abdicated king under arrest to Berkeley Castle. Shortly afterward, Mortimer orders Berkeley to hand Edward II over to Gurney and Matrevis.

THOMAS BITEFIGG, SIR

Father to Mrs. Jane in Cartwright's The Ordinary. He wishes his daughter to marry Andrew, the son of Simon Credulous, because he is wealthy, but she wishes to marry Littleworth instead. At the end of the play, he confesses his avarice on what he supposes to be his deathbed to a person he supposes to be a confessor (in reality Shape in disguise). He ultimately agrees that Andrew would have been a disastrous son-in-law and agrees to Jane's marriage to Littleworth.

THOMAS BODLEY, SIR

Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Bodley is mentioned by Sir Cupid Phantsy when, on his second visit to Doctor Clyster, he tries to teach him how to write poetry: "Look you, Doctor, you must first think what you would write of, for the pairing of her left little finger's nail would be matter enough to write volumes to fill libraries beyond Bodley's or the Vatican." Sir Thomas Bodley (1545-1613) founded the Bodleian Library in Oxford, in 1598.

THOMAS BOUTCHER

Thomas Boutcher is a friend of William Smallshanks and is loved by Constantia Sommerfield in Barry's Ram Alley. He takes Constantia into his service disguised as a page, thinking that "he" is a servant recommended to him by Constantia, whom he describes as his "noble mistress." He assists William in his plan to regain his lands from Throat, lending him forty shillings and supporting his plan to pass the courtesan Francis off as Constantia. Boutcher finds himself falling for the rich widow Changeable Taffeta, but resists her because he claims that he has been told by a fortuneteller that a widow would endanger his life, soul, lands and reputation. Boutcher goes with Constantia to tell Throat the news that William is to be married to the rich Sommerfield heiress and wants Throat to be his steward. He later goes to speak to Taffeta and is rebuffed by Adriana; Constantia advises him to woo (i.e. to bribe) the maid to get to the lady. At Taffeta's request Boutcher humiliates Captain Face, who is made to get on a tavern table and behave like a performing animal. William tells Boutcher that he should not bother with Taffeta because Constantia is in love with him, but this does not stop Boutcher from trying to hang himself when he realizes that Taffeta is to marry another man. William assists Constantia in reviving Boutcher, and explains that he, and not Sir Oliver, has married Taffeta. Constantia—still in disguise as a page—offers to help Boutcher to marry Constantia Sommerfield, swearing to bring her to him. When Lady Sommerfield demands to know where her daughter is, Constantia reveals herself and declares her love for Boutcher. They are betrothed.

THOMAS BRIGHTMAN

Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Brightman is mentioned by Signor Jealousia as he is telling Doctor Clyster the details regarding the reason why he believes his wife is being unfaithful to him: "I read Brightman's book of proving the pope Antichrist with so many hornes." Thomas Brightman is the author of the book A Revelation of the Apocalypse (1611).

THOMAS BULLEN, SIR

Thomas Bullen is Anne's father and the Viscount Rochford in Shakespeare's Henry VIII.

THOMAS CASH

Thomas Cash is Kitely's cashier and confidence man in Jonson's Every Man in His Humour. According to Kitely, the merchant raised the foundling boy deposited at his door as if he were his son. Kitely christened him by his first name, Thomas, and the surname Cash, suggesting his trade. At Kitely's house in the Old Jewry, Cash enters following his master and Downright. After receiving instructions from Kitely regarding the business, Cash exits to run some errands. At Kitely's warehouse, Cash enters with Kitely, reporting the business of the day to his master. When Kitely asks him to keep an eye on his wife while he is away, Cash promises to do so. However, it seems that Cash is lamentably inefficient in this watchdog activity. While the gallants are with the ladies, Cash is mostly out of the room, and he only enters during the brawl when the ladies cry out for help. When Kitely enters, however, he finds Cash trying to part the fighters. Like a devoted man of confidence, Cash informs Kitely that Bridget admires Edward Knowell. When Kitely is summoned on a false pretext, Cash is brought in to guard the ladies, but he ends in accompanying Dame Kitely to Cob's house. It seems that Cash's allegiance lies more with his mistress than with his benefactor. It is understood that Cash attends the confusion scene happening before Cob's house and goes with the entire party before the judge, where all differences find a good resolution.

THOMAS CAVENDISH

Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Cavendish is mentioned by Sir Conquest Shadow when he is telling Doctor Clyster about his imaginary fights at sea: "Methinks I'm sailing about this our globe and do discover more than ever Magellan, Drake, or Cavendish did, and make greater fights, and then come home with sails of silk like Cavendish, ..." Thomas Cavendish (1555-1592) was known as 'the Navigator'. He sailed around the world in 1586-88 and returned to England, enormously rich. This voyage was known as the Golden Voyage, and after it, Queen Elizabeth knighted him.

THOMAS CHENEY

A supporter of Woodstock and his brothers in the anonymous Thomas of Woodstock. Cheney brings news and messages on several occasions from King Richard to Woodstock in his house at Plashy and to Anne o'Beame: he reports to Anne how extravagantly Richard is living, and brings the "blank charters", instruments of Richard's new, unprecedented tax policy, to Woodstock to sign. (On this occasion, he also disabuses the Courtier of an embarrassing mistake.) Cheney brings Woodstock the double news that Anne is sick -news which prompts him to send away his wife to Anne's bedside - and that some "country gentlemen" are planning to bring a masque in his honour to Plashy; at the last minute, Cheney realizes that mischief is planned, and tries to warn Woodstock, but he is too late. In the final battle, Cheney fights on the side of York and Lancaster against the King and his followers.

THOMAS CRANMER

Priest in Drue's The Duchess of Suffolk. Thomas Cranmer, reformist Archbishop of Canterbury, burned at the stake in Oxford, 1556. Enters as Latimer and Ridley are being led to execution, recants his return to Catholicism, and vows to burn his hand in the flames for betraying him; he is taken to prison as Latimer and Ridley are taken to the stake.

THOMAS CROMWELL

I.
He first appears in the anonymous Thomas Lord Cromwell having been studying, explaining that his only wealth is his learning. He tells his father's blacksmiths to stop hammering because it disturbs his thinking. When his father reprimands them for not working, young Cromwell throws money at them as recompense. Accused by his father of wasting money, he explains that one day he will be very rich and have a massive palace. Alone, he muses on his humble origins that hold him back and speaks of the effects of time-how the humble rise and the mighty fall. While he is doing this Master Bowser enters offering Cromwell his first appointment, that of secretary to the house for English merchants in Antwerp. In Act2 Cromwell is in Antwerp. He is at work on the accounts, but announces that money is not what he is looking for; he is looking for new experience. He sends a messenger (the Post) to Frankfurt to prepare for English travelers on their way to Florence. When he hears Mistress Banister weeping because her husband has been arrested by the Governor, he agrees to try to dissuade Bagot from pursuing her husband . When she leaves he comments on the effects of the stars and fickle fate. Cromwell tries to persuade Bagot to show warmth to the Banisters. When he explains to Bagot that gain is not something that causes him (Cromwell) to act Bagot tells him that Cromwell is seen as a hypocrite. Rather than fight the accusation, Cromwell plans to leave Antwerp and travel. He declares that he rejects falsehood and "brokerie" and asks Hodge, who has come from England to see him, to accompany him to Italy. Act 3 opens with Thomas and Hodge begging at each end of a bridge in Florence. They have been robbed by the Bandetti and are freezing cold. Friscibald, the Florentine merchant who has forgiven Banister his debts and who loves England, gives them all the money he has on him, even though he does not know them. Thomas expresses his deep gratitude, promises to repay him when he can and announces that he is off to Bononia where he hopes to rescue the Earl of Bedford whom the French are holding and threatening to kill. Cromwell with Hodge his servant visits the Earl of Bedford in Bononia, who is besieged in an inn, disguised as a Neopolitan who has promised the French he will deliver Bedford to them without shedding a drop of blood. In the besieged inn, Cromwell explains to Bedford that they cannot escape by force but they can by policy. He persuades Bedford to change clothes with Hodge who will remain behind while Bedford pretends to be Hodge. Alone, he regrets that he will have to leave Hodge in the hands of the French but that to do so is to do less evil than allowing the higher-born Earl to be killed. He places Hodge in Bedford's study and announces to the Governor of Bononia announcing that all is as he promised. He requests safe conduct to the Mantua port and takes his reward. From Mantua he sends a message to the Governor that he and Bedford have escaped and that Mantua will renege on the truce with Bononia if Hodge isn't released. (This they do.) Several years of travelling pass and Cromwell next appears in London as Secretary to the Master of the Rolls. The Master (Sir Christopher Hales) makes clear that he owes his success to Cromwell and promises to find a position of state for him. At a banquet Hales holds, Cardinal Wolsey asks for Cromwell's opinion of the European courts he has visited. Cromwell categorizes them as those governed by lust and those by riot and drink, and that England "laughs [them all] to scorn." Wolsey then makes Cromwell his private secretary, announcing that Cromwell will continue to rise. In Act 4, the Chorus explains that the play is to be about Cromwell's rise and fall and that Wolsey had died. Gardiner, formerly Wolsey's man and now Bishop of Winchester, the Dukes of Norfolk, and of Suffolk, Sir Thomas More and Sir Christopher Hales discuss the disgraced Cardinal's plots against the state. They ask Cromwell for Wolsey's correspondence and on his knees he hands it over, explaining that he grieves Wolsey's death but not his fall. Suffolk explains the king will reward Cromwell for his fine behaviour and Bedford, recognizing Cromwell as the man who saved him from the French, promises to commend him to the king. Later in the same scene Suffolk knights Cromwell in the king's name, Norfolk names him to the king's privy council and Bedford comes in appointing him Master of the Rolls. Cromwell modestly accepts the appointments. The three take him to the king, while Gardiner stays behind to announce his envy of Cromwell and his intention of having him killed. Soon Cromwell is very powerful and walks though London followed by lords and other attendants. Hodge goes before to get any beggars out of the way and everyone to stand. Cromwell recognizes the inn keepers Seely and his wife in the crowd, remembers he owes them money, repays the debt, promises the amount of the former debt every year, He invites them to dinner that day. He sends a servant to tell Friscoball, whom he also spots in the crowd, to come to dinner. He acknowledges that Gardiner dislikes the dissolution of the monasteries that Cromwell has instigated but explains that the abbots and friars were representatives of the Antichrist, did no work and took the fat of the land. He then sees his father in the crowd and falls on his knees begging his blessing. He sends a servant to get his father to come into his house. At the meal he looks for his father and tells him there is no need for him to uncover his head. He remembers the exact amount he owes Friscoball for the help he provided in Florence. He gives him money with the promise that he will settle all his debts. He addresses Goodman Seely with thanks for all the help he gave him when he was poor. Later he is summoned to Lambeth by the Gardiner and other lords. On the way a messenger gives Crowell a letter from Bedford (warning him not to go to Lambeth.) which he places in his pocket without reading it. At Lambeth he leaves his barge and walks through columns of halberd-bearing soldiers. The sergeant at arms arrests him and Cromwell orders his men not to draw their swords in his defence. He is led off to the Tower, acknowledging the weeping Bedford and warning Norfolk that it will be soon be his turn to fall. In the Tower he reflects on the fact that he was second in power only to the king, remembers the Bedford's letter and comments that if he had given way to the pleasure of reading a letter from a friend he would not have been arrested. When the nobles visit him in his prison Cromwell has Sir Ralph Sadler take a letter to the king explaining that Gardiner is the disloyal traitor. Cromwell tells the nobles to explain to the king that Gardiner was the sole cause of his death, and gives the same message to his son who comes to visit him. When Bedford reprimands Gardiner for quarrelling with and thus disturbing Cromwell just before his death, Cromwell declares that Gardiner does not disturb him. He embraces Bedford. When Sdaler returns with the king's reprieve Cromwell is already dead: Gardiner had deliberately hastened the execution
II.
A "ghost character" in Dekker and Webster's Sir Thomas Wyatt. As Guildford Dudley awaits execution, he observes that the Bishop of Winchester seems to take pleasure from his and Lady Jane Grey's deaths, just as the bishop had earlier relished the fall of Thomas Cromwell, one of Henry VIII's chancellors and later Earl of Essex.
III.
Only mentioned in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. Anus says that Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex destroyed nunneries ("such zealous bawdy-houses!") because he was a eunuch.

THOMAS CURTIS
A wealthy alderman of London in the anonymous Captain Thomas Stukeley. He is married to Bess and known in the play for his trademark oath, "bones of a dead man." Despite being favorably disposed to Vernon, he marries his daughter Nell to her beloved, the English Captain Stukeley. For Stukeley, however, the marriage merely is a means to finance his campaign in Ireland and various other foreign expeditions.

THOMAS DENIS, SIR

A "ghost character" in the anonymous True Tragedy of Richard III.Sir Thomas Denis is reportedly a western gentleman who fights alongside Richmond at Bosworth Field against Richard III.

THOMAS, DUKE of CLARENCE

I.
He is the second son of Henry IV in Shakespeare's 2 Henry IV. King Henry tells him to guide his brother, Prince Hal, when Hal becomes king.
II.
Thomas, Duke Duke of Clarence in Shakespeare's Henry V is the second son of Henry IV, brother of the Duke of Bedford, the Duke of Gloucester and Henry. He appears at Troyes in V.ii but is not listed in any edition of the dramatis personae.
III.
Thomas, the Duke of Clarence is Henry IV's son in ?Dering's The History of Henry the Fourth. He is one of the younger sons. Henry tells Clarence not to neglect his eldest brother Hal. Near the end of the play, Clarence attends his dying father. Clarence also informs Hal about Henry's health.

THOMAS EARL of SURREY

A "ghost character" in Shakespeare's Richard III. Supporter of Richard III. The night before the Battle of Bosworth, Surrey and Lord Northumberland try to cheer up Richard's soldiers, and during the battle Surrey and Norfolk lead the first wave of Richard's forces.

THOMAS ERPINGHAM, SIR

Despite his "good white head" which Henry suggests would grace a soft pillow in England better than the battlefield in Shakespeare's Henry V, Sir Thomas Erpingham is a loyal and determined soldier in Henry's army. On the eve of the battle at Agincourt, Henry borrows Sir Thomas' cloak and, thus disguised, wanders among his soldiers.

THOMAS, FRIAR **1588

I.
When old Friar Anthony is threatened with death in the anonymous 1 Troublesome Reign of John, Friar Thomas agrees to show the Bastard where to find the monastery's gold. But when the chest is opened, it contains a hiding nun, not a thousand pounds.
II.
One of the monks of Swinstead in the anonymous 2 Troublesome Reign of John, Friar Thomas (probably the same as the Friar Thomas of Part 1), enraged by John's depredations on the church, resolves to murder him while he is lodged in the abbey. He poisons a cup, and drinks from it himself in order to beguile the king; both die.

THOMAS, FRIAR **1604

A monk who serves as Duke Vincentio's confidant in Shakespeare's Measure for Measure. He agrees that the Duke clearly has the power to "unloose this tied-up Justice when you pleased." It is Friar Thomas who helps Vincentio to disguise himself as a monk and take the identity of one Friar Lodowick.

THOMAS GARGRAVE, SIR

An English officer in Shakespeare's 1 Henry VI. He serves with Talbot and Salisbury at the siege of Orleans. The young son of the Master Gunner of Orleans manages to kill both him and Salisbury with a single shot.

THOMAS GILTHEAD

A goldsmith in Jonson's The Devil is an Ass. He prides himself on his ability to lure nouveau-riche citizens with easy credit and then cheat them. He tries to have Fitzdottrel arrested for defaulting on the ring, but is persuaded to release him in order to take part in a plan of Merecraft's to produce and promote the use of forks.

THOMAS GODDARD, SIR

The real name of the Miller in [?]Wilson's Fair Em, the Miller's Daughter.

THOMAS GRESHAM

A merchant in Heywood's 2 If You Know Not Me. Gresham makes a risky deal with the King of Barbary, securing exclusive access to Barbary sugar while the King lives. Later, he squabbles with Ramsey over a property they both claim to own, finally agreeing to settle the suit amicably. Next, troubled that merchants have nowhere to meet besides the open street, and inspired by portraits of influential men and women, he plans a new structure for trading. As the Exchange nears completion, however, Gresham is saddened by the loss at sea of the lavish artwork he had commissioned for the edifice, and stunned to learn that the King of Barbary has been slain–and his large investment is lost. Nevertheless, the Queen herself is greatly impressed by his trading project, names it the Royal Exchange and knights Gresham for it.

THOMAS GREY, SIR

I.
Sir Thomas Grey is a traitor to England in Shakespeare's Henry V. Along with Cambridge and Scroop, Grey works to promote French interests. After asking the men for their advice regarding the punishment of a petty traitor, Henry reveals that he has discovered their plot, and that he plans to punish them with as little mercy as they have shown to the petty traitor. After he is arrested, Grey claims to be glad to have been detected before he had done any harm. The three traitors are executed on Henry's orders. In history he was the second son of Sir Thomas Grey of Berwick.
II.
Agrees with Cambridge in his claim to the throne, and vows to help execute the King in Munday, Drayton, Hathaway, and Wilson's Sir John Oldcastle. His name is spelled Gray in this play.

THOMAS HORNER

Horner, an armorer in Shakespeare's 2 Henry VI, tells his apprentice Peter Thump that the Duke of York is the rightful heir to the throne. When Peter testifies to his master's treason before King Henry, Horner offers to provide a witness against Peter, and the two men are sentenced to single combat at Gloucester's recommendation. Horner is vanquished and confesses to the treason before he dies.

THOMAS HOWARD

Thomas Howard, titled as the Earl of Surrey, is Buckingham's father-in-law in Shakespeare's Henry VIII. Sent as deputy to Ireland as safeguard against his interference in the plot against Buckingham, Howard returns to promise revenge for Buckingham's death.

THOMAS (TOM) HOYDEN

Elder son to Hoyden and supposed half-brother to Timothy in Brome's The Sparagus Garden. He is Hoyden's heir, but Tim describes him as "a clown all over and incurable." He speaks in a broad West Country accent, and is known for roaring. Tim sends Coulter to Thomas in Taunton when he discharges him, but Thomas soon appears in London seeking his brother. In order to frustrate Tim's foolish plans, he presents himself to Striker as his nephew in Tim's place. When Striker demands further proof of his supposed status, he seeks his brother to find the warrant of the latter's parentage. He then quarrels with Sir Hugh and his confederates. When they drug him and make off with Timothy, he accuses them as cozeners before Touchwood. In the end, he is the agent by whom Touchwood discovers that Tim is actually his son, and thus the agent of the plot's happy ending.

THOMAS KAY

The second of the two fathers in Randolph's Thomas Randolph's Salting. Also spelled Key. His part may have been lost or never scripted.

THOMAS KITELY

Thomas Kitely is a London merchant who is jealous of his wife in Jonson's Every Man in His Humour. At Kitely's house in the Old Jewry, Kitely enters with Cash and Downright. After dispatching Cash on some business errands, Kitely shows his displeasure at Wellbred's company of frivolous gallants. Dame Kitely enters and Kitely interprets her care for him as hypocrisy. However, Kitely seems distinctly aware of the new contagious disease of jealousy and its potential danger to his marriage. At his warehouse, Kitely enters with Cash, whom he instructs to keep an eye on his wife and the gallants during his absence, since he is called to the city on business. At Justice Clement's house, Kitely enters with Cob, who reports on the gallants' visit to his house. Hearing that Wellbred's friends are still there, Kitely hurries to his house. However, when he enters upon the brawl, the party disperses. Kitely reprimands his sister for her loose behavior and is displeased at her defense of a certain special gentlemen, whom he later identifies as Edward Knowell. At his house, Kitely is having dinner with his wife, his sister, and Wellbred. He is lured outside on a false pretext, but re-enters furiously, angry at having been deceived. In the meantime, his wife had left to Cob's house, inferring that her husband had a secret assignation there. Being under the impression that Dame Kitely was meeting her lover furtively, Kitely exits in a rage. Before Cob's house, Kitely enters to find Knowell and his wife there. While Dame Kitely accuses her husband of adultery, because she thought he was there for an assignation, Kitely thinks that Knowell was his wife's lover. Kitely exits with the entire party of misled people to take their case before the judge. In the final revelation scene, Kitely is reconciled with his wife and both see that their jealousy obscured their better judgment.

THOMAS LITTLETON, SIR

Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Littleton is mentioned by Doctor Clyster when he is explaining to Sir Cupid Phantsy that he can see he is getting worse, and, thus, he is going to put him on a 'reading' diet: "I prescribe you Littleton's Tenures to read in French, with Lambarde's Justice of Peace, Dalton, Crompton, and Fitzherbert, Pulton's Statutes, and Coke's Reports." Sir Thomas Littleton (1407?-1481), a lawyer of the Inner Temple in London, was the author of the Tenures, a complete survey of English land laws.

THOMAS LITTLEWORTH, SIR

A "ghost character" in Cartwright's The Ordinary. Littleworth's father, he is in prison for debt and therefore does not appear in the play.

THOMAS LONG, SIR

Friend of Moll Cutpurse in Middleton and Dekker's Moll Cutpurse, The Roaring Girl. Sir Thomas and Sir Beauteous Ganymede overhear Ralph Trapdoor saying that Jack Dapper was being held for ransom for his gambling debts; they tell Moll, who saves him. Sir Thomas joins her, Jack Dapper, Sir Beauteous, and Lord Noland when they are accosted by Trapdoor and Tearcat disguised as poor soldiers and by the cutpurses. Moll explains to him and the others the practice of canting and the profession of cutting purses.

THOMAS LOVELL, SIR

Lovell in Shakespeare's Henry VIII was supposedly one of several names on Buckingham's "death list" if King Henry had died during a recent illness. Lovell is in attendance at Buckingham's execution and asks the Duke's forgiveness.

THOMAS MANTLE

A mute character in (?Chettle and) Munday's Downfall of Robert Earl of Huntington. Thomas Mantle is one of the actors in the frame who enters to put on the play. He is pointed out to Little Tracy as the actor who plays Robin Hood. (See "ROBIN HOOD").

THOMAS MERRY

Tavern keeper in Yarington's Two Lamentable Tragedies. At the start of the play, Merry laments his lack of financial prosperity. Beech and the Neighbour visit his tavern and drink a can of his beer, which they praise as the finest in London. They console him by saying his fortunes will improve with time. After Beech boasts of his own modest prosperity and savings, Merry begins to plan how he might acquire the money Beech is not using. Alone, Merry plans how to murder Beech. He realizes he will also need to murder Beech's boy, since the boy will know that Merry called Beech away from his shop, as well as ensure the silence of Rachel and Harry Williams. He goes to Beech's shop and persuades Beech to return to Merry's tavern, on the pretext that friends have asked for him. As Beech ascends the stairs, Merry strikes him on the head fifteen times with a hammer, killing him. When Rachel and Harry Williams investigate the disturbance and discover what Merry has done, Merry makes both vow to keep the murder a secret. He discusses with Rachel the dangers that Williams and Winchester pose to them; he then vows to kill Winchester in order to ensure his silence. He goes to Beech's shop and finds Winchester sitting outside. He orders the boy to go into the shop and then strikes him seven times on the head with his hammer, leaving the hammer embedded in Winchester's head. Merry flees, worried that the clamour the boy raised may endanger him. Merry, plagued by growing guilt, enlists Rachel to help him hide Beech's body and decides to conceal it in the tavern until he can find a more permanent hiding place. They take the body to a lower room in the tavern and cover it with sticks. Merry tells Rachel to clean up the blood and then burn the cloths. Later, Merry meets Harry Williams and asks if he has kept Merry's crime a secret. He gives Williams money and his cloak and promises further help so long as Williams remains silent. He notes the commotion outside Beech's shop and, to avoid suspicion, goes over and asks questions about Winchester's condition. Back at the tavern, Merry receives a bag from Rachel and prepares to dispose of Beech's body. He tells Rachel to fetch him a knife so that he can cut off Beech's head and legs and carry them away in the bag, and then return for the remainder of the corpse. Rachel returns with the knife but cannot stay as Merry begins to cut the body, binding the arms with Beech's garters. After Truth addresses the audience, Merry prepares to depart with Beech's torso to dispose of it in a ditch by the waterside. He asks Rachel, when she reenters, to help him put the torso in a bag and to clean up the blood from his butchery. Having disposed of Beech's torso, Merry along with Rachel uncovers Beech's hidden head and legs, places them in his bag, and leaves again to dispose of them, warning Rachel not to reveal anything. Later, Merry asks Rachel about the Neighbours' searches and she tells him about their attempt to discover the purchaser of the bag. Merry is relieved that Salter's man failed to identify Rachel as the bag's purchaser and that the hammer's owner does not remember who borrowed it. Merry tells Rachel that he met Williams earlier but Williams could not be persuaded to join them for dinner; he did vow to keep their secret, though. That evening, Merry is awakened by the Constable and Watchmen, who arrest him for the murders of Beech and Winchester. Merry confesses to the murders but claims that Williams and Rachel are innocent; the Constable reveals that Williams has confessed what he knows about the murders, though. Merry is led to execution with Rachel by Officers and the Hangman. At the top of the Hangman's ladder, Merry publicly confesses Rachel's innocence in relation to the murders and asks God to forgive him for his part in the murders, confessing that he never hated Beech but only desired Beech's money. The Hangman then turns him off the ladder.

THOMAS MORE, SIR**1595

I.
Sir Thomas More is presented throughout Chettle, Dekker and Munday's Sir Thomas More as a learned, pious, compassionate, and good humored man. He first appears as one of the Sheriffs of London at the Court of Sessions, where he has the cutpurse Lifter steal a purse from the pompous and self-righteous Justice Suresby, in order to be able to give Suresby the same admonishment against carrying large sums of money that the justice had given Smart. During the May Day riots of 1517, he addresses the ringleaders of the uprising with a plea for order, and he convinces them to surrender to the king, promising that he will personally attempt to beg pardons for them all. For his service, the king has More knighted and made Lord Chancellor of England. He later receives the Lord Mayor and a party of aldermen (and their wives), and commissions a performance by the Lord Cardinal's players of the interlude The Marriage of Wit and Wisdom. When the actor who is to play the role of Good Counsel (Luggins) fails to appear, More takes the part himself extemporaneously. During the Privy Council scene, when the king sends a demand that the members subscribe to the Oath of Supremacy, More and Doctor John Fisher, the Bishop of Rochester, are unable in good conscience to do so. The bishop is taken to prison at once, but More is allowed to remain at home where the Earls of Shrewsbury and Surrey present him with a final chance to submit. When he again refuses, he is arrested by Downes and taken to the Tower. In his confinement, More impresses the Lieutenant of the Tower with his good humor, courage, and principled stand. During a final visit by his family, More assures them he is not able to submit, entrusts what is left of his estate to his wife Lady More, asks his son-in-law Master Roper to look out for Lady Roper (More's daughter Margaret), and urges them to "live all, and love together." Joking constantly as he is taken to the scaffold, he bids a warm farewell to the Earls of Surrey and Shrewsbury, and he follows the protocols expected on such occasions by forgiving the executioner (here listed as the Hangman) and giving him his gown. At Shrewsbury's urging he publicly accepts his fate for having disappointed the monarch, but jokes that he will send the king for "my trespass a reverent head, somewhat bald."
II.
In the anonymous Thomas Lord Cromwell, he responds to the small talk explanation of the eating habits of the Spanish at Hales's banquet, and comments that it's good to drink healths unless you drink too many and they make you ill. When nobles discuss the fall of Wolsey, Hales, More and Gardiner discuss how the wheel of state brought the proud Wolsey down. When Cromwell is knighted, appointed to the privy council and made Master of the Rolls and modestly expresses his unworthiness of the honours, More observes that it is wise of Cromwell to seem to refuse them.
III.
A "ghost character" in Shakespeare's Henry VIII. Cromwell reports that Sir Thomas More has been chosen Lord Chancellor to replace Wolsey.

THOMAS MOWBRAY

Duke of Norfolk in Shakespeare's Richard II. He is accused by Bolingbroke of treason (appropriating the King's money, hatching plots and murdering Thomas Woodstock, Duke of Gloucester). When he is banished by King Richard for life he asserts that Bolingbroke's disloyalty will eventually be revealed with serious consequences for Richard.

THOMAS MOWBRAY, LORD

Marshal of the Archbishop of York's troops, Mowbray is concerned about amassing enough troops to do well against the king in Shakespeare's 2 Henry IV. Mowbray employed the youthful Falstaff once as a page and is firmly against the peace parley and disbanding decision agreed upon by the factions.

THOMAS of WOODSTOCK

Duke of Gloucester in the anonymous Thomas of Woodstock. Hero of the play. "Plain Thomas", as he is proud to be known, is uncle to the young King Richard II and begins the play as Protector of the realm. Woodstock seems originally more sanguine than his brothers, Lancaster and York, about the King: he is confident, unlike them, that Richard was not behind the plan of the Carmelite friar to poison them, and is hopeful that the imminent marriage between Richard and Anne o'Beame will have a calming effect. He makes the gesture, costly for him, of dressing "bravely" - in expensive clothes, not his usual frieze - for the coronation; but his good humour is fragile, and when Richard teases him about his "golden metamorphosis", he soon starts on an angry, public speech about the King's extravagance. This backfires: Richard at once loads his favorites Greene and Bagot, and the lawyer Tresilian, with further honours, and soon afterwards his favorite Bushy makes the discovery that Richard is of age to rule alone. He demands Woodstock's "council staff", and Woodstock relinquishes it, announcing that he will now withdraw from Court to his country house at Plashy. There he receives news from his friend Cheney of the King's disastrous policies, including the "blank charters" of unlimited taxation; he declines Richard's "entreaty" that he should return to Court. Angered by this, and afraid of "Plain Thomas"'s popularity in the country, Richard resolves to get rid of him. Tresilian has the idea of arresting him secretly, under cover of a masque at Plashy, and conveying him to Calais, English territory abroad, where he can be privately murdered. They carry out this plan: Woodstock recognizes the King among the disguised masquers, and appeals vainly to his better nature–thus starting off, perhaps, the prolonged but useless guilt that Richard will shortly manifest. Under house arrest in Calas, Woodstock is visited by the two Ghosts, one of his brother, the Black Prince, the other of his father, Edward III: both warn him of his coming danger, but in vain. Engaged by the corrupt governor Lapoole, the two Murderers attack him from the back, and kill him by strangling and suffocation. To the last, Woodstock is confident of his integrity, and wishes to write to Richard "Not to entreat, but to admonish him". His death leaves his wife, the Duchess of Gloucester, distraught, and inspires his brothers Lancaster and York to take up arms against the King and his favorites. The play ends with their victory.

THOMAS OTTER

Thomas Otter is a land and sea captain in Jonson's Epicoene. According to Truewit, he is foolish and is totally submitted to his wife. In a room at his house, Otter enters with his wife, who shows displeasure at Otter's inclination towards partying and his nostalgic reminiscence of his bygone bachelor days, when he used to frequent the bear-baiting arena. When the gallants Truewit, Clerimont, and Dauphine enter, Mistress Otter drives her husband off to fetch refreshments for the guests and he exits obediently. Otter re-enters and the gallants persuade him to join the party that is being relocated at Morose's house and to bring his favorite drinking cups and the trumpets and drums. At Morose's house, Otter shows up with his trumpets and drums, adding to the already existing pandemonium. All gallants drink heavily. While Mistress Otter is eavesdropping, the drunken Otter starts revealing hard truths about his wife. He says that he married her for her money, she is a wicked vixen and her beauty is counterfeit, because she takes herself asunder into some twenty boxes every night when she goes to bed. Horrified at her husband's radical remarks, Mistress Otter starts beating Otter, but she is chased away by the revolted Morose. Recovered from his temporary insanity, Otter asks the gallants to help pacify his wife, whom he calls princess again. Otter informs the others that he will keep out of the way for a fortnight in one of the taverns until the scandal wears off. Otter exits, telling everyone to come and visit him at his place of retirement. Otter re-enters disguised as a Divine and counsels Morose on divorce. Dauphine unmasks Otter's disguise in the final revelation scene.

THOMAS PALMER, SIR**1595

Sir Thomas Palmer in Chettle, Dekker and Munday's Sir Thomas More visits the Privy Council with the articles of submission King Henry VIII wants the nobles to sign. When Doctor John Fisher, the Bishop of Rochester, and Thomas More refuse, Palmer orders the clergyman taken to prison and More to be kept under house arrest in Chelsea.

THOMAS RAMSEY, SIR

A knight in Heywood's 2 If You Know Not Me. Gresham is enmeshed in a legal dispute with Ramsey over a property each claims as his own. Later, as Lord Mayor, Ramsey is a supporter of the Exchange. He dies shortly thereafter.

THOMAS RANDOLPH

The first of the two fathers in Randolph's Thomas Randolph's Salting.

THOMAS RANDOLPH **1641

Only mentioned in Wild’s The Benefice. Invention reads some praise for him (‘a sweeter swan did never sing’) but Furor Poeticus finds fault in his works (‘his wit’s too violent long to endure’) and calls for an imaginary Jailor to take him away.

THOMAS SALEWARE

Thomas Saleware is a citizen and a cuckold in Brome's A Mad Couple. In fact, he has always thought that one of his kids was not his. His wife, Alicia, works in his shop. In Act One, he comes to see how much she has sold. There, he discovers that she has not made much money. They decide to be friends from now on. Later, in Act Four, he shares his doubts with Bellamy because he thinks that his wife has been sleeping with someone, and then he is planning his revenge. In Act Five, he goes to Lord Lovely's with Alicia to complain about Bellamy, who has slept with his wife and who has been seen to go to Lord Thrivewell. Then, he is informed that everything was his wife's plan to make him jealous.

THOMAS SCARBORROW

Thomas Scarborrow is the youngest brother of William and a scholar at Oxford in Wilkins's The Miseries of Enforced Marriage. He along with his brother John and sister desires to have his share of his father's estate.

THOMAS SCROOP

A favorite of Richard II in the anonymous Thomas of Woodstock, along with Bagot, Bushy, and Greene Scroop, like the others, fosters the King's hatred of his uncle, Woodstock, and encourages him to hand over power to the favorites instead; when Richard divides up the country between them, Scroop receives the northern area, between the rivers Trent and Tweed. With Greene, he prevents the King from saving Woodstock's life at the last minute. He fights in the final battle and is last seen as a prisoner of the King's opponents.

THOMAS SELLINGER, SIR

I.
A courtier and good companion to King Edward in Thomas Heywood's 1 Edward IV, Sellinger urges the king not to be worried or swayed by the remarks of the Duchess of York concerning the king's recent marriage to John Gray's widow. Calling himself Tom Twist he accompanies the disguised king to dinner at the home of Hobs the Tanner.
II.
Traveling with Edward during the French campaign in Thomas Heywood's 2 Edward IV, Sellinger is assigned to spy upon the French Duke of Burgundy.

THOMAS, SHELEEMIEN

Sheleemien Thomas is the Irish name given to Nurse in disguise in Jonson's The New Inn, when she is attending Frank. Like Frank/Laetitia, Nurse/Sheleemien Thomas is always present in Lady Frampul's party, but she seems to be drunk or sleeping most of the time. During the first session of the love court, it seems that Nurse had been busy with a bottle, because Host tells her to put away the bottle and go to sleep. In her drunken babble, Nurse speaks of a long line of Irish names, thus proving her fictional Irish ancestry. During the second session of the love court, Nurse/ Sheleemien Thomas is sleeping, and Beaufort tells the others not to wake her, because he wanted to be free to court Frank/Laetitia. When the second court of love ends, Host wakes Nurse/Sheleemien Thomas, asking her about Frank/Laetitia. Nurse exits to look for her ward. Nurse re-enters just after Beaufort announces his marriage to Frank/Laetitia, and Host mocks him for having married a boy. Nurse clears the situation revealing that Frank, whom Host believed to be a boy, was actually her daughter. Then, Nurse reveals herself as Lady Frampul, wife to Lord Frampul and mother to Laetitia and Frances.

THOMAS SHELTON **1627

Only mentioned in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. When told that Plutus will find his way to honest houses "at a short-hand," Blepsidemus replies, "What, brachygraphy? Thomas Shelton's art?" Shelton translated Don Quixote in the 1620's not from Cervantes' original text but from the Brussels' editions.

THOMAS SHERLEY JUNIOR

Sir Thomas Sherley Jr is one of the eponymous English brothers in Day, Rowley and Wilkins's The Travels of the Three English Brothers. He travels to meet Anthony in Venice, but on the way, decides to attack a Turkish island. His crew mutiny and leave him on the island, where he is captured and taken to the Great Turk. Thomas refuses to reveal his identity, and survives months of torture with Christian fortitude. He is released when the King of England demands his return, and is reunited with his father there.

THOMAS SHERLEY SENIOR

Sir Thomas is the father of the Sherley brothers in Day, Rowley and Wilkins's The Travels of the Three English Brothers. He appears only in the dumbshows that begin and end the play: in the first, he is seen parting from his sons, and in the second, he stands with Thomas Jr. in England.

THOMAS, SIR

Sir Thomas is a Welsh gentleman in the anonymous True Tragedy of Richard III who travels to Bosworth Field to fight with Richmond against Richard III.

THOMAS SMALLSHANKS

Thomas Smallshanks is the slow-witted brother of William Smallshanks and the older son of Sir Oliver Smallshanks in Barry's Ram Alley. He professes that he is glad to see Sir Oliver and William reconciled due to William's forthcoming marriage to Constantia Sommerfield. Thomas accompanies William en route to the Savoy, where "Constantia"—really Francis impersonating Constantia—is kidnapped by Throat. Thomas tries to marry "Constantia" himself, and kidnaps her from the custody of Lieutenant Beard; he plans a double wedding with Sir Oliver and Changeable Taffeta. Thomas and Francis are arrested by the Constable and brought to Justice Tutchin at Taffeta's house. At the end, Thomas is left with nobody to marry and has to admit that he is a fool.

THOMAS SPENCER

Sir Thomas Spencer in Peele's Edward I brings Edward the report of Queen Elinor's sinking into the earth at Charing Cross and her reappearance at Potter's Hive (afterward called Queenhith).

THOMAS STERNHOLD **1627

Only mentioned in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. Stiff praises him and John Hopkins for joining the Psalms to the Book of Common Prayer in "David's time." So beautiful is the meter that Stiff can sleep by it "as well as any in the parish."

THOMAS STUKELEY, CAPTAIN
The title character of the anonymous Captain Thomas Stukeley is an adventurer, involved in various commercial, political, and especially military exploits. At the beginning of the play, he outwits his perennial rival Vernon and marries the daughter of the immensely wealthy Sir Thomas Curtis, a Spanish gentleman. After the marriage he walks on stage with bags of money, part of which he disperses to various creditors and tradesmen for various goods and services rendered in the past. Unbeknownst to his new wife and her family, and against the wishes of his own father, Old Stukeley, who wishes him to pursue a legal career, he uses his newfound wealth to finance his global adventures. Stukeley sets off for Ireland where he subdues the Irish forces at Dundalk and is credited as "lusty Stukeley," the conquering hero despite the substantial assistance of Vernon and others. His overbearing demeanor soon leads him to quarrel with Harbart, Captain of the English Garrison who expels him from the country. Stukeley then travels to the court of King Phillip of Spain where he quickly becomes involved in that monarch's plans to accede the throne of Portugal through a duplicitous alliance with its king, Don Sebastian. Phillip sends Stukeley as his emissary to the pope to request his advice in the proceedings. After being taken prisoner by Hernando, he is quickly released; for his services, the pope appoints him Marquis of Ireland. He joins the combined European force at the Battle of Alcazar and although he fights valiantly, is eventually subdued when the conflict turns against the European powers. He meets his final end fighting alongside his old nemesis, Vernon.

THOMAS STUKELEY, OLD
Father of the adventurer, Captain Thomas Stukeley, in the anonymous Captain Thomas Stukeley. He disapproves of his son's youthful antics, both in London and abroad. After gaining entrance to his son's study and learning of his nuptial plans, he accuses his son of being a "changeling" for engaging in such a self-serving marriage and for not following in his footsteps in pursuit of a legal career.

THOMAS THORNAY

Thornay is a friend of Gerard in Shirley's Changes. He agrees to select one of Goldsworth's daughters as wife, leaving the other for Gerard, who cannot choose between the two women. Originally offering love to Chrysolina, Thornay quickly switches his allegiance to Eugenia, who has long loved him and whom he weds at the end of the play.

THOMAS THUMPE
Also know as Blunt in the anonymous Captain Thomas Stukeley, a buckler-maker of the Strand (St. Giles). Along with many other tradesmen, he gossips about the impending marriage of Captain Stukeley and Nell, daughter of the wealthy Sir Thomas Curtis. Immediately after the wedding, they seek to abscond with Stukeley's newfound money, citing debs both real and fabricated.

THOMAS TRINCALO **1615

Pandolfo’s farmer in Tomkis’ Albumazar. He has rented a farm in Tottenham for ten pounds these last thirteen years. He loves Armellina and woos her with words learnt at the Fortune and Red Bull playhouses and presents a parody of several famous lines including “O lips, no lips, but leaves besmeared with mildew." He agrees to allow Albumazar to transform him into Antonio with the purpose of bestowing Fulvia upon Pandolfo. In exchange, Pandolfo is to urge the false Antonio to bestow “his" maid Armellina on Trincalo and give them two hundred crowns and free rent on the Tottenham farm. Unable to keep the secret, he tells the plan to Cricca. After the ceremony, Albumazar tells Trincalo that he looks like Antonio for a day but must avoid all looking glasses or the spell will disolve. He is duped when Ronca pretends to recognize him as Antonio and gives him ten pounds to “repay" a bail that he says Antonio stood for him before going to Barbary. Trincalo puffs himself up and wants great men to call him Tony. Harpax comes to claim ten pounds from “Antonio" that he lent him, but Trincalo gives him only five. Ronca then returns in disguise and cuts his purse for the remaining five. Trincalo/Antonio is taken to Bevilona’s house to carouse, but when her “husband" comes home (Ronca in disguise), he must hide in an empty hogshead. Ronca calls to fill the barrel, nearly drowning Trincalo. Ronca pretends a jealous rage until he discovers it is “Antonio" and feasts him instead. He goes to Antonio’s house to do his work and there meets the real Antonio. Not knowing him, he tells Antonio that he is Antonio. Not knowing the tables have been turned, he believes the trick is working when first Lelio and then Armellina call him Antonio. She tricks him inside and locks him in the cellar. Upon Trincalo’s escape from Antonio’s cellar, he comes upon Pandolfo, who beats him until Trincalo tells him what has really happened and that Pandolfo’s plate and gold have been stolen indeed. He learns from Cricca that he’s been given Armellina in marriage with two hundred crowns as his portion and twenty pounds per year for three lifetimes. He delivers the epilogue, glorying in his good fortune and inviting everyone to come to his place in Tottenham four nights hence.

THOMAS TRUNNEL

A workman in the shipyard in Mountfort's The Launching of The Mary. The workmen quarrel genially as they work, and mutter about the massacre of Englishmen by the Dutch at Amboyna (although the reference to Amboyna was deleted by the censor). Later, they meet in a tavern, and Sheathing-Nail tells the story of the massacre (this too was censored). Trunnel encourages the workmen to taunt Dorothea Constance, whom they assume to be as unconstant as the other women in town, but they are chased off by Captain Fitzjohn. When the Mary is launched, the workmen entertain the East India Company board members with "some dainty dance, every one wearing the emblem of his name upon his head."

THOMAS up WILLIAM up MORGAN up DAVY up ROGER &c. **1615

A disguise character in Tomkis’ Albumazar. Bevilona’s husband. Bevilona tells Trinculo/Antonio that her husband is away and so “Antonio" may be master in his place. Moments later, Ronca knocks at Bevilona’s door while she entertains Trincalo/Antonio and gives this as his name.

THOMAS URSWICK

Urswick serves in Thomas Heywood's 1 Edward IV as the Master Recorder for the Lord Mayor of London. He mans the bridge during Falconbridge's siege of London, and the king knights him for meritorious service.

THOMAS VAUGHAN, SIR

I.
Sir Thomas Vaughan attends the young King Edward V at his stronghold in Northampton at the beginning of the anonymous True Tragedy of Richard III. Vaughan is arrested by Gloucester, charged with high treason and condemned to death.
II.
Friend of Edward IV's queen Elizabeth's family, and enemy of the Yorks and Lord Hastings in Shakespeare's Richard III. Vaughan is arrested with Rivers and Gray, and executed in Pomfret castle, where Richard II had been murdered. His ghost visits Richard and Richmond the night before the Battle of Bosworth, cursing Richard and blessing Richmond.

THOMAS WART

Recruited by Shallow for military service with Falstaff, Thomas Wart is originally refused by Sir John in Shakespeare's 2 Henry IV. After Mouldy and Bullcalf buy themselves out of the company, however, Wart is accepted into service. Francis Feeble is anxious that Wart should be made part of the company.

THOMAS WINCHESTER

Beech's boy in Yarington's Two Lamentable Tragedies. Attends Beech's shop and is left in charge when Merry fetches Beech back to his tavern. Later, sitting outside Beech's shop, Winchester is ordered to go inside by Merry, who then strikes him in the head with his hammer seven times, leaving the hammer embedded in Winchester's head. Winchester's cries are heard by a Maid, who calls for help. Winchester survives unconscious for several more days before dying; his body is brought on stage and laid beside the remains of Beech as the Neighbours and Loney search for the person who bought the bag used by Merry to dispose of Beech's head and legs.

THOMAS WYATT, SIR

Almost alone among the members of the royal council in Dekker and Webster's Sir Thomas Wyatt, Sir Thomas Wyatt objects to the disinheriting of the princesses Mary and Elizabeth, and he refuses to give his approval to the will of Edward VI which calls for Lady Jane Grey to take the English throne. Later, he reminds the council members that years before they had sworn to support the children of Henry VIII and thus manages to shift the council's support to Mary. After Mary's installation, he urges the new queen to show mercy to Lady Jane, pointing to her youth and her close blood ties to Mary herself, but the queen is in favor of the more severe actions endorsed by the Bishop of Winchester. Moments later, Wyatt becomes enraged by Winchester's sycophantic remarks that England should be flattered that the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V should so condescend to suggest a marriage between Mary and his son Phillip II of Spain, and he reminds everyone that they were sworn to uphold both the laws and the last will of Henry VIII which barred Spaniards from English soil. After Mary signals her intention to marry Phillip and sends Count Egmont, the Spanish ambassador, to inform Phillip of her decision, Wyatt determines to raise a force in Kent and save the realm from this Spanish marriage. With his forces at Rochester, Wyatt confronts the army led by the Duke of Norfolk. Although deserted by Sir George Harper before the battle, Wyatt receives new support when the five hundred Londoners led by Alexander Brett leave the queen's forces in order to follow Wyatt to London. At Ludgate, the Earl of Pembroke, who has been named Lieutenant of the City, refuses Wyatt entry, and Sir Thomas finds himself deserted by Brett's London company when they learn that their fellow citizens are firmly supportive of their new queen. The wounded Wyatt surrenders to the queen's officers and is taken to the Tower. He finally is summoned before the Bishop of Winchester, and after the two exchange insults, Wyatt is sentenced to be hanged, drawn, and quartered.

THOMASIN

Thomasin, Bellamira's maid in the anonymous Trial Of Chivalry, is admired by both Peter de Lions and Dick Bowyer, although her own preference is for Bowyer. Peter de Lions steals the key from her which enables his master Burbon to enter Bellamira's tent. Thomasin is one of those who discover Bellamira after Burbon has poisoned her. She is next seen on the battlefield, where she is abducted by Peter de Lions and rescued by Bowyer.

THOMASINE QUOMODO

Wife of the wealthy draper, Ephestian Quomodo, and mother to Sim and Susan in Middleton's Michaelmas Term. Thomasine disapproves of her daughter's impending marriage to Andrew Lethe, preferring the gallant Rearage instead. Thomasine is able to see through her husband's machinations and his desire for wealth and increased social standing. She sardonically comments on her husband's extortionate proceedings from a balcony above the stage. Taking pity on the gull Easy, she marries him when Quomodo fakes his own death, thereby enabling the transfer of Quomodo's wealth to her new husband. Thomasine also sees her daughter married to Rearage when it is revealed that Lethe has kept a mistress (the Country Wench) throughout his courtship of Susan.

THOMASINE TWEEDLES

A fictional character invented by Gerardine in Middleton's The Family of Love. Tweedles is supposedly a mistress of Glister's who has born him a bastard son.

THOMAZO

Thomazo is the supposed son of Duke Contarini of Venice in Shirley's The Gentleman of Venice. Thomazo is mean-spirited and without honor–so much so that the duke secretly commissions the courtier Marino to keep an eye on Thomazo and make reports. Thomazo steals the royal jewels, intending to sell them and use the proceeds to buy alcohol. Marino is entrusted with this task, and reports it to the Duke. Marino's report results in Thomazo's arrest for high treason. Thomazo is saved because Ursula, in pleading for Thomazo, admits that he is in fact her own son, exchanged with the duke's son during the boys; infancy. Thomazo, therefore, becomes Giovanni and is placed in the home of his true father, Roberto the gardener.

THONG, MASTER

A "ghost character" in Cooke's Greene's Tu Quoque. This belt-maker is summoned to serve the newly wealthy Bartholemew Bubbles.

THORELLO

An old traveler in Davenant's The Fair Favorite. Recently arrived at court, he is a curious observer of the unusual situations that prevail.

THORNAY, THOMAS

Thornay is a friend of Gerard in Shirley's Changes. He agrees to select one of Goldsworth's daughters as wife, leaving the other for Gerard, who cannot choose between the two women. Originally offering love to Chrysolina, Thornay quickly switches his allegiance to Eugenia, who has long loved him and whom he weds at the end of the play.

THORNE

An English commissioner of Scotland along with Haslerig and Selby in J.W.'s The Valiant Scot. The commissioners humiliate Old Wallace, forcing him to give up his lands, and they refuse to help Sir John Graham when Young Selby abducts his daughter Peggie. Wallace saves Peggie by killing Young Selby. The commissioners capture Peggie and order her to be executed unless Wallace gives himself up. Wallace does so, and Peggie is duly exchanged for him, but Wallace is then released by Grimsby, who defects to the Scots.

THORNE, MADAME

Madame Thorne is the disguise assumed by Morello in his attempt to gain access to the castle/prison in which Eugenia and her attendants are held in Shirley's The Bird in a Cage.

THOROWGOOD **1629

A "ghost character" in ?Clavell's The Soddered Citizen. Mr Thorowgood is a creditor. He sends a servant to see Sly, in the hope he should pay him the money his master owes him. At first, it seems that he is not going to be paid, although, in the end, all creditors will recover their money.

THOROWGOOD **1635

Thorowgood is passionately in love with Lady Marlove in ?Glapthorne's The Lady Mother. He is stalled in his marriage suit to her as she continually postpones her answer. As the play begins, he awaits her latest commission, after which, she has promised, she will respond to his request for her hand. In offstage conference with Lady Marlove, Thorowgood is informed that Belisia is a whore, and is sent to tell Bonville, Belisia's suitor. Bonville leaps to defend her honor, drawing on Thorowgood, until Thorowgood reveals that the information comes from Lady Marlove herself. After Belisia and Bonville break off their engagement, Thorowgood goes to Belisia to reveal that he was the source of the accusation, which he got from her mother, but she accuses him of supporting Bonville's untruth for pay. After Clariana has inexplicably broken off her engagement with Thurston, Thorowgood accompanies Thurston in a later encounter with Clariana, wherein the heartbroken young woman, at her mother's request, pleads her mother's love suit to Thurston, her baffled former suitor. Thorowgood, still in love with Lady Marlove, informs her that her daughter Belisia and her suitor Bonville have drowned crossing a river as they attempted to escape her tyranny and flee to Bonville's mother. This is a plot concocted by Thorowgood and others to teach Lady Marlove a lesson, which is revealed in the closing Act of the play. In the meantime, he attempts to save her from execution at the hands of the law, when she confesses that she has caused the death of her beloved Thurston, who is reported to have been killed at her behest by her son, Young Marlove. At the end of the play, with all false reports of death having been cleared up, and with Thurston secretly wed to Clariana, Thorowgood at last wins Lady Marlove's hand in marriage.

THOROWGOOD **1638

A young gentleman and suitor to Clare and cousin to Jeremy Hold–fast in Glapthorne’s Wit in a Constable. He is held in rich esteem amongst the city’s wits. He reclaims his foolish cousin Jeremy from a scholar’s life and gives him a new suit of clothes. He and Clare have conspired that he should pose as a scholar himself to win Alderman Covet’s acceptance of him. He presents himself to Covet in scholar’s robes and calls himself Jeremy Hold–fast. He quickly wins Covet’s permission to marry Clare, but when Clare and Grace pretend not to know him he declares he will pay them for their witty abuse. He undeceives Covet regarding his and Jeremy’s identities. Since Covet has already bestowed Grace upon Sir Timothy, Thorowgood declares that he wishes to have Clare bestowed upon Jeremy. He pretends to be scandalized when Valentine is discovered disguised as Sir Timothy’s niece, pretending that he imagines that Valentine was invited by the ladies for immorality. Using this for his pretext, he has both Jeremy and Sir Timothy foreswear the women, who have ‘proved’ themselves fit only to be wives of twice-broken merchants. In act four Thorowgood’s name is suddenly changed (by authorial mistake?) to Freewit. See FREEWIT for his actions in the second half of the play. To add to the textual confusion, once they are married, the text switches between calling this character Thorowgood and Freewit and even includes both names in two stage directions as if they are two characters (which is impossible unless both have married Clare).

THRACE, KING of **1604

Along with Bohemia and Thrace in Verney’s Antipoe, he agrees to meet Dramurgon’s army and fight on Thursday next. A squire appears on the field of combat after Dramurgon swoons and asks the kings of Bohemia, Corinth and Thrace if they will agree to face a champion from Dramurgon under the same terms, and they agree. Thrace is killed by the champion, Antipoe.

THRACIAN LORD, FIRST, SECOND, and THIRD

There are three Lords of Thrace in [?]W. Rowley's The Thracian Wonder:
  1. The First Lord is an important Thracian. He is named Pallatio although most editions do not use the name in his speech prefixes. He begs Pheander to spare Ariadne's life and advises him against executing Sophos. He travels to the Delphic oracle and brings the message to Pheander. The Thracian Lords are given charge of the country by the King of Sicilia when Pheander resigns the throne. After the second battle, this First Thracian Lord organizes the parley between Sicily and Thrace.
  2. The Second Lord supports the First Thracian Lord (Pallatio) in everything he does.
  3. The Third Lord advises Pheander against executing Sopos.

THRASEA PAETUS

A "ghost character," Thrasea is a stoic killed by Domitian in Massinger's The Roman Actor. He is only mentioned by other characters. Palphurius Sura and Junius Rusticus are put to death for their objections to this execution. Their own stoic stance under torture is inspired by his example.

THRASELLUS

King of Norway in the Anonymous Clyomon and Clamydes. He complains to his Lords that he is hopelessly in love with Neronis. Her father, King Patranius, has rejected his request to marry her, and he now proposes to take her by force. His Lords counsel him to disguise himself as a merchant and steal her instead. He accepts this advice, and it succeeds. Once back in Norway, Neronis tricks him into believing that she loves him. Lulled into a false security, Thrasellus allows her enough freedom to effect her escape from him disguised as a page. Pursuing her into the woods, Thrasellus meets Clyomon. They fight, and though he wounds the Knight of the Golden Shield, he is killed. Corin and Clyomon bury him. Clyomon leaves his golden shield and sword at the grave—the point hanging down to signify that Thrasellus was conquered and lost renown. Clyomon also writes a placard describing who lies in the grave. It is this grave that Neronis later discovers and mistakes for Clyomon's.

THRASIBULUS

Thrasibulus is a wealthy but profligate young gentleman in Greene and Lodge's A Looking Glass For London And England who puts his lands in pawn to the Usurer. When he is minutes late in offering repayment, the Usurer takes the property and refuses to accept the money. Thrasibulus engages the corrupt Lawyer to represent him and Alcon in an attempt to get their property back, but like the Judge, the Lawyer accepts a bribe to throw the case, and no justice is done. After engaging in burglary and theft to support himself, Thrasibulus has his lands restored after the Usurer reforms, and prompted by this, he pledges that he will make restitution to all from whom he has stolen.

THRASILINE

Thrasiline is a noble court Gentleman in Beaumont and Fletcher's Philaster, or Love Lies A-Bleeding. He is firmly in opposition to the succession of the foreign prince Pharamond to the Calabrian crown, and he remains loyal to Philaster. His small role serves to round out a steadfast threesome of courtiers: himself, Cleremont, and Dion.

THRASIMACUS

Son of Corineus, Brutus' nephew, general of Albanact's army in the Anonymous Locrine. After Corineus's death Locrine says that he intends to leave Gwendoline and live with Elstrid. When Thrasimacus then reminds him of Brutus' and his father's exhortations and reproaches his behaviour, Locrine banishes him from his court. Thrasimacus swears revenge. He returns with Gwendoline and an army, and together they defeat Locrine.

THRASYMACHUS **1632

A soldier in Randolph's Jealous Lovers. A member of Asotus' roaring coterie. At Ballio's house he promises to defend the courtesan Phryne's reputation against all detractors. He momentarily switches allegiance when Simo intercedes to seduce Phryne but returns to Asotus when Simo retreats. Later, he helps spread the false rumor of Tyndarus and Techmessa's suicide.

THRAUS

Thraus, whose name means "fierceness," is the father of Ithocles and Penthea in Ford's The Broken Heart. He is already dead when the play opens. He had fought with Crotolon and in recompense had promised his daughter Penthea to Crotolon's son, Orgilus. When Thraus died Ithocles gave Penthea to his friend Bassanes instead. This is the motivation for revenge in the play.

THRIFT **1619

A citizen in the Praeludium in (?)Goffe’s Careless Shepherdess. He offers Bolt a groat to be allowed into the play. He later laments that all the plays are written by Inns of Court Men and Courtiers and the poets have been left to starve. When two different actors fail to remember the prologue, Thrift decides to get his money back and go to the Fortune or Bull playhouse where he can see a play for two pence and get a jig besides.

THRIFT, HENRY

A "ghost character" in Quarles' The Virgin Widow. Pertenax has a bond from him.

THRIFT, SIR TYRANT

Lady Ample's guardian in Davenant's The Wits. He plans to marry her off against her will before his guardianship expires. Instead, he is pleased to find that she is apparently dying, leaving him her entire fortune. He demonstrates his heartlessness by his plans to bury her cheaply. This is, of course, another of Lady Ample's tricks, and his greedy schemes are foiled.

THRIVEWELL, LADY

Lady Thrivewell is Sir Thrivewell's wife in Brome's A Mad Couple. She married to give her husband a son. But, she finds out that he has been unfaithful to her. In Act Two, she is buying a dress in Alicia's shop with her Servingman. She is not to pay it because Alicia has lain with her husband. She also invites Carelesse to come with her abroad in the coach to buy some toys, which is misunderstood as an invitation to sleep with her. Later, in Act Four, when she is left alone by her husband, she plans to make Carelesse sleep with a lady.

THRIVEWELL, SIR

Sir Thrivewell is Carelesse's uncle in Brome's A Mad Couple. Sir Thrivewell adopted him as his heir and he has given his nephew 200 pounds per annum. He has also helped him with his debts. However, now he has gotten tired of it and he has decided to get married to have an heir. Nevertheless, before that, he confesses to his wife that he has been sleeping around with Alicia. In Act Two, he makes up his mind about his nephew to whom he is to give 10,000 pounds and a wife. In Act Four, he tells his wife that he is to depart on a trip, which is to be his perdition as Bellamy tells him in Act Five.

THROAT

Throat is an unqualified lawyer in Barry's Ram Alley, who describes himself as "merely dregs and offscum of the law." He has taken the land of William Smallshanks under a forfeited mortgage. Thomas Boutcher tells him that William has eloped with Constantia Sommerfield, and Throat invites them to his house. Throat plans, however, to swindle William and to steal "Constantia" for himself, not knowing that "Constantia" is really the courtesan Francis. He therefore tells "Constantia" that William is a threadbare prodigal with an idiot father and proposes himself in William's place. Throat marries "Constantia." He returns William's mortgage and pays his debt to Lieutenant Beard on the proviso that William give up all claim to "Constantia." Throat pawns his books to hire fine clothes in which to meet Lady Sommerfield; when he goes to visit her, however, she thinks that Throat is mad, and Justice Tutchin arrests him for felony. Beard tells Throat that he has lost "Constantia" and is also arrested. Justice Tutchin and Lady Sommerfield bring Throat and Beard to the house of Changeable Taffeta, where Throat accuses William. The Constable brings in Thomas Smallshanks and Francis (still disguised as Constantia), and Lady Sommerfield denies that Francis is her daughter. Throat attempts to have his marriage to Francis dissolved, but is eventually reconciled with her.

THRUM

A "ghost character" in Middleton's The Family of Love. A a feltmaker mentioned by Gerardine as a criminal who must appear in court.

THUCYDIDES

I.
Only mentioned in Jonson's Epicoene. Thucydides (460?–404? BC) was an Athenian historian. His stature as an historian has never been surpassed and rarely equaled. In his History of the Peloponnesian War, he accomplished what few others have: he wrote an eyewitness account of the events of the war as they unfolded. At his house, the self-conceited Daw boasts his learning and poetic talent, while Clerimont and Dauphine deride his pompousness covertly. Daw shows his contempt for many great minds of classical antiquity and calls Thucydides and Livy tedious and dry authors. Daw adds that he utters wise aphorisms every hour and, if only they were collected, he would become equally famous.
II.
Only mentioned in Ruggle’s Club Law. In the epilogue, Cricket alludes to the writer as one who mentioned Club Law with approval.

THUMB

A miller in Shirley's The Arcadia. He argues with the Rebels in the king and queen's favor; conspires with the Rebels, challenging Philanax's authority. Killed in the battle between the Rebels and Basilius' company.

THUMB, CAPTAIN

A pseudonym in Jonson's A Tale of A Tub, first invented by Basket Hilts on Squire Tripoly Tub's behalf. The victim of an invented robbery, Hilts accuses John Clay in Thumb's name and thereby prevents his marriage to Audrey. The alias of Captain Thumb is then assumed by Canon Hugh for the same purpose on Justice Preamble's behalf.

THUMB, TOM

I.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Tom Thumb is mentioned by Master Fright when, on his second visit to Doctor Clyster to have his fears cured, he is asked if the hangings ever trouble him. He replies that his "hanging story of little David had almost killed" him. Later, he points out that "they had made little David no bigger than Tom Thumb." Tom Thumb is the protagonist of an anonymous prose tale published in 1621, which became extremely popular. He was a very little boy, not even as tall as his mother's thumb. In the last four hundred years, many different versions of that original tale have been written.
II.
Only mentioned in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. Penia-Penniless compares her followers to diminutive Tom Thumb.
III.
Only mentioned in Glapthorne’s Wit in a Constable. Thorowgood teases Jeremy Hold–fast that all his learning is fit only to wear a strip of lining proper only for Tom Thumb.

THUMB, TOM **1636

A nickname for Captain Pick in Glapthorne’s Hollander.

THUMP

Thump is a seldom-seen servant to Sir Simple in Shirley's Changes.

THUMP, OLD **1641

A “ghost character" in (?)Shipman’s Grobiana’s Nuptials. A lawyer and Grobian. He is on the list of invitees Oyestus is sent to cry into the Grobian feast.

THUMP, PETER

Peter Thump, Thomas Horner's apprentice in Shakespeare's 2 Henry VI, is among the petitioners who approach Margaret and Suffolk in I.iii. Peter accuses his master of saying that the Duke of York is the rightful heir to the throne. When the case is brought before King Henry, Horner offers to provide a witness against Peter, and the two men are sentenced to single combat at Gloucester's recommendation. Horner is vanquished and confesses his treason before he dies.

THUMPE, THOMAS
Also know as Blunt in the anonymous Captain Thomas Stukeley, a buckler-maker of the Strand (St. Giles). Along with many other tradesmen, he gossips about the impending marriage of Captain Stukeley and Nell, daughter of the wealthy Sir Thomas Curtis. Immediately after the wedding, they seek to abscond with Stukeley's newfound money, citing debs both real and fabricated.

THURIGER

"The Sexton of Apolloes Temple" in Hawkins's Apollo Shroving. Thuriger appears late in the play. He and Scopas ready Apollo's "Judgement Seate" for the sentencing of all disobedient characters at the play's end. He sends Scopas to "see how forward" the crowd is and to "bring away the Frankinsence." Ludio is sent by Preco, after his own appearance in Apollo's Court, to tell Thuriger to prepare the Temple for "Apollo and his Actors." Ludio imparts information to Thuriger about the trials presented to Apollo, and recites to the Sexton a small part of his own "Apology" which he had a friend draw up for him (in return for lessons in gaming). He informs Thuriger that his "sachell" was stolen by a Villain while he was presenting his argument, wherein lay all of his "best houshold-stuffe and tooles of [his] trade." After Scopas returns with the frankincense and tells Thuriger that "they are comming hard by," the Sexton finishes his tasks and stays to hear Museus pronounce Apollo's judgements.

THURIO

This very foolish courtier has, by virtue of his many possessions, won the admiration of the Duke in Shakespeare's The Two Gentlemen of Verona. He has not, however won the love of the Duke's daughter Silvia, and when he claims that Silvia is not worth risking his life for among the forest outlaws, Thurio's exposes his true worth to everyone.

THURSTON

Thurston loves Clariana in ?Glapthorne's The Lady Mother. He arrives with Young Marlove, his friend, and makes known to Lady Marlove his interest in Clariana, who has already accepted his suit. When he pursues her, she breaks with him, explaining that his mere presence threatens her chastity, and that she will never see him again. Having foresworn divine advice, Thurston turns to Lovell, the Steward, as a likely source of sagacity. Talking to himself, and completely unaware of Thurston's presence. Lovell works out how Grimes Gulled him, while Thurston takes his monologue as a reasonable response to his own questions. Baffled and heartbroken, Thurston questions Lady Marlove about her daughter, and Lady Marlove assures him that although she recognizes Thurston's worth and does not understand her daughter's decision, she will not force Clariana to keep her vow against her will. Thurston vows to marry the most ill-favored and ill-reputed woman he can find, as a punishment to Clariana. When Lady Marlove praises his devotion and worth, Thurston immediately shifts his suit from the unresponsive daughter to the apparently receptive mother, insisting that he sees signs of interest in her treatment of him. When Lady Marlove agrees to his suit and seals the contract with a kiss, Thurston reveals his revulsion and chastises her for her willing agreement. He is persuaded by the unhappy Clariana to devote himself to her mother, Lady Marlove, who has commissioned her daughter to win him over. Thurston agrees, out of love for Clariana, but when the hopeful Lady Marlove approaches him, Thurston reveals that he is unable to keep his promise, and aggressively condemns and rejects the mother. He encounters Young Marlove just after Lovell has delivered Lady Marlove's commission for Young Marlove to challenge Thurston to a duel. The two former friends exit together, presumably to fight. In a plot concocted in off stage by him and Young Marlove, Thurston weds Clariana secretly when the other characters are on trial for murdering him–a false story circulated by him and Young Marlove. At the end of the trial, Grimes, Timothy, Clariana, Belisia, Bonville, and Thurston enter in disguise and offer to perform a masque to instruct the condemned Lady Marlove. They perform a dance, then reveal themselves to her, explaining that Thurston and Young Marlove had concocted the plot to reveal Lady Marlove's error to her. When the marriage is revealed, Lady Marlove accepts it despite her own interest in Thurston, and agrees to wed the still-devoted Thorowgood.

THWACK SIR MORGLAY

The elder Pallatine's friend in Davenant's The Wits. He is equally determined to live by his wits–and off ladies–at the beginning of the play. He has agreed to take on the ladies over forty, while the elder Pallatine woos the younger ladies, but they quarrel about this early on. The elder Pallatine tricks him with the same empty-house scheme that was earlier used on him. Thwack is persuaded by the younger Pallatine to take his revenge. Like the elder Pallatine, he is very amused by the younger Pallatine's wit and adopts him as his heir.

THYESTES **1617

Only mentioned in Goffe’s Orestes. Aegystheus delivers an apostrophe to Thyestes, saying he is prompted to murder Agamemnon because of Thyestes’ bloody feast.

THYREUS

Thyreus (so spelled in May in his Cleopatra and by Sir Thomas North in his translations of Plutarch; modern editions read "Thyrsus") is a messenger from Caesar to Cleopatra, conveying disingenuous messages of love after Caesar's victory at Actium. Going behind the back of her lover Antonius, Cleopatra appears very responsive to these messages. Antonius's friends Aristocrates and Lucilius warn him what is happening, and engineer a situation in which he finds Thyreus with Cleopatra; but Cleopatra soon talks her way out of this, and Thyreus escapes, suffering no more than a brief threat. [Plutarch's Thyrsus, like Shakespeare's Thidias, is beaten by Antonius.]

THYRSIS **1605

A "ghost character" in Daniel's The Queen's Arcadia. Colax told Palaemon that Silvia had been unfaithful with Thyrsis. With Mirtillus and Menalcas he finds Amyntas, who has taken poison. They send for Urania, whose skill with herbs they hope can cure him.

THYRSIS **1614

The Acadian shepherd in Daniel's Hymen's Triumph. Thyrsis mourns the loss of his childhood sweetheart, Silvia, even though she was engaged to marry Alexis. Unable to think about other women, he rejects the advances of Cloris. However, he enjoys the company of her serving boy, Clorindo, perhaps because she reminds him of Silvia. Just as Clorindo is about to remove the disguise, and reveal that he is actually Silvia, he is dangerously wounded by Montanus. Restored to life by Lamia, she is formally engaged to marry Thyrsis.

THYRSIS **1634

The lover of Sylvia in Rutter's The Shepherds' Holiday, Thyrsis is the son of King Euarchus and Queen Eudora whose true name is Archigenes and who carries an encoded circle around his neck containing the key to his true identity. Although, at his birth, the king ordered that he be killed due to a daunting prophecy, Eubulus contrived with the queen to save Thyrsis's life and he was, thus, found and raised by Montanus to be a shepherd. He falls in love with the disguised Sylvia after she buys a plot of land near his, and when Cleander rescues the princess and returns her to the court the shepherd becomes grief-stricken. Thyrsis spends the majority of the play pining after the missing Sylvia and arguing with characters such as Mirtillus about the nature of love, but promises to accompany Mirtillus to Euarchus's court in order to lend his musical talents to the group of entertaining shepherds of which he has the lead part. In the court's garden he is awakened by Delia, who delivers him to his lover after preventing him from killing himself and, although Euarchus informs his counselor Eubulus that he means to treat Sylvia more easily than he was wont for her escape from the court, he directs Eubulus to kill both her and Thyrsis when Cleander reports his sighting of them in the garden. Despite the pleadings of Sylvia, Cleander means to have a servant kill the shepherd in his presence until he discovers Thyrsis's true identity, has the pair married, and informs them of their correct lineage. At the play's end the prince is reunited with his grateful father (who blesses his son's marriage to Sylvia) and the pair prepares to celebrate their nuptials.

TIAGA

One of the Spanish attackers in the anonymous Dick of Devonshire. The unarmed Pike easily defeats this first assailant during his trial by combat.

TIB

See also TYB.

TIB **1598

Tib is Cob's wife in Jonson's Every Man in His Humour. Before Cob's house, Tib enters and, at her husband's request, exits to show Mathew to Bobadill's room. At Cob's house, Tib enters to announce Bobadill that a gentleman wishes to see him. Since Bobadill is entitled to think that one of his creditors is looking for him, he instructs Tib to tell the visitor he is not in. Tib replies he has no choice, because her husband had already told the gentleman that Bobadill was there. When Mathew enters, Tib attends part of the conversation between the two, up to the point when Bobadill asks her to go and fetch him another bed-staff to give a demonstration of fencing. From Bobadill's reply, it is understood that Tib does not obey the request, probably because she refuses to dismantle all the beds in her house. Bobadill remarks that a woman does not understand the words of action. During the Captain's fencing demonstration, Tib exits quietly. In a lane before Cob's house, Tib opens the door to her husband. When Cob accuses her of immorality, Tib denies and calls him a liar. When Cob shows her the warrant for Bobadill's arrest, Tib obeys her husband's instructions of locking the door and goes into the house. Later, Tib talks to Knowell, telling him his son is not in the house. Kitely enters and, thinking that Knowell is his wife's secret lover, accuses Tib of being their bawd. Cob enters and, on hearing the accusations against his wife, beats her. All leave to take their case before the judge. In the final revelation scene, Tib is reconciled with her husband, who calls her an honest woman.

TIB **1601

Chiause's wife in Percy's Arabia Sitiens. She tries to deter her husband from persecuting Friar Dervis and once Pyr takes Chiause away, she arranges to meet Dervis for sex.

TIB **1634

Mentioned by Mrs. Generous in Heywood and Brome's The Late Lancashire Witches, Tib is a witch called upon to help frighten the Soldier at the mill. She has no lines ascribed to her specifically, and it is unclear whether she appears in the play at all, but she is perhaps meant to be understood as one of the undifferentiated "Witches" that appear in the play.

TIBALDO NERI

Alphonsina's brother in Dekker's Wonder of A Kingdom, Tibaldo Neri is secretly in love with Dariene, Lord Nicoletto Vanni's wife. Like Vanni, he is a secret lover. His and Vanni's schemes to gain access to the women they love drives much of the play's complex plot. Lovesick for Dariene, Tibaldo begs his sister to advise and help him to seduce her. Alphonsina refuses, telling him to forget her. However, when Alphonsina receives Lord Vanni's letter and the jewel, Tibaldo recognizes an opportunity to gain access to Dariene. He finally persuades his sister to accept Lord Vanni's invitation and disguises himself as a woman to accompany her. On their way Tibaldo explains to his sister what he intends to do: Alphonsina must promise to sleep with Lord Vanni the next night, thus enticing him away from his wife. Meanwhile, Tibaldo will disguise himself as a woman and ask Dariene to be "her" bedfellow. The scheme fails when Dariene's daughter, Alisandra, thinks that the disguised Tibaldo is his own sister, Alphonsina, offers to share her bed, and reveals her own secret love for Tibaldo. After Alisandra leaves, Tibaldo confesses to Alphonsina that he has changed his mind about Dariene, and wants to marry Alisandra. He and Alisandra then receive Lord Vanni's consent to marry.

TIBALT

See also "TYBALT."

TIBALT DUPONT

Tibalt Dupont is a friend and comrade of Albert in Fletcher and Massinger's The Sea Voyage. He supports the demand of the Master to throw the ship's cargo overboard, mocking the obsession of the gallant colonizers Lamure, Franville and Morillat to save their belongings. Tibalt refuses to let the gallants take a large share of the Portuguese treasure, and fights with them. He rescues Aminta from Lamure, Franville, Morillat and the Surgeon when they plan to kill and eat her. When the 'amazons' arrive, he volunteers to allot each man to a woman, assigning Clarinda to Albert, Crocale to the Master and Rosellia to himself. He advises the other men to use the Portuguese treasure to woo the women, not realizing that it once belonged to them. Tibalt and the Master are placed in the custody of Crocale, who is impressed with their cheerfulness and bravery. Crocale takes Tibalt with her when she goes to the other part of the island to find Sebastian and Nicusa. They return just in time to prevent Rosellia from sacrificing Albert and Raymond. Tibalt claims Crocale for his wife, a result that seems to please her.

TIBERIO **1605

Hercules' son in Marston's Parasitaster, or The Fawn. He is a professed hater of womankind sent by his father to arrange a union with Dulcimel. While presenting Hercules' portrait to Dulcimel, his attraction to her causes him to praise his father faintly. However, he does not realize his love for Dulcimel until Gonzago warns him against loving her. He confides in Hercules/Faunus (not recognizing his father) that he is attracted to Dulcimel, but is distressed at the idea of betraying his father. When Gonzago accuses him of loving Dulcimel, he protests, but then joyfully realizes that Dulcimel is using her father to convey her love instructions. He confides in Hercules/Faunus, who advises him to be truthful with his father, but Tiberio decides against it, in spite of Hercules/Faunus' pretended sarcasm about Tiberio's selfishness. Gonzago banishes Tiberio from the court but also unwittingly conveys Dulcimel's explicit instructions for secretly marrying. He follows them, and their union is blessed by both Dukes at the play's close.

TIBERIO **1638

Tiberio is the disguise adopted by Rosania in Shirley's The Doubtful Heir.

TIBERIO'S SON

A non-speaking part in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. A guest at the Capulet feast.

TIBERIUS CAESAR

I.
Tiberius, Emperor of Rome in Jonson's Sejanus His Fall. He is at first confident in Sejanus, but when Sejanus asks to marry Tiberius' recently-widowed daughter-in-law, the Emperor realizes Sejanus' ambition. He plots with Macro to have Sejanus tricked into presenting himself at the Senate house. Once there, the Emperor orders Sejanus' arrest and execution for treason. Tiberius is a corrupt man and a corrupt leader. He is susceptible to flattery, self-indulgent to the point of hedonism, and lascivious. According to legend, the part of Tiberius was originally played by William Shakespeare.
II.
Tiberius becomes emperor of Rome in the anonymous Tragedy of Tiberius. He begins the play feigning great lamentations over Augustus' death. He resents his mother, Julia, who obviously wishes to be the power behind his throne. He fears Germanicus, who may wish to lead his German legions in a coup. He sends Germanicus to Armenia where he has him poisoned. He proceeds to have his mother, Julia, and two enemies, Sabinus and Asinius, poisoned by Sejanus. He has Germanicus' sons imprisoned, where they starve to death. He tries to poison Agripinna but watches as she is strangled instead. In the course of the play he stabs no fewer than six messengers and servants and poisons his own son. He is killed at last when Caligula gives him a drink from the river Styx contained in a mule's hoof and then smothers and stabs him while the Emperor writhes in agony from the drink.
III.
A "ghost character" in May's Julia Agrippina, mentioned as having offered a precedent for a Claudian to adopt.
IV.
Only mentioned in Jonson's The Alchemist. Mammon hopes to discover by alchemy the elixir of eternal youth and exceptional sexual prowess. He fantasizes about his future sexual encounters, which will happen in soft beds, in an oval room hung with licentious pictures, similar to those taken by the Roman emperor Tiberius from Elephantis and Aretine. Tiberius Augustus was the first Roman emperor, who died AD 14. When he became emperor, Tiberius was 56 years old, but he would rule for nearly 23 years and leave the empire more stable and prosperous than it had been. Yet, for all of the positive aspects of his reign, Tiberius is remembered as a monster and tyrant. Historians describe him as a man who had practiced every imaginable vice and who tortured and killed with ferocity.

TIBERO

Tibero, a Lord in Massinger's The Duke of Milan.

TIBET TALKAPACE

With Annot Alyface, Tibet Talkapace is one of Dame Custance's maids in Udall's Ralph Roister Doister. As her name suggests, she is given to chatter and is especially fond of clichés and homely proverbs.

TIBULLUS

I.
Tibullus is a poet in Rome and a friend of Ovid in Jonson's Poetaster. Tibullus enters Ovid's house in Rome, apparently to take him for a walk, but he brings Ovid a letter from Julia. At Albius's house, Tibullus enters with the other poets and their ladies. When Albius calls Chloë out on some household pretext, the guests feel free to speak openly about love. Like Ovid, Tibullus has come to Albius's house to meet his mistress Plautia socially. After light conversation and music, the guests depart for the banquet hall. At Albius's house, Tibullus and Gallus enter, prepared to escort Chloë and Cytheris to a masquerade ball at court, at Princess Julia's invitation. When Crispinus sings a poem apparently dedicated to Chloë as Canidia, Gallus discovers it is plagiarized from Horace and the poets start to argue. Tibullus exits with the entire party to the ball at court. Tibullus disguised as Bacchus enters an apartment in the palace, together with the entire party of poets and their ladies, each characteristically dressed as gods and goddesses. All the masks play their assigned roles. During the entertainment presided by Ovid/Jupiter, Tibullus/Bacchus enjoys the revelry. When Caesar enters and rails at the debauched party, it is understood that Tibullus shares the poets' disgrace. In an apartment at the Palace, Tibullus follows Caesar and his train, composed of Gallus, Horace, and Maecenas. Caesar announces he has pardoned Gallus and Tibullus because he needs poets in the city. Tibullus acknowledges his gratitude to Caesar and addresses him in flattering verses. Tibullus attends the public disgrace of the foolish Lupus and the braggart Tucca, as well as the poetasters' arraignment. When justice is served, Tibullus joins the chorus of the court poets, praising Caesar's justice and generosity and he exits with the court. The historical Albius Tibullus (54–19 BC) was a poet of ancient Rome. His poems deal mostly with love and country life. Tibullus was a Roman knight, remarkable for his good looks and conspicuous for his personal elegance. He holds an important place among the writers of elegy. Three books of elegy are transmitted under the name of Tibullus, but only the first two are certainly by him. Tibullus wrote love elegies to two mistresses, Delia (whose real name was Plautia) and Nemesis. When Ovid praises the immortality of poetry, he says that Tibullus's love verses will be recited eternally, till Cupid's fires are out and his bow broken.
II.
Only mentioned in Jonson's Epicoene. Albius Tibullus (54?–19 BC) was a poet of ancient Rome. His poems deal mostly with love and with country life. Compared to his contemporary Propertius, Tibullus was a gentler and more refined poet, in whom grace and melodiousness took the place of Propertius' fire. These two poets both used the metrical form called the elegiac. At his house, the self-conceited Daw boasts his learning and poetic talent, while Clerimont and Dauphine deride his pompousness covertly. Daw shows his contempt for many great minds of classical antiquity. When Clerimont asks him about the classical poets, Daw refers to them in a deprecating manner, including Tibullus in the long list of unworthy poets.

TICKET

Ticket is a courtier and husband to Lady Ticket in Brome's The City Wit. He owes Crasy money but refuse to pay him back. He attempts to seduce Josina; this attempt becomes the means by which Crasy retrieves the money Ticket owes him.

TICKET, LADY

Lady Ticket is the wife of Ticket in Brome's The City Wit. Crasy tricks Pyannet into thinking that her husband Sneakup is having an affair with Lady Ticket.

TICKLEMAN, NAN

A London artisan in Cooke's Greene's Tu Quoque. Tickleman loans Spendall forty shillings only to realize that he has extorted those monies along with those of a number of other acquaintances. Along with his wife Sweatman, he watches with approval when Spendall is arrested and his property seized, encouraging the Sergeants to hang the "rogue."

TICKLER

Only mentioned in the anonymous Narcissus. Ticker is a juggler. Narcissus mentions him when he explains to Florida and Clois that if he loves anyone, that is "Tickler and Piper."

TIERESIAS

See also TYRESIAS.

TIERESIAS

The celebrated blind soothsayer (spelled Tyresias in Gascoigne and Kinwelmershe's Jocasta) is summoned by Creon to foresee the city's fate; after observing the sacrifice, and pretending to the priest that all will be well, he tells Creon that only by the sacrifice of the latter's son Menetius can the city escape destruction.

TIFFANY, MISTRESS **1605

A "ghost character" in Middleton's Your Five Gallants. One of Tailby's conquests, who sends her Servant to him with a ten pounds in gold. The servant is told that the money is a returned deposit for out-of-stock lawn: in fact, it is a well-disguised gift to preserve the appearance of the gentlewoman's honour. Tailby takes time to praise her resourcefulness above many of other conquests.

TIGELLINUS

Loyal and ruthless commander of Nero's Praetorian Guard in the Anonymous Tragedy of Nero. He is responsible for tracking down and eliminating the conspirators, a duty he turns into an extensive witch-hunt. He takes a personal delight in incriminating the innocent Petronius, amongst others. When Nero flees Rome, he accompanies him after other "friends" desert him. Nero blames the people's hatred on his advancement of Tigellinus; an ambiguous stage direction suggests that he too deserts Nero at this point, leaving the Emperor to die alone.

TIGELLINUS, HERMOGENES

Hermogenes Tigellinus is a court musician in Rome in Jonson's Poetaster. At Albius's house, Hermogenes enters with the poets and their ladies. When the poets in Ovid's party want to make light and innocuous conversation, they address Hermogenes. Gallus asks him why he is so sad, and Hermogenes responds he is a little melancholy with riding. After being entreated several times, Hermogenes finally accepts to sing for Chloë's guests, only after he has been challenged by Crispinus, who offered to sing instead. Hermogenes sings with accompaniment about a fickle lady who plays with her lover's passion. After light conversation and music, the guests depart for the banquet hall. Hermogenes disguised as Momus enters an apartment in the palace together with the entire party of poets and their ladies, each characteristically dressed as gods and goddesses. All the masks play their assigned roles. During the entertainment presided by Ovid/Jupiter, Hermogenes/Momus enjoys the revelry. Though Hermogenes plays Momus, the god of criticism and reprehension at the Ovidian party, he sings a song with Crispinus/Mercury celebrating the feast of sense and the delight in the beauty of the eye. When Caesar enters and rails at the ribald party, it is understood that Hermogenes disperses.

TIGER

A familiar spirit in Heywood and Brome's The Late Lancashire Witches, Tiger is called upon by Witch 3 (see under Witches) to carry her away from the interrupted witches' Sabbat celebration in IV.i.

TIGRANES

Tigranes is the king of Armenia in Beaumont and Fletcher's A King and No King. Before Tigranes enters the stage, it is learned that he has been captured by Arbaces, king of Iberia. Tigranes does not appreciate the way Arbaces constantly brags about his victory over the Armenian. Tigranes initially refuses to marry Arbaces's sister Panthea because he is secretly devoted to Spaconia; however, as soon as Tigranes sees Panthea, he forsakes Spaconia and falls for the Iberian princess. Tigranes is arrested by Arbaces for speaking to Panthea on account of Arbaces's incestuous passion. Tigranes finds himself in an awkward position, since before meeting Panthea he had covertly found a position for his lover Spaconia in the Iberian court. Tigranes soon regrets his fickle actions and devotes himself once again to Spaconia. Tigranes is abused further by Arbaces when the latter suspects the Armenian king is secretly pursuing Panthea. Tigranes is also confronted by Spaconia's father Ligoces and accused of whoring the Armenian maid. Finally, Tigranes is freed by Arbaces and accepted as a son-in-law by Ligoces.

TILER

Tiler is an impoverished workman in Cokain's Trappolin. He is accused of having fallen from a roof onto Barne's son, thereby killing him. Trappolin, disguised as Duke Lavinio, condemns him to die by having Barne fall from a roof onto him. Both plaintiff and defendant find the sentence outrageous.

TILER, HUGH

A tiler in Drue's The Duchess of Suffolk. Enters with Jenkin as well as roof tiles and a ladder. Before beginning work, leaves with Jenkin for a pot of ale and a toast to warm up. Returns with Jenkin to meet Clunie and the watch searching for Sands; denies seeing Sands, and is arrested by Clunie for aiding Sands' escape. Brought by Clunie before Bonner and Gardner, who readily accept Clunie's charge of aiding Sands' escape and demand that he be burned at the stake. After arrival of news concerning the Duchess, Hugh Tiler and Jenkin are forgotten; Foxe advises them to go home rather than wait for Bonner and Gardner's return.

TILLY **1634

Only mentioned in Glapthorne's Albertus Wallenstein. Commander of the forces of the Catholic League, and after Wallenstein's first fall from power also made Commander of the Imperial army. During the action of the play, his military reputation has declined after his defeat by Gustavus Adolphus, leading to Wallenstein's recall to service by the Emperor. His fall is discussed by Newman.

TILLY **1635

Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Tilly is mentioned by Sir Conquest Shadow when, telling Doctor Clyster about his imaginary valor, he explains: "I'll tell you, Doctor, all the time of the / German War I have overthrown the Emperor I cannot tell how many times, Tilly in many a battle, Bucquoy before, Wallenstein afterward and made Pappenheim fly like atoms in the air with my great ordnance. And so methought Swede and I came to play for the empire ... won the game, and so established the Princes of the Empire ..." Johan Tserclaes (Jan Tserkales) was Count of Tilly (1559-1632), general of the army of the Catholic League in the Thirty Years' War.

TILTYARD

A feather-seller of London in Middleton and Dekker's Moll Cutpurse, The Roaring Girl. Tiltyard's name refers to courtyards used for jousting tournaments. Tiltyard is more interested in sport than work, leaving his wife Mistress Tiltyard to run his shop while he hunts.

TILTYARD, MISTRESS

Wife of Tiltyard, a feather-seller in Middleton and Dekker's Moll Cutpurse, The Roaring Girl. She tries to sell Jack Dapper a feather.

TIM

See also under "TIMOTHY."

TIM **1607

Apprentice to Rafe's character in The Grocer's Honour portion of Beaumont's Knight of the Burning Pestle. He becomes squire to the "grocer errant" Knight of the Burning Pestle and, according to Nell, doesn't say a sensible thing until halfway through the play.

TIM **1611

The foolish son of the goldsmith Yellowhammer in Middleton's A Chaste Maid in Cheapside. He is a pedantic Cambridge youth. His father wishes him to marry Whorehound's niece, a wealthy Welsh gentlewoman who owns "nineteen mountains" and 2,000 head of runts. In order to impress her, Tim speaks Latin. Not understanding him, the woman speaks Welsh. They misunderstand each other to high comic effect. He marries the punk before discovering she is a whore, but she proclaims herself made honest by marriage and he is satisfied.

TIM **1627

A quibble of a name in the anonymous Wisest Have Their Fools. The lawyer Hilarius may use the name "tim" in reference to his clerk, Bond, whom he calls to come with him. It could equally refer to a "Master Seller" whom they are going to meet. Or it could be a corruption in the text and not a name at all.

TIM BLOODHOUND

The obedient, but dim-witted Tim is being trained as his father's heir in the usury business in William Rowley's A Match at Midnight. He is in charge of the 'petty pawns'. His brother Alexander furtively pawns a diamond ring, and Tim agrees to bring him the money while running an errand for his father. Tim meets Alexander in a tavern, where his brother's drinking companions get Tim drunk, and make him pay for all their drinks. They also gull him into proposing marriage to a whore, Sue Shortheels whom Tim thinks is a Greek princess. When he arrives at the wedding party in the final scene, Tim has to admit to his father that he has spent the money he was supposed to collect. The truth about Sue is revealed before any marriage can take place.

TIM ITEM

He is the apothecary in Jonson's The Magnetic Lady. He is called in to assist Doctor Rut in treating Placentia's "dropsy" (actually pregnancy). Worried about his practice if he is discovered to have lied about Placentia's pregnancy, he convinces his friend Needle (the tailor) to join him in pretending to be mad so that they can't testify to the fact of the birth.

TIM TREBLE

Tym Treble is the joking name the Foole assigns to Stremon's Boy in Fletcher's The Mad Lover.

TIMAGORAS

Timagoras, the son of Archidamus in Massinger's The Bondman, councils Leosthenes to be patient in his pursuit of his sister, Cleona. When he finds that Marullo (Pisander in his slave disguise) has won the love of Cleona and now lies in chains in the jail, Timagoras attempts to kill him. He is stopped by Archidamus.

TIMANDRA

Timandra and Phrynia are the two mistresses who follow Alcibiades on his march towards Athens in Shakespeare's The Life of Timon of Athens. Timon calls them prostitutes and gives them gold to continue in their profession and carry their diseases to the Athenians.

TIMANTE

A lord and courtier of Castile in Montague's The Shepherd's Paradise.

TIMANTUS **1608

Timantus is a courtier of the duke Leontius in Beaumont & Fletcher's Cupid's Revenge. He is ambitious and amoral, flattering Leontius and conspiring with Bacha against Leucippus. Timantus urges Leucippus to flee from Leontius, telling him that his apprehension is about to be ordered, and offers to take him to a safe house; Ismenus tells Leucippus not to trust Timantus, but Leucippus goes with him nonetheless and is brought before Leontius. Timantus reveals to Bacha that Urania has fled, and is sent by Bacha to assassinate Leucippus. He reaches Leucippus and runs at him, but Urania takes the blow and is mortally wounded. Leucippus accuses Timantus and fights a duel with him; wounded, Timantus reveals Urania's true identity.

TIMANTUS **1631

Timantus is one of three eunuchs of the emperor's chamber in Massinger's The Emperor of the East. The others are Chrysapius and Gratianus. They are at first suspicious of Pulcheria and her motives but change their minds when they realize she is only attempting to protect her brother. Chrysapius becomes a conspirator with Pulcheria as they scheme to curb Theodosius' generosity. Pulcheria tricks Theodosius into signing his own wife into slavery.

TIMARCHUS **1632

Pamphilus' real name in Randolph's Jealous Lovers. Demetrius reveals at the wedding near play's end that Pamphilus is Techmessa's brother Timarchus, and both are Chremylus' children.

TIME **1553

I.
A "ghost character" in Udall's? Respublica. Father of Verity, said by Avarice to disclose everything he sees.
II.
Time is the chorus of the anonymous Guy Earl of Warwick. He delivers an introduction to each act and a conclusion to the play.
III.
An allegorical figure in [?]W. Rowley's The Thracian Wonder. He interrupts the Chorus by setting down an hourglass to represent the amount of time conventionally displayed in a play. The Chorus confutes Time by turning the glass over.
IV.
Time speaks the Prologue and the Epilogue of the anonymous A Larum for London. He complains that people regularly disregard Time's warnings but suggests that the audience might be different and pay attention to this forewarning.
V.
Time fulfils a choric function in Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, introducing the second portion of the play (IV.i) and explaining that sixteen years have elapsed between the end of the third act and the beginning of the fourth.
VI.
An allegorical figure in the usual form of an old man in Dekker's The Whore of Babylon, he appears in the dumb show with which the play begins dressed in mourning; even his iconographic properties (scythe, hourglass and wings) are black. In dumb show, he tries desperately to awaken his daughter, Truth, but cannot do so and instead sits down beside her to mourn. At the sight of the funeral of a queen (by implication, Queen Mary), she revives, and he and his daughter cheer up considerably and exit to change their garments for lighter, more regal ones. They greet Titania, present her with a holy book, and drive out the noxious "cardinals, friars, &c" that had attended on the dead Queen Mariana. Later, he arrives at Truth's lodgings to command her and Plain Dealing to help him confound the works of Falsehood. He fights on Titania's side against the Babylonian Armada by cutting down Babylonian princes and destroying their ships. After the Fairy forces defeat the Babylonians, Time conducts Titania and her counselors to witness the anger of the Empress.

TIME **1601

Time is a true and virtuous friend recommended by Arete to Crites and a mute character in Jonson's Cynthia's Revels. When Crites complains to Arete about the multitude of his seeming friends, the virtuous nymph tells him that detraction is short-lived, inviting him to spend a few hours with honored friends, Time and Phronesis. According to Arete, in their company Crites will be able to think and compose verses worthy of Cynthia's eyes. Time and Phronesis are part of Cynthia's train and they enter with her at the revels. Time and Phronesis retire with Cynthia's retinue after the ceremony.

TIME **1612

Time is a character in "The Triumph of Time," the final play within the play of Fletcher's Four Plays in One. Jupiter sends him to release Anthropos from the bands of Poverty and Want.

TIME **1626

A part taken by one of the Roman soldier masquers performing in honour of Titus's Triumph in Hemminge's The Jews' Tragedy. They appear as Time, Piety, Temperance, Chastity, Friendship, Constancy and Patience. Their masque underlines the royal virtues of Titus and incites him to judgement of the prisoners-of-war.

TIMENTES

A fearful general in Wilson's The Swisser. Timentes is afraid of everything, even of a mouse. Against his own wishes, his kinsman Antharis has made him general, to cross the plans of his enemy, Clephis. Timentes is incapable as a military leader, but he tries to convince himself by boasting. After the soldiers' mutiny the King has to replace Timentes, and Arioldus becomes the new general. After Arioldus' victory, Timentes tells the King of a beautiful captive in Arioldus' house. In front of Clephis' house he has overheard the end of Alcidonus' and Selina's conversation and believes that two gentlemen are going to have a duel at nine in the garden grove. He tells this to Antharis, who wants him to accompany him and intercept them. But Timentes is too afraid that he might be killed in the process. Andrucho, Asprandus and Iseas then come with a coffin to play a trick on him. They tell him that soldiers seek revenge because he shouted at them when they wanted to resist the enemy. He hides in the coffin, and they change their voices and say that they are going to burn him or throw him into the sea. When they reopen the coffin, he seems dead. They become afraid that the trick was too good and that they are now guilty of murder. When they carry the coffin away, they meet Antharis, who promises to have Timentes avenged. Timentes then wakes up, and Antharis grows angry because he sees this was a jest played on him, but Timentes still believes that he has been saved by his friends. Desperate to become less fearful he starts to drink and begins to fight with everybody, even with Antharis over the bodies of the supposedly dead lovers, Selina and Alcidonus.

TIMEROUS—FEARALL**1636

Timerous is convinced by the other Passions to agree to Prudentius' overthrow in Strode's The Floating Island, although he does not actively engage in it. He is in love with Fuga and brings her a poem, but he is too timid to read it. When Fancie wishes for more ladies-in-waiting, Concupiscence and Hilario decide that Timerous should be dressed in Fuga's clothing and made into a woman. Hilario persuades Timerous to dress up by telling him that both Malevolo and Irato want to duel with him. Once he is in female clothing, he is almost ravished by Audax, who believes him to be Fuga. Timerous tells Fuga what he has suffered for her, but when she rejects him, he declares he will resume male clothing. At Desperato's party, he decides to poison himself after Desperato tells him a sleeping potion will kill him gently. After Prudentius returns, he learns that he may not marry Fuga.

TIMEUS **1635

The king’s son and Eudora’s brother in Killigrew’s The Conspiracy. He prefers to see his king in battle that at banquets. He tells the king that a foreign prince has been forced to their shores by a storm. He learns from Coracinus that his assassins were found by fishermen. He tells Eudora to avoid the newly arrived prince, Clearchus, and send back any presents he may proffer. Later, the king finally listens to Timeus’ fears and gives his son license to root out any evil he fears in the kingdom. He learns that Aratus, Phronimius, and Eurylochus are the secret leaders of the rebellion. He hates the look of Pallantus, and has Coracinus and Argestes fight Pallantus; they almost lose until Timeus himself enters the fight. Pallantus escapes them, but Timeus offers a rich reward for the first man to bring back Pallantus’ head. When Aratus reveals that he met the man after a shipwreck, Timeus pieces out that it is none other than Pallantus he seeks, and he spies on Aratus to lead him to the man. The king has two traitors captured and Polyander reports that two others were taken in the court. When the city governor comes to warn of growing rebellion in the countryside the king is finally convinced that Timeus is correct and treason is afoot. He takes control of the kingdom’s defense for his father, but when Pallantus assassinates the usurper, Timeus is filled with grief and rage. Timeus calls for support from Clitus, Charisius, Erastus, and Amathes but none answer his call. He prepares to commit suicide and is prevented by the captain and two guards, who bid him to take up the crown. When the fight is lost, he allows himself to be persuaded to fly to a foreign shore and seek a new army when he may safely slip away. Timeus, Menetius, Poliander, Comastes, and a captain take refuge in a fort. Pallantus treats peace with the usurpers and convinces them of the new king’s mercy. They follow him. Pallantus takes Timeus to Eudora, who upbraids him with the letter he wrote ordering Pallantus’ assassination. When the young king comes to call upon Eudora, Timeus begs to be allowed to withdraw as he is not yet ready to stand before the king.

TIMIDA**1636

The name given to Timerous when he is in female clothing in Strode's The Floating Island.

TIMIDITY **1617

A “ghost character" in the anonymous Pathomachia. One of the twenty-five vices that are the extremes of the eleven virtues. Temerity and Timidity are the extremes of Fortitude.

TIMIDO**1618

A "ghost character" in Holiday's Technogamia. Cheiromantes predicts that Music will have three sons, Melancholico, Timido, and Jucundo. The second is predicted to be in danger of being bitten by a mad dog, but if he escapes that he will live to fifty.

TIMILLUS **1636

Melintus’s friend in Killigrew’s Claricilla. A saucy fellow who rails at fighting but fights well at the siege of Seleucus’s villa. He jests with Melintus, despairing that Claricilla is honest and therefore not to be shared between friends. He assists Melintus and Claricilla in their plan to escape to Messina. He seconds Melintus in his duel with Seleucus. He fights Carillus and is defeated. He demands that Melintus leave before the king comes to arrest him. He tells Melintus to put on a new disguise and go again to court. After Melintus unwillingly flies, the king comes and has Timillus taken to be tended in the town so he can stand trial for the mischief. He sends word to Claricilla by Appius that Melintus escaped safely. Jacomo learns that Manlius has “betrayed" Melintus and runs to warn Timillus that he is in danger. He promises to meet him at midnight with horses for his escape. He berates matrimony, saying that he has slept with a hundred wenches with less danger that this one wooing of Melintus’s. The final moment of the play sees Timillus dashing across the stage with a rope in his hand for his escape. Upon hearing the music and laughter of the wedding party, he realizes he is safe and delivers a final epigram on his delivery from harm.

TIMOCLEA **1584

Timoclea is one of the women captured at Thebes by Alexander in Lyly's Campaspe.

TIMOCLEA **1607

Timoclea is the wife of Borgias, Governor of Florence in Mason's Mulleasses. She is also Mulleasses's lover. Timoclea's life is imperiled when Borgias asks Mulleasses to poison her. Borgias plans to bury Timoclea in Julia's coffin. Instead of poisoning Timoclea, Mulleasses drugs her into a deep sleep. Mulleasses wakes Timoclea and tells her that Borgias contracted her death and that Amada has stolen Mulleasses's love. Timoclea is coerced into appearing as a ghost before both family members. She kills Amada and scares Borgias into leaping from a ledge. Mulleasses then spurns Timoclea. Timoclea is subsequently duped by Borgias into believing he is a ghost. In despair, Timoclea allows Borgias to strangle her with her own hair. Bordello finds her body and is temporarily blamed for her murder.

TIMOCLEA'S GHOST

Timoclea disguises herself as her own ghost in Mason's Mulleasses. Timoclea is coerced into appearing as a ghost before Amada and Borgias. When Timoclea returns as a ghost, Julia convinces Amada to confer with the ghost alone. Timoclea kills Amada and scares Borgias into leaping from a ledge. While waiting for Bordello, Fulsome and Phego are frightened off of the stage by the "ghost" of Timoclea. She also frightens Eunuchus, and when Eunuchus dashes across the stage pursued by the ghost-like Timoclea, Ferrara stabs Eunuchus to death. Timoclea is subsequently duped by Borgias into believing that he is a ghost. In despair, Timoclea allows Borgias to strangle her with her own hair.

TIMOLEON

Timoleon, the general of Corinth, is made head of state for Syracuse in Massinger's The Bondman. His first decree is the confiscation of all private money. Cleora offers him her jewels if it will help keep the soldiers safe. The act touches him deeply, and he asks her if he might wear her colours in combat. He leads the army successfully against Carthage, returns to put down the slave revolt, and, finally, presides over a court that decides the fate of Marullo (Pisander in disguise as a slave). He is compassionate, offering amnesty to the slaves, and marriage for Marullo and Cleora.

TIMON **1626

Name taken by Antonius in May's Cleopatra. He takes it in a fit of crazy depression after his defeat at the Battle of Actium. Timon was a famous Athenian misanthrope of the 5th century BC. Antonius is visited by Aristocrates and Lucilius; Aristocrates tries to help Antonius by playing along with his new identity, introducing himself as Alcibiades, the destructive general favoured by the historical Timon.

TIMON **1619

A servant to Antigonus of twenty-five years in Fletcher's The Humorous Lieutenant. Timon, along with Charinthus and Menippus, is instructed to assist the king in pursuing Celia.

TIMON of ATHENS

I.
Timon, the son of Echeratides the Collitensian (V.6), is a rich young Athenian in the anonymous Timon of Athens who loves to spend his money in parties with his friends. His servant Laches advises him to keep his gold locked up, but Timon wants to scatter it among his friends and among the commons and the poor. He gives Eutrapelus 5 Talents, although he only wants 4. He releases Demeas on his way to the prison with 16 talents, asking for nothing but friendship in return. His false friends and followers (Hermogenes, Gelasimus, Pseudocheus, Eutrapelus, Demas, Oppa, and Laches as Machaetes) elect him the souvereign of the "Bacchanales" before the wedding between Gelasimus and Callimela, but Timon defers this office to Lollio. When he sees Gelasimus' bride Callimela, he falls in love with her at first sight. He sends Machaetes (Laches) to tell Philargurus that he would marry her immediately, even without a dowry. Callimela accepts this new courtship when she hears that he is richer than Gelasimus. During the wedding ceremony a shipwrecked sailor appears and tells Timon that he has lost all his ships and all his money. Callimela and all his friends leave him now. He asks Eutrapelus and Demeas for a place to sleep, but they pretend not to know him. Hermogenes tells him to go and hang himself, and Speusippos and Stilpo tell him to cover himself in virtue if he needs clothes. Alone, Timon laments his fate and curses his former friends. His faithful servant Laches comes, but Timon thinks he is Revenge and sends him to invite all his false friends to a new banquet. When they are all assembled, he serves them stones painted like artichokes and throws them at them till they leave. Only Laches (as Machaetes) remains with him. When he discovers his true identity to Timon, he still wants to hate him because he now has sworn to hate every man. Together they curse all humanity, and Timon starts to dig his grave. When Gelasimus finally finds out that he has been duped by Pseudocheus, and that he has lost everything, Timon offers him his grave, but Gelasimus just wants to help him digging. As they dig, Timon finds gold. He wants to drown it, but Laches tells him he could use it for his revenge. When his former friends hear of his new riches, they all appear again. Callimela wants to marry him again, and all start to beg till Laches drives them away with his spade, Timon remains on the stage for his epilogue in which he tells the audience that his heart is growing mild again, he wants to lay aside his hate and intends to return to Athens.
II.
A rich Athenian lord who has spent all his riches for his friends in Shakespeare's The Life of Timon of Athens. They come to his banquets with small gifts and receive generous presents in return. Flavius, his steward, tells him that there is nothing left of his money and his lands. Timon is deeply in debt, and when he asks them, none of his friends is willing to help him. Once more he invites all his false friends to a banquet, and they all come because they think that he might still have money left. But he offers them stones and water, throws the water in their faces and drives them out of his house by throwing the stones at them. Disappointed by his friends, he leaves Athens to become a misanthrope in the woods. Digging for roots he finds gold and becomes rich again. Alcibiades comes with his army, accompanied by Phrynia and Timandra. Timon is pleased to hear that they march against Athens, and he gives them some of his gold:
  • to Alcibiades for the destruction of Athens,
  • to the two ladies to spread their venereal diseases all over the world.
Apemantus has heard that Timon has become, like himself, a cynic, and he comes to see him. After a long dispute filled with mutual insults Timon drives him away with stones. Three banditti, deserters from Alcibiades' army, have heard that Timon has found gold. Timon encourages them to continue in their honest profession (stealing) and gives them gold. When Timon discovers that Flavius, his steward, has remained faithful to his master, he concedes that there is one honest man left in the world. Flavius is given gold and told to follow his master's example and hate and avoid all men. The poet and the painter have also heard of Timon's gold and come to promise further works, but Timon insults them and drives them away with stones. Flavius then reappears with two senators: Athens needs Timon's help against Alcibiades and his army. Timon is invited to become Athen's new leader, provided with absolute power. He declines, and retires to his cave to write his epitaph and to die. Alcibiades sends a courier with a letter asking for Timon's help in his war against Athens, but the soldier only finds Timon's grave. He copies the epitaph and brings it to Athens, where Alcibiades, who has just conquered the city, reads it out:
Here lie I, Timon, who alive all living men did hate.
Pass by and curse thy fill; but pass, and stay not here thy gait.
III.
Only mentioned in (?)Shipman’s Grobiana’s Nuptials. Grobianus likens himself to Timon, who hated men for their foolish courtesies.

TIMOTHY **1605

A "ghost character" in Dekker and Webster's Northward Ho. The Bawd, a patient of Bedlam (mental hospital), thinks that Bellamont is one Sir Andrew, and that he has got a brother named Timothy.

TIMOTHY **1613

Timothy is a taborer in Shakespeare's Two Noble Kinsmen, a musician for the morris-dancers who plan to perform for the Duke.

TIMOTHY **1615

A fantasy character in Tomkis’ Albumazar. After Antonio cannot rightly tell Trincalo his name (as Trincalo has threatened him if he calls himself Antonio again), Trincalo calls him Timothy.

TIMOTHY **1626

A member of the Watch in Jerusalem and sidekick to the comic Oliver in Hemminge's The Jews' Tragedy.

TIMOTHY **1627

Neighbor of and debtor to the usurer Cremulus in the anonymous Wisest Have Their Fools. He promises to repay principal and double use to redeem his lands after missing his time. The repayment ruins him, and he quickly falls into debt again. He despairs and attempts to hang himself, but in tying up the rope to a roof beam he discovers a bag of gold that Cremulus had hidden there. He takes it and leaves the rope in its place. He goes to "the devil at St. Dunstan's" (the Apollo?) to celebrate his good fortune. He celebrates with Monsieur Carouse, Lais, and Bebia until he runs completely through the money and is again left destitute.

TIMOTHY **1635

Timothy serves as an intermediary between other characters and Lady Marlove, informing her of their intentions and actions in ?Glapthorne's The Lady Mother. Timothy, Grimes, Crackby and Suckett find Lovell passed out in a drunken stupor, and apply plasters and a bloodied handkerchief to his head. Timothy participates in the search for Belisia and Bonville after they elope. At the end of the trial of Young Marlove for the murder of Thurston, Grimes, Timothy, Clariana, and Thurston enter in disguise and offer to perform a masque to instruct the condemned Lady Marlove. They perform a dance, then reveal themselves to her, explaining that Thurston and Young Marlove had concocted the plot to reveal Lady Marlove's error to her.

TIMOTHY **1637

Seathrift’s son in Mayne’s City Match. He has been a rioter in the Temple and drank wine at his father’s cost. With his father away at sea, he’s resolved to roar and enjoy himself. He aspires to be an Inns of Court man like Bright and Newcut and to take a part in their next masque. He engages in a war of wits along with Bright, Newcut, and Frank, and she bests them. He is pleased later to learn from Frank the lady wishes to marry him. He is made drunk and the others dress him as a strange fish caught in the Indies and charge a shilling for people to come stare at him. He weeps when he hears that his father has drowned and made him an heir but only because his mother didn’t die, too. He is shocked a moment later when his father unmasks and disowns him. He agrees to participate in Frank’s plan, and comes to Aurelia dressed fantastically as a knight. He marries Aurelia and goes ahead of her (in mid-afternoon) to await her in bed. He appears again in the final scene happily married.

TIMOTHY (TIM) HOYDEN

Supposed son to Hoyden, a country yeoman, he is known at home as "little Tim of Taunton" in Brome's The Sparagus Garden. With "a little learning, and a little wit" (both, as it turns out, dangerous things), he has come up to London to become a gentleman. Enlisting the help of Sir Hugh Moneylacks, he declares himself willing to spend four hundred pounds in service of his aim. By the time Sir Hugh brings him to the Asparagus Garden to complete his education with a dinner of the genteel vegetable, he has spent about three hundred pounds and is aware that he has been "cozened," but is still determined to stick to his plan. He sacks his servant, Coulter, when the latter criticizes his foolish profligacy. He then vows that his first act as a gentleman will be to help Rebecca and Brittleware to get a child. In thrall to his cozeners, he insults his brother Tom when the latter arrives. However, he has a rude awakening when Sir Hugh and his friends strip him, dress him in women's clothes ("felony by the law," as Trampler remarks), and send him to his uncle's house. There, he discovers that his true father was not Hoyden but Touchwood, and that he was thus a born gentleman all along.

TIMOTHY PLUSH

Mr. Plush is a humorous gallant in ?Brewer's The Country Girl. He has also come to see Lady Mosely. He meets Barbara as the lady in the middle end of Lymestreet.

TIMOTHY SHALLOWIT, SIR **1638

An ill-favored country knight in Glapthorne’s Wit in a Constable. He is a fool who agrees with Thorogood that he is the most egregious knight in the country, lives on onions and corn-salads, and whose father died a knave and so left Sir Timothy one as well. He has come to town to court Grace. He lets Valentine do all of his talking, interrupting only long enough to agree with what he says, until Grace is quite taken with Valentine. He agrees to have Valentine disguise as his niece to get him closer to Grace, thinking that Valentine intends to woo in the knight’s name. When the disguise is almost immediately revealed, he tries for a moment to uphold that Valentine is his niece. He is forced to agree that the women who have so entertained a man in their chambers would not be fit for his wife. Covet convinces him that the women are proper, and he cannot decide whether he should take Clare or Grace, so Jeremy and Sir Timothy engage in a dialogue of “whichever you like, I’ll have the other" that only makes both look more foolish. The women assure Sir Timothy and Jeremy that they will make them terrible wives. Thinking they jest, both men take them at their word and agree to be complacent cuckolds and to marry the women immediately but in such secrecy that absolutely no one will know of it. He bribes the watchmen four groats as he, Jeremy, and Grimes make their way through London by night with a sedan chair. When Busie suddenly inquires what’s in the sedan chair, they are obliged to retreat. He marries “Luce" (Maudlin intended) by mistake when the women disguise themselves as Clare and Grace. He declares himself happy with the match for Jeremy’s sake.

TIMOTHY SHIRKE**1629

Another suitor for the hand of Pecunia in Randolph's(?) The Drinking Academy; he is appalled to hear that she now favors Knowlittle. He enlists the aid of his friends Bidstand and Nimmer first to steal letters from Pecunia to Knowlittle and then to pretend to be Pecunia's Ghost and Pluto, so that they can steal money and clothes from Knowlittle, Worldly and Whiffe.

TIMOTHY, SIR

One of the disguises adopted by Sencer in Thomas Heywood's The Wise Woman of Hogsdon. As "Sir Timothy," Sencer pretends to be a rival scholar to Sir Boniface, humiliating him before his employer, Sir Harry. By making Sir Boniface's Latin appear obscene to the ignorant Sir Harry and his servant Taber, "Sir Timothy" insinuates himself into Sir Harry's household, but is thwarted and humiliated when he reveals his true identity.

TIMOTHY ("TIM") TAPWELL

Timothy Tapwell is "an alehouse keeper" and the husband of Froth in Massinger's A New Way to Pay Old Debts. He, along with his wife at the play's beginning, shows his ingratitude to Welborne's former charity by refusing to serve him at Marrall's command. Born on Welborne's father's land, Tapwell was a former servant to Old Sir John Welborne and "under-butler" to Welborne. After the death of Welborne's father he apparently bought a small cottage with money given to him by Welborne and started his bawdry business, from which he claims he has saved enough money to be thought worthy of being a "scavenger" and, hopefully, of becoming "overseer of the poor." When Welborne receives a sum of money from Overreach and is able to repay his debts Tapwell frets that the prodigal will expose his bawdry; nevertheless, along with Froth he approaches Welborne for payment of a debt, and although Froth is hopeful of Welborne's mercy, they attempt to bribe Justice Greedy into forcing Welborne to repay them. Instead, their tapping and drawing license is revoked by Greedy (who is successfully bribed by Welborne) and they are sent away with nothing. Although Froth is disappointed when Welborne is unmerciful, Tapwell admits that it is his due punishment for being an "unthankful knave."

TIMOTHY TESTY, SIR

Sir Timothy is an old angry bankrupt knight with two daughters, Sabina and Mirabell in Chamberlain's Swaggering Damsel. Being asked about how much he is to bequeath to his daughter, Sabina, he announces that he is to give her 1,000 blessings, but no money at all. In Act Three, he is informed of the recent events. He flies into a rage and calls her own daughter a whore and he blames Hilts for letting people enter his house. Thus, he asks Hilts to go to look for his cousin Muchcraft to ask for help. He wants to know if entering a house at night might be considered to be trespassing. Being explained about his rights, he sends a bunch of Officers to look for his daughter Sabina. In Act Five, he wants to arrest Valentine but he still has the heart to forgive him if he marries her. With the wedding, he wins a loyal servant and gives his two daughters, Sabina and Mirabell, to Valentine and Fairefaith, respectively.

TIMOTHY THINBEARD

A servant of Thomas Gresham in Heywood's 2 If You Know Not Me. He doubts the honesty of John Gresham. Later, Timothy is condemned to death for stealing, but is aided by Hobson.

TIMOTHY TREDVARGES

A "ghost character" in Mountfort's The Launching of The Mary. One of the workers in the shipyard. His name is called out by the Clerk of the Check.

TIMOTHY TROUBLESOME, SIR

Sir Timothy Troublesome is a jealous knight in Sharpham's Cupid's Whirligig. He abuses his chaste and devoted wife by accusing her of various extramarital affairs. After suspecting then forgiving his wife several times, Troublesome decides to free himself from jealousy by having himself castrated. When his wife shows him a letter from Young Lord Nonsuch, Troublesome plots to catch his rival, but does not recognize the young man through his disguise and sends him off with his wife. After Lady Troublesome rejects Young Lord Nonsuch, he leaves the house and meets Troublesome, who now recognizes him and is convinced again of his wife's infidelity. Troublesome unwittingly hires Young Lord Nonsuch, disguised as the begging soldier Slacke, as a servant. After reconciling with and rejecting his wife several times, Troublesome announces he will divorce her and marry her cousin Peg. His servant Wages attempts to reconcile his mistress and master, but Troublesome persists in his belief that his wife is unfaithful. Led into the whirligig scene by Cupid, Troublesome confesses his love for Peg and is rejected by her. Troublesome and his Lady are revealed to be one of the four masked couples who join Cupid in a dance; they have inadvertently re-married.

TIMOTHY TWEEDLE**1600

A piper and friend (side-kick) of Jack Drum in Marston's Jack Drum's Entertainment. Tweedle brags about his expertise with the pipe and with women, but it isn't clear whether he means his pipe attracts women or women are attracted by his sexual prowess. Whenever Drum appears in the play, Tweedle is usually with him–he too is at the final festivities.

TIMPANINA

Timpanina is a bawd at whose house Abstemia dwells in Act Four of Davenport's The City Night Cap.

TINDERBOX–MAN

In Jonson's Bartholomew Fair, the Tinderbox-man sells mousetraps and a contraption he calls "a tormentor for a flea." Like the others at the Fair, he advertises his trade.

TINGITANS

Inhabitants of Squilmagia, according to Pseudocheus in the anonymous Timon of Athens.

TINKER**1609

Dallies with Dorothie in Beaumont and Fletcher's The Coxcomb. They accost Viola when they happen upon her in the middle of the night; they tie her up, and steal her belongings.

TINKER

The jovial tinker coming to drink at an inn is a fictional character in Jonson's The New Inn. Lovel wonders why Host, who seems to have good education and be of noble stock, chooses to be a mere innkeeper, exposed to his customers' rude behavior. Lovel presupposes the case in which a jovial but inebriated Tinker may yell at Host to give him some more drink, and the innkeeper must serve him readily. Actually, Lovel's idealistic concept of honor and self-discipline greatly differs from that professed by Host.

TINKER **1627

Included among the disgruntled tradesmen in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. He complains of being out of work now that Plutus has made all honest men rich. He agrees with the other tradesmen–attorney, tinker, miller, tailor, shoemaker, etc. –to combine into an insurrection. Nothing comes of this, however, in the play, and they are not seen again.

TINKER BOY

A disguise that Toures uses to sing in front of the Lady in Armin's The Two Maids of More–Clacke. Being disguised, he drinks a lot together with his boy. Despite being drunk, he sings publicly. His song is about a sad woman who is sick, but nobody knows the reason of the pain which ends up to be a fruit. He disguises to see his beloved Mary as Jove had done to visit Danae in the Classical mythological story.

TINKER, TOM **1641

In Wild’s The Benefice, he tells Fantastes how tinkers and scholars are alike. Fantastes pays him twelve pence to beat Scuttle. He does so and finds a book of characters in Scuttle’s pockets.

TIPPLE **1560

Tipple is an alewife at the Swan in the anonymous Tom Tyler And His Wife who brings drink to Strife and Sturdy and gets them to sing and dance about how his wife treats Tom Tyler, and to sing another song about the joys of drinking. After the attack on Strife, Sturdy and Tipple discuss the amazing change in Tom Tyler's behavior. They offer Strife help to bandage her wounds. When Strife turns on her husband, having discovered the trick, Tipple and Strife enter to stop the beating and help Tom Tyler escape. Along with Sturdy and Strife she celebrates the story of Tom Tyler and his wife in song, explaining how Tom Tyler failed to win despite his trickery.

TIPPLE **1602

A "ghost character" in Middleton's The Family of Love. A tapster mentioned by Gerardine as a criminal who must appear in court.

TIPSTAFF, SIR ANDREW**1606

A Courtier in Middleton's(?) Puritan. He is a suitor to Frances, whom he marries.

TIPSTANES

Tipstanes comes to court as a messenger of Equity in the anonymous The Contention Between Liberalitie and Prodigalitie. Once there, he acts as the usher in the courtroom.

TIPTO

Colonel Tipto is a Spanish braggart, one of Lady Frampul's suitors, and a guest at the New Inn in Jonson's The New Inn. Prudence calls him ironically "Sir Gloriosus," an allusion to the type of vainglorious knight. Tipto enters with Fly and has a conversation with him, in which he reveals his low intellect. When Host enters, and Fly introduces him as the patron of the house, Tipto boasts his extensive but circumscribed knowledge of fencing. Tipto launches into a specialized debate on fencing techniques, quoting the most famous Spanish fencing masters, while Host and Fly ridicule Tipto-s narrow-mindedness. When Host exits with Lady Frampul's party, Tipto remains with Fly, and the party of merry servants joins them presently. The company of drunkards gossip and drink heavily, until the whistle sounds for dinner and they disperse. Since Tipto hears of Bust and Huffle, two adventurers who enjoy drinking, he exits to join them. In a room at the inn, Tipto is drinking with Bust, Huffle, and Fly. Soon, Tipto starts a quarrel with Bust over the Spaniards' composition of character. The quarrel is interrupted when Pinnacia and Stuff as Trundle enter, but Tipto maintains his bellicose attitude and restarts the fight with Bust, to Pinnacia's horror. Lady Frampul's party enters, and the gentlemen comment ironically on Tipto's aggressiveness. Tipto attends the second session of the mock love court, whose subject is valor. During Lovel's speech on valor as the greatest virtue of mankind, in which he holds that virtue must not be dominated by anger, Tipto intervenes with a contrary opinion. Tipto tries to say something on the subject of bravado, probably to the effect that man should follow the rule of his passion, but Beaufort and Latimer avert his line of thought, alluding to the Spanish fencing masters. Lovel tells Tipto to go away, because Colonel Gloriosus should not be present when they speak of bravery. Tipto goes out and does not reappear in the final reunion scene.

TIRE–MAN

The Tire-Man attempts to move Sly and Sinklo from the stage during the Induction to Marston's Malcontent.

TIRIDATES

A "ghost character" in May's Julia Agrippina. He is one of the two Princes of Armenia from whom Nero receives ambassadors in the Senate.

TIRIL

Tiril is a man of few scruples in Thomas Heywood's 2 Edward IV and is hired by Gloster as a murderer. He is given a warrant ordering the deaths of the two young princes held in the Tower. He carries the warrant to the Tower; his confederates Dighton and Forrest commit the actual murders. (See also "TYRRELL, SIR JAMES")

TIRSO

A kinsman of Lisauro and friend of Bellides in Fletcher and Rowley's The Maid in the Mill. Tirso and Lisauro quarrel with Antonio and Martine. Later, he encourages Vertigo to behave as a lord in order to gull Franio.

TIRTENA

Tirtena is one of Ceres' nymphs in Lyly's Love's Metamorphosis. When Erisicthon cuts down the tree-nymph Fidelia, Ceres sends Tirtena to set Famine on the husbandman.

TISICK, MASTER

Master Tisick is a deputy representing the alderman of a London ward in Shakespeare's 2 Henry IV. Mistress Quickly reports her conversation with Tisick concerning swaggerers in her tavern.

TISIPHONE

See also TYSIPHONE.

TISIPHONE

I.
A fury in the anonymous Rare Triumphs Of Love And Fortune who instigates a debate between Venus and Fortune as to which one holds more power in the world.
II.
One of the Three Furies appearing in the First Dumb Show of Hughes' The Misfortunes of Arthur. Although only Alecto (whose name means "never ceasing") is named, and named only later in the play, the other two Furies (or Erinys) are Megaira ("Grudger") and Tisiphone ("Avenger of Blood"). See under "Furies."
III.
A fury in Wilmot's Tancred and Gismunda. She arises from hell with Alecto and Megaera, and the three of them dance. Tisiphone, along with Alecto, is sent back to hell by Megaera.
IV.
A "ghost character" in Wilson's The Cobbler's Prophecy. One of the Furies. Melpomene warns that Tisiphone will whip cruel executors.

TITAN

Eldest son of Uranus, brother of Saturn in Heywood's The Golden Age. Involved in the initial power struggle between him and his younger brother after the death of Uranus. Saturn is the people's choice to rule them since they believe that Titan (the rightful heir) is proud and insolent. In order to avoid war and bloodshed, and after Titan's violent threats, a covenant is made between the two brothers: after Saturn's death, the kingdom of Crete should be inherited by Titan's heir, and, in order to ensure the compact Titan requires Saturn to kill all his infant boys in their cradles, a condition to which Saturn agrees. After learning about the secret survival of Saturn's sons, Titan and his sons attack Saturn, a battle in which he is slain by Jupiter.

TITANIA

I.
Titania is the queen of the fairies and wife to Oberon in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Because she refuses to give Oberon her Changeling Boy, Titania suffers enchantment from a love-flower, falling passionately in love with Nick Bottom, whose head has been transformed by Puck into that of an ass. After turning over the Chageling Boy to Oberon, the spell is released; Titania and Oberon reunite and together bless the marriage beds of the newlyweds at play's end.
II.
The Fairy Queen in Dekker's The Whore of Babylon, in whom Dekker figures the late and much-lamented Queen Elizabeth I. She first appears in the wake of the dead Queen Mariana's funeral during the dumb show that begins the play, attended by counselors and others fitting her status as a queen. Truth and Time, who present her with a book that she kisses, greet her with great joy. She welcomes both the counselors who previously served Queen Mariana and "certain grave learned men that had been banished." In the play proper, the Empress of Babylon angrily describes her as a "strumpet enchantress" who has stolen the affections of the Empress' subjects and defamed the Empress as a Whore. Nevertheless, Titania refuses to respond to the Empress' attempts on her life with similar violence. She even seems briefly interested in the proposals of the three foreign Kings against whom her counselors so vehemently protest, but she soon shows that this was a ruse by declaring that she will accept them only when Catholic rituals prove efficacious and "lawyers swear to take fees—and that I hope will never, never be." Her refusal of the Empress' overtures leads to a number of plots against her life, all of which she must punish. She reluctantly condemns her kinswoman, the Moon (Mary, Queen of Scots) to death; Campeius and Ropus, their treasons discovered, are similarly doomed. Her wisdom, clemency and resemblance to her grandfather, Elfiline VII, so impress the embittered Paridel that he falters repeatedly in his determination to kill her; just as he finally gets up his nerve to do so, he is betrayed by his cousin and apprehended by Titania's counselors. Having vanquished this threat, Titania organizes her forces to fight against the encroaching Babylonian Armada. She appears in person at their camp at Beria (Tilbury) and declares her love for soldiers and the martial life. In the end, she exults in her final triumph and thanks Time for granting her the opportunity to witness the ruin of the great Whore of Babylon.

TITERUS

A "ghost character" in Daniel's The Queen's Arcadia. Meliboeus says that he discovered Pistophoenax debating the "rites and mysteries" of Pan with Titerus.

TITHING MEN

Only mentioned in (?)Speed’s The Converted Robber. Autolius boasts that he has an ‘undaunted spirit’ that could choke a constable along with his dam’s tithing men and still outface the charge.

TITINIUS

I.
Titinnius laments with Brutus and Pompey after the defeat at Pharsalia in the anonymous Caesar and Pompey. After Caesar's funeral he warns Brutus of the mood of the people, and after the defeat at Philippi he brings Cassius word that Brutus still lives, but is too late to prevent Cassius's suicide, and therefore kills himself.
II.
Friend of Brutus and Cassius in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, Titinius is mistakenly thought to have been taken prisoner at Philippi. Still at liberty, however, Titinius finds the dead Cassius; miserable, he kills himself.

TITIUS **1617

A “ghost character" in Goffe’s Orestes. Whilst being stabbed, Agamemnon awakes and imagines his enemy Titius has clothed himself in the skin of Aegystheus, his friend and kinsman, to do this deed.

TITIUS, MARCUS

Follower of Antonius in May's Cleopatra, but, like Plancus, disaffected from the very start through disapproval of Antonius's infatuation with Cleopatra. He defects to Caesar even before Antonius's defeat at Actium.

TITIVALE, TOM

A "ghost character" in Udall's Ralph Roister Doister. Tom Titivale is one of the individuals Merrygreek admits to having sponged from before taking up with Ralph Roister Doister.

TITTERUS

A merry shepherd who sings songs throughout [?]W. Rowley's The Thracian Wonder. Titterus rescues Radagon from the shipwreck. He is a love-hater and a misogynist, but as soon as he sees Ariadne, he falls in love. He is cured when he observes the madness that love has caused in Palemon and Antimon He begs Serena to love Palemon, and after the battle, persuades her to cure Palemon of his wounds. When she does, and Palemon's madness is also cured, Titterus repents of his misogyny.

TITUS **1592

Only mentioned in the Anonymous A Knacke To Knowe A Knave. When Osrick welcomes King Edgar, he says the king is as welcome as was Titus to the senate of Rome. The simile is strained, but it seems a to allude to Shakespeare's play Titus Andronicus or maybe to an earlier version, Tittus and Vespacia (as "Vaspasian" is also mentioned three times).

TITUS **1600

A "ghost character" in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. Titus is nephew to Orsino. He lost his leg in a sea battle in which Antonio was involved, although it is not clear if Antonio himself cost Titus his leg.

TITUS **1607

A usurer's servant in Shakespeare's The Life of Timon of Athens, like most of the servants he carries his master's name. He is one of the besiegers of Timon's house in II.ii. and III.iv. Timon owes his master fifty talents.

TITUS **1626

A "ghost character," Titus is the deceased older brother of Domitian in Massinger's The Roman Actor who preceded him as Caesar.

TITUS **1626

Son and colleague to Vespatian in Hemminge's The Jews' Tragedy. He embodies the Roman martial virtues and is a heroic protagonist. He accompanies his father to pacify Judea, remaining there to continue the wars after his father's accession as Emperor. He fights Josephus, then befriends him as an honorable prisoner-of-war. He later welcomes Josephus back from exile as a partner in diplomatic attempts to negotiate peace in Jerusalem. When that fails, he fights all three Seditious Captains in single combat, is wounded, but escapes. He is furious at the massacre of Jewish refugees, and later he grieves at the destruction of the Temple. He presides in judgement in the final scene after being entertained with a Masque performed in his honour by his soldiers. He entrusts authority in Jerusalem to Josephus, condemns Jehochanan and Skimeon, pardons Peter and shows great compassion for Miriam.

TITUS **1631

Titus, a spy in the service of Flaminius in Massinger's Believe As You List.

TITUS ANDRONICUS

Titus Andronicus is a Roman nobleman who has served as a General in the war against the Goths in Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus. After returning to Rome with the Goth prisoners, Titus permits the execution of Alarbus, the son of Tamora, as a human sacrifice, which causes Tamora to seek revenge against Titus and his family. The false conviction of Martius and Quintus for Bassianus's murder and the rape and mutilation of Lavinia cause Titus to bewail the suffering of his family. Aaron tricks Titus into chopping his hand off as a ransom for Martius and Quintus, and later sends Titus a platter containing the heads of the two sons along with his own hand. Titus's desire for vengeance intensifies when Lavinia reveals to him and Marcus the identity of her attackers by writing the names of Chiron and Demetrius in the sand. Titus's anger is accompanied by an apparent madness, most notably when he urges his family members to shoot arrows containing messages to the gods at the sky. Titus arouses Saturninus's anger when he sends him two pigeons and a message wrapped around a dagger. Tamora attempts to drive Titus further into insanity by pretending to be the spirit of Revenge, and Titus continues the cycle of revenge by killing Chiron and Demetrius and then baking them into a meat pie that he serves to Tamora at a banquet. At the banquet, Titus kills Lavinia for bringing dishonor on the family. After revealing the contents of the pie, Titus kills Tamora. Saturninus then kills Titus.

TITUS DOMITIUS

Like Sossius, Domitius leaves Rome in the middle of his consulship to support Antonius against Caesar in May's Cleopatra. Discouraged by Antonius's behavior and lack of success, he later deserts to Caesar. [For the name of this character, May was misled by Suetonius in his Life of Augustus; his real name was Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus–Shakespeare's Enobarbus. The historical character died shortly after his defection to Caesar; May does not include this detail, but it explains why he does not appear at the end of the play with the other apostates.]

TITUS VOLTURTIUS

Titus Volturtius, a native of Crotona, is a member of Catiline's conspiracy and a mediator between the conspirators and the Allobroges in Jonson's Catiline. At Sempronia's house, Volturtius enters with the other conspirators, expecting Allobroges. When Cethegus announces their arrival, Volturtius exits, and then he informs Lentulus that Allobroges desire to speak with him in private. After the discussion, Lentulus reports that Allobroges required letters describing the conspirators' plans, which they were going to provide, together with sealed letters to Catiline, whom Allobroges were expected to see on their way to their country. Volturtius is to accompany Allobroges to Catiline. Volturtius exits with Allobroges. At the Milvian Bridge, the praetors intercept the party, and Allobroges surrender easily, despite Volturtius's protestations. Seeing that all is lost, Volturtius tries to strike a bargain, promising to give all the names of the conspirators if his life is spared. When the conspirators are tried in the Senate, Volturtius incriminates each of them by name. After his testimonial, Volturtius is granted his life and some money. Cato adds that money would help Volturtius, because want had made him join Catiline's conspiracy.

TITYOS **1601

Only mentioned in Percy’s Cuckqueans and Cuckolds Errants as having his guts eaten by a ‘heart-devouring bird’ where Ixion is tortured on a wheel and ‘the thief’ rolls a stone to and fro.

TITYOS**1602

Only mentioned in Percy’s A Country Tragedy in Vacunium. At Florimel’s death, Fulvia calls down curses on Clodio’s departed soul, hoping he will dwell in torment with Sisyphus and Tityos. She recalls Tityos again in her own death speech, alluding to his ‘baleful curse’.

TITYRUS **1585

The name is used twice in Lyly's Gallathea:
  1. Tityrus is a shepherd, and Gallathea's father. He convinces her to disguise herself as a boy in order to avoid the sacrifice to Neptune, and he argues with Melebeus about having possibly hidden his own daughter.
  2. It is also Gallathea's name when she is in disguise.

TITYRUS **1601

Only mentioned in Jonson's Poetaster. Tityrus is the shepherd in Virgil's Eclogue I. Meliboeus, observing Tityrus unabashedly reclining in the shade and composing pastoral verse in the face of the impending Roman incursion, inquires about the identity of the god that has provided his leisure. Tityrus expresses his feelings of how Rome, under the leadership of a powerful god therein, has raised her head among the other cities. Realizing that the increasing might of the Roman Empire, and its assimilation of foreign lands, has made possible the traversal of vast distances, Tityrus broods about the futility of trying to preserve their present pastoral realm as the specter of Rome approaches. Tityrus is often identified with Virgil himself. When Ovid praises the immortality of poetry, he says that people will read of Tityrus as long as Rome is the head of the entire conquered world.

TITYRUS **1637

Only mentioned by Dorus in (?)Speed’s The Converted Robber in reference to the music Dorus has composed in honour of Avonia.

TIVERIA, ALONZO

A "ghost character" in Fletcher and Massinger's Spanish Curate. Leandro's recently dead father. Leandro fabricates a letter of introduction and signs it with the name Alonzo Tiveria in order to ingratiate himself with Lopez. Of course, Lopez and Diego do not remember Alonzo at first; they never met him, but their memories quickly "return" after Leandro mentions the five hundred ducats that will be paid to Lopez as a gratuity for finding a law tutor for Leandro. Lopez and Diego go on to describe their "old friend" as a "grave staid gentleman" with a white beard, a good posture, and a reputation as a brave soldier.

TOBACCO **1607

One of Olfactus’s train in Tomkis’ Lingua. King of Trinidado. He wears a taffeta mantle with naked, brown arms. His buskins are made with the “pilling of osiers," bare neck hung with “indian leaves." His face is painted brown with blue stripes and swine teeth in his nose. He wears a hat of painted wicker with tobacco pipes and tobacco leaves for plumes. He speaks the language of the Acadians who lived long before the moon.

TOBACCO–DRINKERS **1611

“Ghost characters" in Dekker’s Match Me in London. Bilbo says sweet breath is not to be found amongst them.

TOBACCO–MAN

The Tobacco-Man, the Captain,, the Traveller and the Poet are hangers-on to Young Loveless in Beaumont and Fletcher's Scornful Lady. They urge him to spend his money on drink and women, and are retained by him even after his marriage to the Widow. The Poet and the Captain are extremely loquacious, but the Traveller says little and the Tobacco-Man nothing at all.

TOBACCO–SPAWLING

With Starch-hound, Upshotten, Suckland and Glitterbacke, Tobacco-spawling is a devil in Pluto's hell in Dekker's If It Be Not Good.

TOBIAH

A "ghost character" in Bale's God's Promises. Mentioned by John Baptist as an example of a virtuous man.

TOBIAS PARMISAN

One of Master Correction's pupils in Sharpham's Cupid's Whirligig. Tobias is identified as the son of the cheesemonger.

TOBY **1611

Toby is the coachman to Maria's mother in Fletcher's The Night Walker. On the night of Maria's wedding, Wildbraine mistakes Toby for Mistress Newlove and seduces him. When Maria's mother cuts off her support to Wildbraine, Toby offers to help him by cheating and stealing from her. The two go bell-ringing together; while doing so Lurcher robs them of their clothes and possessions.

TOBY **1621

Toby is the Barber's apprentice in Middleton's Anything for a Quiet Life. In Front of Sweetball's house, Franklin as "Sir Andrew" pretends to need a brush and sends Toby to fetch it. Thus, Franklin manages to dispose of any potential witness to the fact that the cloth of gold from Chamlet's shop was being taken away without paying for it. When Toby returns with the brush, Franklin tells him he is a good boy and takes the brush. Presently, Sweetball summons Toby to help him with his intended surgery on Ralph. In the Barber's surgery, Toby fetches the cauterizing red-hot iron, which Sweetball intended to use on Ralph's penis. Toby tells the Barber that the gentleman who calls himself his "cousin," meaning Franklin as "Sir Andrew," has taken away his new brush. The news infuriates Sweetball.

TOBY **1630

Toby is Josina's brother and Crasy's brother-in-law in Brome's The City Wit. His parents have purchased a position at court for him. Toby owes Crasy money but refuses to pay him back. He hopes to marry Jane Tryman, and this ambition becomes the means by which Crasy retrieves the money Toby owes him.

TOBY BELCH

Sir Toby Belch is the uncle of Olivia and apparently living off of her in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. He is a boisterous drunkard, and therefore constantly at odds with Malvolio. He is friends with Sir Andrew Aguecheeck, and has convinced that gentleman that he has a chance to marry Olivia. Sir Toby, Sir Andrew and Feste engage in a night of drunken singing, aided by Maria, and are roundly condemned by Malvolio. They therefore decide to take revenge on him by convincing him, through a forged letter, that Olivia is in love with him. The plan is carried out, although when Malvolio muses out loud how he would treat those beneath him once he is married to Olivia, Sir Toby becomes so angry he can barely remain hidden. Once Olivia is convinced that Malvolio is mad or possessed, she turns him over to Sir Toby's care; Sir Toby promptly has him confined in a dark cell. Meanwhile, Sir Andrew has realized that Olivia is in love with the disguised Viola and Sir Toby must simultaneously convince Sir Andrew that Olivia is merely pretending to make him jealous and maneuver the jealous but timid knight into a duel. Sir Toby and Fabian bring Viola and Sir Andrew together for the duel, although both are terrified, but they are interrupted by Antonio, who believes Viola is Sebastian. After that fight is broken up by the arrest of Antonio, Sir Toby and Sir Andrew meet and attack Sebastian, but are stopped by Olivia, who leads Sebastian away. Sir Toby and Sir Andrew finally get to fight, but instead of the timid Cesario they encounter Sebastian and are soundly beaten. After accusing Viola of being the attacker, Sir Andrew and Sir Toby are helped off, so they are not present for the final revelations, but Fabian tells the others that Sir Toby has married Maria to reward her for her part in fooling Malvolio.

TOBY HAGGIS

Toby Haggis is a member of the watch in Jonson's Bartholomew Fair. Haggis appears with Bristle to restore order at the Fair, apparently at Whit's summons. After having proved their superior intelligence in front of the Fair people, Haggis and Bristle leave. Later, Haggis and Bristle bring in the madman (alias Overdo) to be put into the stocks. When Trouble-all keeps asking for a warrant from Justice Overdo, Haggis discusses with Bristle the stern justice that Overdo delivers. When Poacher and other officers bring in Busy to be put on the stocks, Haggis says they will take both prisoners before Justice Overdo. Haggis and the officers leave with Overdo/Madman and Busy, but they cannot find Justice Overdo. Wasp manages to get away by using a trick, and Haggis and Bristle must run after him, leaving the two prisoners in the stocks. When they return, Bristle says he forgot if he had locked the stocks. Since Trouble-all is confusing them with his questions, Bristle and Haggis leave the lock open and the prisoners escape while the officers are fighting with the madman. Seeing that the prisoners have escaped Haggis and the other members of the watch blame it on witchcraft, and they do not follow the runaways.

TOBY TURFE

High Constable of Kentish Town, husband to Dame Sybil Turfe and father to Audrey in Jonson's A Tale of A Tub. After Audrey draws the name of John Clay as her Valentine, Turfe and his wife decide the young couple should marry on that very day, as they themselves married thirty years ago. A bit of a miser, he resists his wife's attempts to throw an ostentatious wedding for Audrey. He is dismayed when the disguised Basket Hilts accuses his prospective son-in-law, John Clay, of being the leader of a gang of thieves, but dutifully takes him to Paddington Jail. While he and his constables commiserate with Clay, Turfe receives the news from Puppy of Audrey's abduction. Squire Tripoly Tub enters and quickly convinces Turfe that the abduction and the accusation against Clay (both actually his own device) were part of Justice Preamble's plot to steal Audrey. Turfe snatches Audrey away from Preamble just in time to prevent that marriage. In retribution, Canon Hugh, disguised as the pseudonymous "Captain Thumb," accuses Turfe is of conspiracy to protect John Clay, and brings him before Preamble to answer the charges. Turfe suspects the missing John Clay of actually being guilty, and says so to Preamble. To avoid a scandal and a long court battle, he agrees to pay 100 pounds restitution to "Captain Thumb," and to send the money to Canon Hugh for safekeeping. He sends Miles Metaphor with a key to his chest to pick up the money, but is unaware that Preamble has also ordered Metaphor to bring Audrey to Canon Hugh's as well. The money and the bride, however, are intercepted by Squire Tripoly Tub and Basket Hilts. At the Canon's, Turfe learns of the various ruses and demands the 100 pounds from John Clay. When it is discovered that, taken in by her disguise, Canon Hugh has married Audrey to Pol-Marten, her parents, relieved to learn Pol-Marten is a gentleman, bless the marriage. (Also called "Tobias Turfe" by several characters.)

TOCLIO

A British courtier in William Rowley's The Birth of Merlin: or, The Child Hath Found His Father. A functional character, little more than a device for carrying messages and making announcements.

TOLA

A "ghost character" in Bale's God's Promises. Mentioned by David as an example of an upright, virtuous man.

TOM

See also under "THOMAS."

TOM **1586

One of Prince Harry's rowdy companions who rob in jest and fight in taverns in the Anonymous Famous Victories of Henry V. They laugh with the prince at the king's illness, wishing him dead so that they would all be kings through their close friendship with the Prince of Wales. He and his companions are ultimately rejected by Harry after he is crowned Henry V of England.

TOM **1591

Fights with Orlando in Greene's Orlando Furioso against Rodamant and Brandimart.

TOM **1591

A "ghost character" in the Anonymous Locrine. Strumbo sees "Dina and the Ass Tom" in I.iii.

TOM **1599

A rebel under the command of Murley in Munday, Drayton, Hathaway, and Wilson's Sir John Oldcastle.

TOM **1603

A "ghost character" in the anonymous Narcissus. The Porter mentions Tom when he tries to make the choir boys stay. He says that Tom ran under the hovel with a kettle on his head.

TOM **1632

"Tom" is one of several nicknames used by Lord Rainbow in Shirley's The Ball while railing at Bostock on the subject of a supposed family relationship between the two.

TOM ALWORTH

Tom Alworth is the son of the deceased Alworth, the stepson of Lady Alworth, and the young gentleman page of Lord Lovell in Massinger's A New Way to Pay Old Debts. In love with Margaret Overreach, he conspires with her and Lord Lovell to trick her father, Sir Giles Overreach, into assisting their marriage, and is, thus, appointed to deliver Lovell's apparent "love letters" to Margaret, which results in his becoming Margaret's husband and Overreach's son-in-law. A friend of his stepmother's servants and doted on by the Waiting Woman and Chambermaid, Alworth is, at the play's beginning, one of the only characters to offer help to the unfortunate Welborne. At the play's end he is appointed guardian (along with Margaret) of his distracted father-in-law.

TOM ARCHIBALD**1637

A friend of Gilbert and a wholly honorable man in the anonymous The Wasp. He prefers to be though of as "plain, homespun Tom" rather than lord. He tells Marianus that Gilbert has died and also that the barons are treacherously unhappy about Varletti's preferments. He says that the commons will rebel if Varletti is not banished. When war is about to erupt, he talks the barons into supplicating before their Prorex, Marianus. In return, Marianus offers them a paper to sign without reading, which Archibald nobly declines. This act is seen as traitorous, and Archibald is banished. He lives simply in the woods and is on hand to thwart Varletti and Gerald's attempt on Marianus' life. Marianus is on the point of pardoning him when a letter arrives from Varletti that convinces Marianus that Archibald stage-managed the rescue to curry favor. Marianus condemns him to be sent to the mill and grind meal like a workhorse. Though he works a torturous routine, Archibald remains loyal. Conan, disguised as his keeper, reveals the plot to bring Katherine's Uncle Percy back from exile in France to lead the conspirators against Marianus. When Archibald's son breaks the law to bring food to him, Archibald reacts by calling the boy traitor and turning him over to the authorities. As Percy, Archibald takes Marianus' crown during the coop. He seats Gerald and Varletti to a banquet and encourages their revels, then literally turns the table to reveal a banquet of snakes, toads, and newts. He causes Gerald and Varletti to renounce their designs on the throne, loyally protects Marianus, and returns the crown to the Prorex.

TOM BEGGAR

Tom Beggar and Wily Will are an efficient begging team in Wilson's The Three Ladies of London. Simplicity joins them and they sing a song together. But they fool Simplicity out of all the best takings. On the orders of Fraud, they rob Mercadore the merchant.

TOM, BRAVE **1632

In Hausted’s Rival Friends, Loveall fetches in a bedlam to impersonate Oberon after Anteros convinces Stipes that the tree that he is tied to is magic and sits on fairy ground. Merda informs us he has a horn ‘like a Tom of Bedlam.’ He recites an incantation before being hurried off by Loveall when they spy the approach of Hook and Terpander.

TOM CARELESS

Careless is Ned Wild's best friend in Killigrew's Parson's Wedding. At the beginning of the play, the two of them have just returned from three years in France, where he has developed continental tastes. Careless has no tolerance for platonic love. When Lady Wild and Mistress Pleasure invite Careless and his friends to dinner, Careless resists because women like Wild and Pleasure, "take a pleasure to raise a spirit that they will not lay," and he proposes to go to Banks, an ordinary, instead. Early in the play Wild and Careless join forces with the Captain and Jolly, and together they come up with a strange plan to rail against women and marriage in an effort to win the attentions of Mistress Pleasant and Lady Wild. They also help the Captain and Wanton play tricks on the Parson, Wild by pretending to be a justice and Careless by pretending to be a summoner. In return, the Captain helps Careless and Wild to marry Lady Wild and Mistress Pleasant. He persuades Wild and Careless to climb into bed with the ladies and then gives out that the two couples are married. After having been seen by half the town and court in bed with the men, the ladies reluctantly consent to marry them.

TOM CHARTLEY

A trickster ("cony-catcher") in Dekker and Webster's Northward Ho, friend of Dick Leverpool, companion of Doll Hornet. He and Leverpool disguise as Doll's servants to make her victims believe that she is a gentlewoman. Together with Leverpool and Philip he accompanies Maybery's party to Ware.

TOM CATCH **1599

Sergeant in attendance on the Burgomaster in Ruggle’s Club Law. He, Tavie, and Puff fail to capture Cricket after he hits Brecknocke with an apple. Later, he trips over Cricket’s rope and is beaten. He tells Rumford that he fears the “Athenians" know the black arts and that the students will make them all dance naked. After the fight, Puff suggests that Catch has stopped being a sergeant and gone to find work at the university insread. Catch is seen, however, attending and protecting Niphle as he leaves prison.

TOM FLEDWIT **1639

A student of law at the Inns of Chancery in Sharpe’s Noble Stranger. He and Plod join with Mercutio in gulling Pupillus. After all his work getting Pupillus to fancy and then marry Flavia, he and his friends find they have been gulled when Flavia refuses to split Pupillus’ wealth with them. Fledwit goes off with Plod to study mischief while Mercutio resolves to live better and go sober to bed.

TOM LURCHER

Tom Lurcher is a gentleman in Fletcher's The Night Walker. He loses his money to Algripe who agrees to marry Lurcher's sister Alathe but then reneges on the agreement and keeps the dowry. Estranged from his sister and penniless, he turns to thievery to support himself. Lurcher encounters a Boy named Snap who asks to serve as his accomplice in thievery. Together they attempt to steal a chest from Maria's mother but accidentally steal the supposed corpse of Maria instead; they leave it in the cemetery. They rob Algripe then lure him to a remote area where furies threaten him with damnation and Snap, dressed as an angel, brings him to contrition. Lurcher loses his mistress to Wildbraine and then robs him and Toby while they are bell-ringing. He returns Wildbraine's stolen clothes and possessions and concedes the loss of his mistress. At the end of the play Lurcher receives Alathe's dowry from Algripe, and Sbap reveals "himself" as Alathe.

TOM MILLER

Also identified as the "Clowne" in the anonymous Jack Straw. He calls himself Captain Thomas Miller. Speaks many of the comic lines in the play. He is one of the commoners who plans to confront the aristocracy. He shows little respect for clergy, and vows to fight aristocracy even if doing so will mean all the commoners are hanged. He identifies himself as small enough to hide in a quart pot, and later brings a goose on stage that he plans to eat while the group is camped at Blacke Heath. While he is talking about the future positions of the commoners and is oblivious to what is happening, Nobs cuts away the goose's body, leaving Miller to observe that the goose has flown. Miller continues to refer to the goose in later scenes. He burns official debt records. In a soliloquy, Miller observes that people should accept their fates cheerfully because being sorry is foolish. Immediately afterwards he begs the Queen to intercede on his behalf to avoid being hanged. He asserts that he should live in order to keep the alehouses in business. He is swayed by the group to continue with the revolt but warns that they will all hang. Miller is one of the rebels pardoned.

TOM MIXUM **1636

Artless’ apothecary in Glapthorne’s Hollander. He recommends Urinal to Artless’ service. He also sets up a gull, Sconce, for Artless’ son-in-law.

TOM NIMMER**1629

Nimmer is a friend of Shirke's in Randolph's(?) The Drinking Academy and helps him in his plots against Knowlittle. He delivers false messages to Knowlittle and Worldly, telling them both to visit Pecunia and setting up the robbery.

TOM O' BEDLAM **1605

This is the first name and disguise assumed by Gloucester's son Edgar as he hides from those who seek to kill him in Shakespeare's King Lear. As the Bedlam beggar, Edgar observes the rigours that Lear faces on the heath and also guides the blind Gloucester to the supposed heights of the Dover cliffs. Poor Tom, or Tom o' Bedlam, is a common term assigned to lunatics of the period. Bedlam is a corruption of "Bethlehem," a London hospital beyond Bishopsgate used for lunatics from 1402. In 1547 when the king granted the hospital to the citizens, the inhabitants were sent begging with a metal badge on their arms and were then called Bedlams. The use of the name in this pre-Christian play is, therefore, anachronistic.

TOM O'BEDLAM **1635

A "ghost character" in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Tom O'Bedlam is mentioned by Signor Jealousia when he is telling Doctor Clyster about his obsession with horns since he thinks his wife is being unfaithful to him: "For Tom O'Bedlam, he's not so mad as to come in my walk." Tom O'Bedlam seems to be another man obsessed with horns, since Signor Jealousia adds: "But I'll never set him in the stocks again, for with his continual tooting he had almost made me as horn-mad as himself."

TOM ODCOMB, HONEST

Honest Tom is one of several nicknames for Gudgeon in Shirley's The Ball, according to Frank Barker.

TOM PEART

Tom Peart, a carpenter in (?)Heywood's A Warning For Fair Women, runs into his old friend, Will Crow, after having worked since 3 a.m. in constructing gallows for the execution of Ann Drewry, Ann Sanders, and Roger. Neither Tom nor Will iswas sure if the hanging would take place that day, but a crowd was gathering in Smithfield, so they bought each other beers.

TOM SMITH **1600

Also called 2 Smith in the anonymous Thomas Lord Cromwell. He works for Thomas Cromwell's father ("Old Cromwell") with Hodge and Will Smith (1 Smith). He jokes with young Cromwell when the latter asks the smiths not to hammer.

TOM SNOUT

Tom Snout the tinker is one of the rude mechanicals performing Pyramus and Thisbe for the Duke's wedding in Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream. Snout is originally cast as Pyramus' father but ultimately portrays Wall, a talking heap of limecast that wins the backhanded praise of being "the wittiest partition" that the audience has ever heard speak.

TOM STROWD**1600

Tom Strowd is the son of Old Strowd, and, with Swash, provides the comic relief in Chettle and Day's Blind Beggar of Bednal Green. He is first presented as a bit of a dandy; he is devastated when Canbee and Hadland steal his beautiful cloak, but tries to hide how expensive it was from his father. He is easily robbed by the disguised Canbee, losing the 100 pounds that would have helped his father. However, he matures after he falls in love with Bess. He pretends to join with Young Plainsey against Mumford so he can regain the money stolen from him, but in actuality rescues Bess from them. He fights on Mumford's side in the final battle and refuses to use any weapon against Canbee and Hadland but a cudgel, with which he soundly beats them. After the battle, he proposes to Bess, despite his father's objections that she is a beggar's daughter, and Mumford is pleased that he is willing to love her despite her apparent lack of wealth.

TOM STUKLEY

The British adventurer arrives in Ireland with six thousand soldiers, seven ships, and two boats in Peele's The Battle of Alcazar. Stukley is a natural leader who looks to be a king someday. He says that he would rather be the king of a molehill than the richest subject of a monarchy. Persuaded/forced to joined forces with Sebastian and, along with his men, to join in the expedition to Barbary; Stukley fought valiantly at Alcazar until he realized that death among the Moors was inevitable. Then he begged two Italians to kill him, and they do. Stukley lives just long enough to share his life story with his audience.

TOM TABRER

Tom Tabrer is a minstrel in Munday's John a Kent and John a Cumber. He plays the fiddle in the troupe of amateur actors who are to entertain the lords on the night before their wedding. The actors debate which of them should deliver the welcoming speech, and Tom acts as a mediator. Weighing Hugh's rhetorical qualities against Turnop's familiarity with the lords, Tom changes the odds to Turnop's favor and all vote with him. Tom provides the musical accompaniment to the dumb pageant representing Moorton and Pembrooke's names. During the night, the amateur actors rehearse their song dedicated to the ladies in front of the house where the bridegrooms are lodged. Seeing that Turnop is preoccupied and loses track of time, Tom warns it is almost morning and if they do not wake the brides the rehearsal will have been for nothing. When Shrimp replaces Will's song with his song about the ladies' loss, thus waking the lords, the clowns are accused of being involved in the ladies' escape. When Chester demands an explanation from the actors, Hugh thinks that Tom should answer, being the oldest of them all. Tom avoids a straight answer and says only that, as a poor professor of music, no one burdened him with the responsibility of more than two pence, so it is unthinkable that he should be charged with the value of three ladies. Chester sends the clowns and his servants in search of the ladies. At Gosselin's castle, John a Cumber discusses with the actors the play they are going to act before the lords. This play is intended to be a mockery of John a Kent, with John a Cumber playing John a Kent. Yet, the actors arrive after the play is enacted with the real characters acting as themselves, and after John a Cumber is humiliated in the disguise of John a Kent. The actors see the person whom they think to be John a Kent (actually John a Cumber in disguise) and they vent their abuse upon him, as taught by John a Cumber. After they perform this last act of humiliation at John a Cumber's expense, the actors exit to do their daily jobs.

TOM TANKARD

A "ghost character" in [?]Stevenson's Gammer Gurton's Needle. Hodge sees Tom's cow jumping about and thinks it is an omen.

TOM TAYLER

Tom Tayler is a friend of Tom Tyler, who lives his life at ease in the anonymous Tom Tyler And His Wife. At Tom Tyler's request he promises to find a way to get Tyler's wife to change her ways. He gets a cudgel and puts on Tyler's clothes. When Strife enters she beats Tom Tayler mistaking him for her husband. Tayler responds violently and Strife retreats, wounded. He explains to Tom Tyler is detail what he has done and the two sing a song. At the end Destiny points out that people simply have to put up with whatever end they come to, at which Tom Tayler strikes Tom Tyler explaining that he was born to take blows.

TOM the DRAWER

Tom the Drawer is a tapster at the Boar's Head Tavern in Eastcheap in Shakespeare's 1 Henry IV. He shares a round with Prince Hal following the pilgrim robbery joke played upon Falstaff.

TOM the OSTLER

Tom the Ostler is a stableman at the Rochester Inn in Shakespeare's 1 Henry IV.

TOM THUMB

I.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Tom Thumb is mentioned by Master Fright when, on his second visit to Doctor Clyster to have his fears cured, he is asked if the hangings ever trouble him. He replies that his "hanging story of little David had almost killed" him. Later, he points out that "they had made little David no bigger than Tom Thumb." Tom Thumb is the protagonist of an anonymous prose tale published in 1621, which became extremely popular. He was a very little boy, not even as tall as his mother's thumb. In the last four hundred years, many different versions of that original tale have been written.
II.
Only mentioned in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. Penia-Penniless compares her followers to diminutive Tom Thumb.
III.
Only mentioned in Glapthorne’s Wit in a Constable. Thorowgood teases Jeremy Hold–fast that all his learning is fit only to wear a strip of lining proper only for Tom Thumb.

TOM THUMB **1636

A nickname for Captain Pick in Glapthorne’s Hollander.

TOM TINKER **1641

In Wild’s The Benefice, he tells Fantastes how tinkers and scholars are alike. Fantastes pays him twelve pence to beat Scuttle. He does so and finds a book of characters in Scuttle’s pockets.

TOM TITIVALE

A "ghost character" in Udall's Ralph Roister Doister. Tom Titivale is one of the individuals Merrygreek admits to having sponged from before taking up with Ralph Roister Doister.

TOM TOSSE

Tom Tosse, also known as Tomkin, is a friend of Dicke Dicer in the anonymous The Contention Between Liberalitie and Prodigalitie. He is going to accompany Dicer in his search for Prodigalitie. When they finally find him in the company of Money, they pretend not to be seeking the latter, but just their company. Then they mislead him into wasting Money, until this finally deserts the former. Tom will later inform Prodigalitie that money has gone with Tenacity into a far-away country, he is also an accomplice in his murder, but, he and his friend flee at the end, leaving Prodigality alone, to be charged with the crimes.

TOM TRUEPENNY

Tom Truepenny is a boy servant in the household of Dame Christian Custance in Udall's Ralph Roister Doister. He is misled by Dobinet Doughty into thinking the ring and token the latter brings is from the widow's beloved Gawin Goodluck, and along with Tibet Talkapace, Annot Alyface, and Margery Mumblecrust, is chastised by Dame Custance for bringing the unwanted gifts and communications from Ralph Roister Doister.

TOM TWIST

Tom Twist is the name assumed by the disguised Sir Thomas Sellinger in Thomas Heywood's 1 Edward IV when he visits the home of Hobs the Tanner with the also-disguised King Edward.

TOM TYLER

Tom Tyler is a poor laborer in the anonymous Tom Tyler And His Wife who has married Strife, the woman Desire found him. He enters singing a song about his woes, and talks to the audience about them. Rather than being the sheep he had imagined, she turns out to be a shrew. No matter what he does he cannot make her happy. When Strife and her friends are drinking at the pub, he comes in for a beer; Strife beats him and chases him off. Alone he talks of the pleasures of his job as a Tyler, his only problem in life being his dreadful wife. He contrasts his life with that of his friend Tom Tayler whose heart is at ease. He asks Tom to make his wife's life miserable. Tayler borrows Tom Tyler's clothes so that he can disguise himself. After cudgeling Strife, Tayler tells Tyler what he has done and the two men sing a song of celebration about controlling a mare. Tom Tyler enters next in Strife's bedroom and sees her sick. When she bewails his unjust treatment of her, Tom Tyler justifies his actions and explains that it was the disguised Tom Tayler who had beaten her. At this Strife recovers her strength and beats him severely, demanding he go down on his knee to her. Tipple and Strife enter to stop further violence and help Tom Tyler escape. At the end Destiny speaks to him, pointing out that people simply have to put up with whatever end they come to; Destiny can do nothing about it. If Tom accepts the truth of this, nothing will cause him grief. He accepts that he just has to put up with what fortune sends him.

TOM WATTON

The real name of Purser in Heywood and Rowley's Fortune by Land and Sea.

TOMASIN

One of Arsace's courtesans in Chapman's The Widow's Tears.

TOMASINE

Tomasine, nurse to the pregnant Rosimunda in (?)Jeffere's The Bugbears, aids her mistress physically and supports her emotionally.

TOMAZO

Tomazo is a gallant in J.D.'s The Knave In Grain New Vamped. He accompanies Lodowick everywhere but contributes nothing to the plot.

TOMAZO de PIRACQUO

A noble lord, brother of Alonzo in Middleton and Rowley's The Changeling. Tomazo fails to convince his brother that Beatrice-Joanna does not love him. When Alonzo goes missing, Tomazo roams the castle, hoping to discover the murderer and be revenged. Although he is suspicious of both Alsemero and DeFlores, and tries to pick fights with both, Tomazo agrees with Vermandero that Antonio and Franciscus are the likeliest culprits. In the final scene, DeFlores and Beatrice are revealed as the true culprits. Since DeFlores kills Beatrice and himself, Tomazo feels that his thirst for revenge has been satisfied.

TOMAZO PORTACARECO, DON

Sancho, also known as Don Tomazo Portacareco, is a foolish gentleman in ?Middleton and ?Rowley's Spanish Gypsy. He gives his clothes to the band of supposed gypsies and later joins them. He is a ward of Don Pedro, who has matched him to Clara. Sancho plays Lollio in the prodigal son play staged by the gypsies.

TOMIRIS

A "ghost character" in the anonymous Two Noble Ladies and the Converted Conjurer. Blood claims to be descended from "Tomiris, the valiant conquering Queen of Scythia."

TOMKIN

An alternate name for Tom Tosse in the anonymous The Contention Between Liberalitie and Prodigalitie.

TONGALL, MISTRESS

A gossip and pander in Covent Garden in Nabbes' Covent Garden. Her main "humor" is that of trying to find a man for her unseen daughter Jinny, whom she offers to most of the male characters in the play, and of trying to find a woman for Littleword, whom she offers to most of the other female characters in the play. She later introduces Littleword to Dungworthy in Dasher's tavern, leading to comic confusion when Dasher thinks that Littleword is a spy.

TONGUE IT, GOODMAN **1599

A “ghost character" in Ruggle’s Club Law. Though mentioned in the dramatis personae and in the text, he does not actually appear on stage. One of the twenty-four Electors for the Burgomastership. He is not at the roll call of electors and is fined.

TONOMBEY

Son of the Egyptian Soldan in ?Greene's Selimus I Usan Cassanos and ally of Acomat. Joins Acomat and his forces as they head for Amasia to break Selimus' siege. After Acomat's forces encounter Selimus and his army, Tonombey mocks Selimus. After battle begins, Tonombey beats in Hali and Cali and is in turn beaten in by Selimus. He returns to report Acomat's defeat and his own inability to defeat Selimus in combat. Ashamed, he flees the battle.

TONSUS

A courtier in Wilson's The Inconstant Lady. He banters with Seruius and joins him in making fun of Pantarbo and Busiro, Tonsus is often seen with Pantarbo but little heard. On Pantarbo's request he helps Seruius stop the brothers Aramant and Millecert from hurting each other when Aramant draws his sword after learning the Millecert has stolen Emilia from him.

TONY **1615

After Trincalo is gulled into believing that he has been transformed into Antonio in Tomkis’ Albumazar, he puffs himself up and wants great men to call him Tony.

TONY **1622

The disguise of a fool in Middleton and Rowley's The Changeling that Antonio adopts to gain access to the madhouse.

TONY **1624

Tony (also Tonie) is described as "King Frederick's knavish fool" in Fletcher's A Wife for a Month. Although he is the Fool, Tony has less in common with Shakespeare's Feste and more in common with Webster's Bosola. His commentary on the events and people in the play is alternatively misogynistic, moralistic, and mean. None of his actions effects the outcome of the play. For instance, he is the one who lets in the wedding guests, and there is some suggestion that Tony's admittance of citizens and their wives might cause a scandal, but nothing comes of it. Tony also interrogates the candidates for Evanthe's second husband, the Cutpurse, Lawyer, Physician, and Captain, and although he finds them corrupt, his opinion has little influence upon Evanthe's rejection of them.

TONY**1639

Name given by Elinor to Garullo when he is disguised as a fool in Dekker's(?) Telltale. (n.b. The name "Tony" for a fool was popular at least since the time of Middleton & Rowley's The Changeling and was perhaps initiated or at least popularized by that work.)

TONY the DRAWER

Tony is the tapster in Marmion's A Fine Companion, who presents a bill for thirty pounds to Captain Whibble.

TOOKY **1599

A “ghost character" in Ruggle’s Club Law. Luce says that Mr Tooky knows that her husband went on the voyage with “Captaine Carifeild."

TOOTHDRAWER

A fictional character in Wilde's Love's Hospital. Facetia confides in Comastes that a dumb suitor of hers (presumably Piscinus) gapes and shows his teeth so much that he must believe she is a toothdrawer.

TO–PAN

A tinker, and a constable along with Clench, Medlay, and Scriben in Jonson's A Tale of A Tub. He claims to be descended from the Greek demigod Pan, the "great stopper of holes." One of the "Council of Finsbury" that serves as a kind of Chorus to the fortunes of High Constable Tobie Turfe, and who recommend Medlay and Scriben to create Squire Tripoly Tub's masque for Audrey's wedding.

TOPAS, SIR

Sir Topas is the name of the fictional priest played by Feste during the imprisonment and questioning of Malvolio in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night.

TOPHAS, SIR

A Braggart in Lyly's Endymion. He enters at first exclaiming that love is an invention of poets made up to get money writing of it. He uses Latin to chop logic and claims that Mars himself has given him charge over all warriors. His valor, however, is all spent upon killing his "great enemies" the fish, fowl, and sheep of the field. He falls in love with Dipsas and cannot think of war but rather decides to trim his beard, saying, "I feel all Ovid." Later (V.ii) he exclaims, "Love is a lord of misrule and keepeth Christmas in my corpse." He agrees to lose his teeth and nails to be more attractive to Dipsas, but he finally falls out of love with her when he discovers that she is married to Geron. He is finally matched with Bagoa after Cynthia magically returns her to being a woman when Dipsas had changed her into an aspen tree.

TOPICUS

The second son of Discourse, "begotten on" Probability, and the brother of Demonstration and Fallacy in Zouche's The Sophister. Topicus is to be married to Opinion. He is doted on by Discourse and hated by the jealous Fallacy, who contrives to prevent his marriage. He brings Discourse a drink and, when he goes back for a napkin, Fallacy puts poison in Discourse's cup which immediately makes the King mad. Topicus expresses his concerns to Demonstration that "all is not well" with Discourse, and the two sons exit to find their father. Judicium speaks of the love which Invention bears towards Topicus. Proposition informs Definition, Division, and Opposition that Lord Discourse is "falne starke madde" and that "Demonstration, Topicus, and Fallacy, are hot in contention who must governe." Definition and the others go to visit Discourse before "tak[ing] order" with the Lord's sons. Definition presides over the pleadings of Discourse's sons concerning whom should succeed his father, though he wishes that they would all "desist" from their "troublesome contentions." Topicus pleads his case after Demonstration, and makes much of his mastery of "Rhetoricke." He receives Division's vote; however, Definition informs the "yong Lords" that they will have to wait until "some other meanes" are devised to "compose these differences" after the issue remains unresolved. When Fallacy resigns his right to his father's position and claims that one of his brothers can "rule the State" for him if they are able to agree upon whom it should be, Demonstration and Topicus are incited to battle for the succession of the King in the name of courage and honour. Shortly after, Contradiction informs Fallacy that he left them "breathlesse and wounded" and claims that they both "began / To faint with bleeding." Invention is overjoyed to hear from Description that the "best esteemed loving Topicus" has "good hope of recovery." Proposition claims that Analysis "hath well nigh recur'd / the life-despairing brothers, Topicus and Demonstration," and Contradiction and Opposition later confess to thrusting "the worthy Brothers [. . .] into their desperate fury." At the play's end, Discourse claims that he "intend[s] forthwith in joy to celebrate, / Betwixt [his] sonnes and those admired Nymphs [Scientia and Opinion], / On either side long wish't for Nuptialls."

TOPSAIL

One of three young spendthrifts turned sea captains passing time in Plymouth waiting for the wind to change in Davenant's News From Plymouth. The other two are Cable and Seawit. Missing the revelry to which he was accustomed in London, he accompanies Seawit to Carrack's house where he enters into heated competition with Cable in courtship of Lady Loveright. In an effort to garner the favor of Sir Solemn Trifle, he reveals that Carrack's guests have no intention of hearing Trifle debate the relative worthiness of the nine worthies and offers him instead a captive audience of sailors. The next morning, he recounts Trifle's drinking escapades and sings a song about sleeping late. When Loveright arrives at his ship, he asks her to forgive him for quarreling with Cable, and she does so. Topsail then challenges Cable to a duel. Before the duel can take place, Cable reconciles with Topsail. Trifle circulates the news that Loveright will marry Topsail, but when Loveright does not agree to the marriage, Topsail gets revenge by telling Trifle that his credit has been ruined and by making him believe that he faces arrest for spreading false news. As a result, Trifle flees the country. Topsail sails off to war in the hopes that he may yet find a wife.

TORCH BEARER

The Torch Bearer in (?)Heywood's A Warning For Fair Women carries a torch for the second Gentleman that George Sanders meets and provides light for them back to the Sanders' residence. Although Torch Bearer appears in The Characters list, this character is not mentioned as such in the text but rather as "man with a torch" in the stage directions.

TORCHBEARERS

Non-speaking characters in Chapman's The Tragedy of Charles, Duke of Byron. They are part of the Masque of the Virtues in II.

TORCULAR

Brother of Philatell and Sabrina in Suckling's The Goblins. Like his brother, Torcular opposes his sister's marriage to Samorat, hoping to marry her instead to the Prince. At the beginning of the play, he is wounded in a duel by Orsabrin, who is acting as Samorat's second; he is presumed dead, but has in fact been carried off by thieves. In the final scene, Tamoren, the thieves' leader, produces him at the trial of Orsabrin and Samorat, thus proving that both are innocent of his death. Together with Philatell, Torcular now accepts Samorat as his future brother-in-law.

TORMIELLA **1611

Malvento’s sixteen-year-old daughter in Dekker’s Match Me in London. Although her father has promised her to Gazetto, there is not contract, and she secretly marries Cordolente. Discovered there by Bilbo, she agrees to run away from Cordova to Seville to escape her father’s wrath. She is glad to learn that her husband and father have met and reconciled. The king and Dildoman trick her into going with them to sell them some wares. When she refuses him, he lets her go home to think about what good it will do her to yield when next he calls her. She goes to him when he calls, but the jealous queen makes her a lady in her retinue. When the queen threatens to murder her with two knives, she confesses that she has not slept with the king and vows she would rather die than dishonor her husband. The king again woos her, and she resists him. Cordolente goes to Tormiella disguised as her shoemaker and they plot to escape together at an apt opportunity. The king hears that she has gone mad, but he determines to marry her anyway. Gazetto tricks her into betraying her plan to run away with Cordolento and, under his power, makes her swear to marry and murder the king. In a dumb show, the wedding is halted by thunder and lightning. Tormiella tells the king that Gazetto swore her to murder him in his wedding sheets. At play’s end, she is reunited with Cordolente by a repentant king. She forgives Gazetto.

TORRAFUCO **1636

A “ghost character" in Killigrew’s The Princess. He keeps the captive women and children for the lieutenant and Terresius until they are sent to market.

TORRENTI

Signior Torrenti is the prodigal nephew of Lord Nicolleto Vanni in Dekker's Wonder of A Kingdom. From his first appearance, he distinguishes himself as a self-indulging, narcissistic and contemptible person. He and Iacomo Gentili are polar opposites of vice and virtue. He mocks Iacomo's generosity and wishes him to die a beggar for his assumed greatness. When his brother, who had been captured by Turks and enslaved on one of their galleys, returns to ask for help, Torrenti pretends not to know him and refuses help. Not only does he deny his own brother food, clothes and shelter, he mocks him in his helplessness. When Torrenti has a guarded table covered with dishes carried in front of his brother, the latter snatches one of the pistols and shoots it into the air, cursing Torrenti, then exits the stage. Soon after, Mutio and Philippo arrive at Torrenti's home and praise him for his "hospitable princely house-keeping." They invite themselves in the name of the Duke, and Torrenti receives them as his guests and immediately boasts with his wealth. The beginning of Act 4 shows a generous and self-satisfied Torrenti giving away jewels and ropes to the Duke of Florence, and a gold chain to each courtier. Nicoletto Vanni, Torrenti's uncle, reproves his nephew for his extravagant lifestyle and predicts that he will bankrupt himself. The indignant Torrenti only dismisses his uncle's warning and leaves. However, in the final scene, Vanni is proven right, when Torrenti enters as a beggar.

TORTURER**1604

In Verney’s Antipoe, he discusses Macros’ torture with the Captain of the Watch.

TORTURERS**1604

In Verney’s Antipoe, they accompany Dramurgon to execute the imprisoned Antipoe but end by hanging up the Jailor, Jailor’s wife and servants when Antipoe is found to have escaped.

TOSSE, TOM

Tom Tosse, also known as Tomkin, is a friend of Dicke Dicer in the anonymous The Contention Between Liberalitie and Prodigalitie. He is going to accompany Dicer in his search for Prodigalitie. When they finally find him in the company of Money, they pretend not to be seeking the latter, but just their company. Then they mislead him into wasting Money, until this finally deserts the former. Tom will later inform Prodigalitie that money has gone with Tenacity into a far-away country, he is also an accomplice in his murder, but, he and his friend flee at the end, leaving Prodigality alone, to be charged with the crimes.

TOTA

Queen Tota is wife to Mullisheg, the King of Morocco and Fez in Thomas Heywood's The Fair Maid of the West, Part Two. Disturbed by her husband's obvious infatuation with Bess, she decides to even the score by having an affair with Spencer. She thinks she has coerced Roughman to arrange a tryst, but matters take a new course when Roughman tells Goodlack about the planned liaison. Goodlack, having been similarly approached by Mullisheg to arrange an affair with Bess, hits upon the "bed trick" that will bring the royal couple together while the English visitors make their escape.

TOTTIPATE, SIR **1641

In (?)Shipman’s Grobiana’s Nuptials, this is Grobianus’s cant term for audience members who applaud doggerel rhymes.

TOTTLE, SIR HARRY

A "ghost character" in Hawkins's Apollo Shroving. Complement quotes his "fellow Knight and Philosopher" Sir Harry Tottle when he states that "anger is the whetstone of fortitude."

TOUCHBOX

A ragged soldier (may be the same character as the Corporal) in Heywood's Royal King. With Match, he tries to return to the Captain when he becomes rich, but the Captain fobs them off with some spare change.

TOUCHSTONE

A jester in Duke Frederick's court in Shakespeare's As You Like It. He is a witty clown; a verbal comic typical of the parts written for the comedian Robert Armin after Will Kempe left the Chamberlain's Men. When Celia decides to accompany the banished Rosalind to the forest of Arden, she persuades her father's jester, Touchstone, to join them. He mocks Jaques in a manner that causes that melancholic gentleman to admire the motley fool. He wittily derides the doggerel verse Orlando pins to the trees. As a lover of Audrey, he is far more interested in copulation than commitment. He arranges a secret marriage in the woods (one he might later deny), but the wedding party of Touchstone, Audrey, and Sir Oliver Martext is interrupted when Jaques enters and tells them to marry in church. Among the four marriages that close the play is Touchstone's union with Audrey.

TOUCHSTONE, WILLIAM

William Touchstone is a successful goldsmith at Goldsmith's Row, and father to Gertrude and Mildred in Jonson, Marston, and Chapman's Eastward Ho!. His tag line is "work upon that now." When Sir Petronel arrives, Touchstone informs him that his daughter's dowry consists of land inherited from her grandmother and nothing else. Touchstone gives Mildred's hand in marriage to Golding, convinced that the honest couple would do better than the ambitious noble pair. Touchstone offers to give Mildred a good dowry and pay for the wedding expenses. Just before Gertrude's departure for Sir Petronel's fictional eastward castle, Touchstone brings Mildred and Golding to say good-bye. Seeing that Gertrude and Mistress Touchstone treat Golding with contempt, ashamed of being related to an apprentice, Touchstone exits with the couple. Touchstone is aware of Sir Petronel's plot of deserting Gertrude and sailing to Virginia, but he predicts they will not reach far in this storm. As for Gertrude and his wife, Touchstone reports they have returned disillusioned. When Golding reports that Sir Petronel and his party have been cast ashore at Greenwich and the Constable has arrested them, Touchstone sees these events as divine justice. Touchstone tells Golding to commit the two rascals to prison, and he concludes with a moralizing comment. As regards Security, Touchstone says he will go to the Lord Mayor to get a warrant and confiscate the usurer's assets for the crown. When Wolf brings Touchstone two letters from Quicksilver and Sir Petronel, in which they ask for forgiveness, Touchstone is unimpressed with reports of their good behavior. Moreover, Touchstone will not hear any of Mildred's pleas for mercy. However, when Wolf reports that Golding has been arrested, Touchstone rushes to prison to bail his favorite son-in-law. In prison, Quicksilver sings a heart-breaking song about his transgression and how he wishes his master would come and rescue him. Touchstone is impressed and forgives him and the repentant Sir Petronel. In the reconciliation scene, Touchstone has a final moralizing speech. He refers to the reformation of the thrifty son, the punishment of the usurer, and the return of the prodigal child.

TOUCHSTONE, MISTRESS

Mistress Touchstone is wife to Touchstone and mother of Gertrude and Mildred in Jonson, Marston, and Chapman's Eastward Ho!. She has high ambitions for her daughter because she thinks her husband would not have the privilege of nobility because he was a fool. Mistress Touchstone is so eager to have Gertrude married into nobility that she offers to pay for the wedding ceremony. After the wedding, Mistress Touchstone and Gertrude are impatient to leave for Sir Petronel's fictional eastward castle. When Touchstone enters with Mildred and Golding, announcing that they are married with his consent, Mistress Touchstone shows contempt at having an apprentice as a son-in-law. Mistress Touchstone and Gertrude leave for the airy castle in the country. Eventually, Touchstone reports that the two women, having realized there is no castle at the end of their journey have returned to London by the Weeping Cross. Mistress Touchstone advises Gertrude to ask forgiveness of her father, but the daughter is scornful. Touchstone forgives his foolish wife, who has been his cross for thirty years, and Mistress Touchstone remains with her husband at his house. Mistress Touchstone visits the still disdainful Gertrude at the poor alehouse where she is lodged, advising her to go to Mildred and ask for help. At Touchstone's house, Mistress Touchstone and Mildred plead in vain for Gertrude's pardon, but the goldsmith will not relent. In the final reconciliation scene in prison, Mistress Touchstone is present when Touchstone forgives his errant daughter.

TOUCHWOOD

Family name of Samson and Samuel in Brome's The Sparagus Garden.

TOUCHWOOD, ELDER

A "ghost character" in Middleton's A Chaste Maid in Cheapside. Touchwood Senior tells the country wench that he is a poor younger brother. As Touchwood Junior is his younger brother, this allusion is to yet a third and elder Touchwood brother who does not appear in the play.

TOUCHWOOD, JUNIOR

Younger brother of Touchwood, Sr. and in love with Moll against her father's wishes in Middleton's A Chaste Maid in Cheapside. He comes to her father, Yellowhammer, to have a wedding ring made for his intended—careful not to tell Yellowhammer that Moll is his intended. His several attempts to elope with Moll are foiled by Yellowhammer or Whorehound. He fights a duel with Whorehound in which both men are wounded. Pretending to be dead, he and Moll are at last brought in lying in their coffins. The mourners agree that they should have allowed them to marry. Upon hearing this, the two rise from their coffins and marry.

TOUCHWOOD, SENIOR

Touchwood, Jr.'s elder brother in Middleton's A Chaste Maid in Cheapside. He must leave his happy home and live away from his wife. He is too virile and too poor, and he cannot afford to breed more children. Neither can he restrain himself from bedding his wife. He is prepotent so that each of his copulations produces get. A good-hearted fellow, he helps his younger brother in his unsuccessful attempts to elope with Moll. He gives Kix a "medicinal water" that is supposed to make him potent. To make the elixir seem to work, Touchwood, Sr. secretly gets Mrs. Kix with child and so helps disinherit Whorehound. Kix is overjoyed at his wife's pregnancy and gives Touchwood, Sr. a hundred marks, thus allowing him to move back in with his wife. Touchwood,Sr. also presides over the supposed funeral of Touchwood, Jr. and Moll, and seeing that there are no enemies to their union, has them rise from their coffins and marry.

TOURES, SIR ROBERT

Sir Robert Toures is a gentleman, son of the Auditor in Armin's The Two Maids of More–Clacke. He wants to find the Lady's glove when she loses it. Later, he proposes to Mary although he has always thought that he was to be single. He is offered Mary by her father with a strange promise. He disguises himself as a Tinker boy to sing in front of the Lady. When he finishes, he is left with Mary and he discovers himself and tells his lover to go with him. Later, in the final wedding party, he is blamed for the death of his lover.

TOWERSON

Towerson is a merchant at the Exchange in Haughton's Englishmen for My Money. He brings news to Pisaro that their ships laden with riches have arrived safely at Plymouth. He also brings with him a Bill of Exchange for £200 for Pisaro to pay. Pisaro is suspicious and wonders if his factor's signature has been counterfeited, an accusation Towerson denies, supporting his claim with a letter from Pisaro's factor abroad. News arrives that some of Pisaro's ships have been taken by Spanish galleys. Pisaro launches an angry tirade at Towerson when he again asks for his £200. News next arrives that the ships have not been lost after all, and when Towerson duns Pisaro again, Pisaro, now happy, agrees to pay his bill.

TOWN CLARK **1641

A “ghost character" in (?)Shipman’s Grobiana’s Nuptials. A Grobian. He is on the list of invitees Oyestus is sent to cry into the Grobian feast.

TOWN CRIER

See also CRIER.

TOWN CRIER

Crier for the city of Julio in Whetstone's 2 Promos and Cassandra. He gains attention for the King's officer, who reads the royal proclamation regarding corrupt officials.

TOWNSMAN

The Townsman is the spokesperson for the people of Wakefield in Greene's George a Greene. He tells the Justice that they all agree with him that they should not aid the rebels.

TOWNSMAN, FIRST and OTHERS

Several townsmen appear in Fletcher's Love's Pilgrimage.
  • The First Townsman answers the Governor, when he asks why they did not call him earlier, that they were all so busy fighting that they forgot.
  • An unspecified number of Townsmen all agree with the First Townsman that they do not know the cause of the fight.

TOWNSMEN, FIRST, SECOND, THIRD, and FOURTH**1621

When Ruy Dias rescues Armusia in Fletcher's The Island Princess, he attacks the town of Sidore with cannon thereby drawing the townsmen out.
  1. Townsmen One complains of the strength of the canon's barrage and asks what can be done.
  2. Townsmen Two describes the damage being done to their town and suggests that they should do whatever it takes to "appease this thunder."
  3. Townsman Three suggests that they go to the king and deliver up the prisoner in order to stop the Portugese from bombarding their town.
  4. Townsman Four asks if the attackers of their village are Portuguese.

TOWNSPEOPLE **1599

Mute characters in Ruggle’s Club Law. They appear in the fight to fill the numbers during the brawl between the town and students. The text suggests there are more of them than there are students.

TOXEUS**1611

Brother to Althea in Heywood's Brazen Age. He assists Meleager in the hunt for the Caledonian Boar. Meleager kills Toxeus in an argument over whether Atlanta should be given credit for the boar's slaying.

TOZ **1632

Only mentioned in Randolph's Jealous Lovers. Demetrius, disguised as an astrologer, rattles off a list of "the learned Cabalists and all the Chaldees." The list includes Asla, Baruch, Abohali, Caucaph, Toz, Arcaphan, Albuas, Gasar, Hali, Hippocras, Lencuo, Ben, Benesaphan, and Albubetes.

TRACHINUS

Trachinus is a courtier at Syracruse in Lyly's Sapho and Phao. He introduces the scholar Pandion to life at court.

TRACY, LITTLE

A mute character in (?Chettle and) Munday's Downfall of Robert Earl of Huntington. Little Tracy is one of the actors in the frame story, a boy who is to play Marian. He is reprimanded by Skelton for leaping about like a boy when he should be acting like a lady. (See also "MIRIAN").

TRADESMAN **1637

A “ghost character" in Mayne’s City Match. Newcut jokes that the Temple considered hiring such a fellow as Frank Plotwell has become to be an apostate in their antimasque.

TRADEWELL

Family name of Old and Young Tradewell in Massinger's The City Madam.

TRAFFORD, SIR EDMUND

Only mentioned by the Miller and King William in [?]Wilson's Fair Em, the Miller's Daughter. A Saxon nobleman who disguised himself as a peasant after the invasion of William the Conqueror. The Miller is in the same situation.

TRAGAEDUS **1607

Part of Auditus’ retinue in Tomkis’ Lingua. Twin of Comedus. He wears black velvet, fair buskins, and a fauchion.

TRAGEDIA **1635

In the introduction to Killigrew’s The Conspiracy, she scorns comedy as fit for a nuptial and convinces Juno that a tragedy is nobler and better able to bless the viewer.

TRAGEDY

I.
Tragedie has the first dialogue in the Induction to (?)Heywood's A Warning For Fair Women and the last word of the Epilogue, dominating both. Tragedie also is the only speaker in the three Dumb Shows. Using her whip and critical remarks, Tragedie banishes both Hystorie and Comedie from the stage for the day. In Dumb Show I Tragedie enters with a "bowle of Bloud," calls her "dreadful Furies forth," and describes in detail the murderous, lustful, and adulterous behavior that George Brown, Anne Sanders, Anne Drewry, and Roger are concurrently miming on stage. In Dumb Show II Tragedie uses symbols to describe Browne's murder of George Sanders, and in Dumb Show III she foretells the trials and executions, "Measure for measure, and lost bloud for bloud." In her concluding dialogue Tragedie reminds that audience that the story is true and that anything the play lacked would on the morrow be "Perform'd by Hystorie or Comedie."
II.
She argues with her sister Comedy over which of them is superior in Randolph's Muses' Looking Glass. She claims that her ability to move men through fear has a greater effect than Comedy's to move men through laughter.

TRAINS

Merecraft's serving-man in Jonson's The Devil is an Ass.

TRAINWELL, MISTRESS

Mistress Trainwell is a gentlewoman and governess to Constance, on whose behalf she approaches Sir Philip Luckless, begging him to give up his marriage with Mistress Fitchow in Brome's The Northern Lass. Thinking that she speaks for Constance Holdup, Sir Philip mistakes her for a bawd, a mistake Anvil later repeats. She joins with Constance, Tridewell and Anvil in appearing as Masquers at Sir Philip's wedding. Constance's uncle, Sir Paul Squelch, is unenthused when Trainwell suggests that he make up for Constance's subsequent madness by marrying herself; undeterred, she plots to snare him. After helping Sir Philip to escape with Constance, Trainwell pretends to Sir Paul that her pupil has actually eloped with Master Widgine. While he is distracted by this, she organizes the dinner party he had earlier ordered, convinces him to disguise himself as a Spaniard, and helps him out of the mess that ensues on the condition that he consent to marry her—which he does.

TRAJAN

I.
Only mentioned in Jonson's The New Inn. When Prudence exercises her authority as the supreme judge in the court of love over Lady Frampul, commanding her mistress to kiss Lovel, Host admires her bravery and calls her a she-Traian. Trajan was a Roman emperor between 98-117AD. He was born in Spain and conquered Dacia, Armenia, and Parthia.
II.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Pathomachia. Pride boasts of how he aided him.

TRAMPLER, AMBODEXTER

A lawyer in Brome's The Sparagus Garden, employed by Striker but a friend to Samuel, who tries to convince Touchwood to allow Samuel to marry Annabel on the grounds that she is worth six thousand pounds on her marriage. She will also receive two thousand more on the birth of her first lawfully begotten child, and much more money at Striker's death. Touchwood rejects him as a knave, but is convinced by his proposals.

TRANEO

A "ghost character" in the anonymous Timon of Athens, former lover of Blatt, rejected by Blatt because his beard was red. (II.1)

TRANIO

I.
Along with Biondello, one of Lucentio's servants in Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew. Tranio arrives in Padua with his master, who is on his way to attend university. When Lucentio falls in love with Bianca and overhears that she shall not be married before her elder sister Katherine, he has Tranio assume his identity to publicly press his suit with Baptista, Bianca's father. Meanwhile, Lucentio disguises himself as a tutor named Cambio in order to woo Bianca secretly and in person. Tranio relishes his role as Lucentio, and when Baptista refuses to seal the marriage bond between him and Bianca without first meeting Lucentio's father, Vincentio, Tranio tricks a Mantuan Pedant into impersonating him.
II.
Tranio, one of Petruchio's close friends in Fletcher's The Woman's Prize, is a voice of reason in deflating Petronius' wrathful rages against his daughters and in leading pigheaded Rowland into admitting his passion for Livia and marrying her. By wagering with Rowland that he loved Livia, he set a trap to reconcile the couple to each other, and he conspired with Biancha to trick Petronious and Moroso into consenting to the marriage.

TRANSFORMATION TRINCALO **1615

An imaginary character in Tomkis’ Albumazar. Trincalo imagines naming his and Armellina’s first born Transformation Trincalo because he will be got after Trincalo transforms himself (through Pandolfo’s magic) into Antonio. Later, Trincalo imagines getting a Knight’s daughter for the boy’s bride and buying him a pedigree from a Welsh herald.

TRANSLATOR **1627

Appears in the Introduction of Randolph's Plutophthalmia. He tells Aristophanes that in London "three-quarters of the city are Roundheads" who hate all languages but English–"'tis a dangerous touchy age." He helps Aristophanes conjure away Cleon's ghost. He then presents the prologue to the play. He says that the poet is worried about the audience's high expectations of him and wishes the play had "been done / In some old rotten barn at Islington."

TRAPDOOR, RALPH

A scoundrel that Sir Alexander Wengrave hires to entrap Moll Cutpurse in Middleton and Dekker's Moll Cutpurse, The Roaring Girl. Trapdoor has Moll hire him as her servant so that he may spy on her for Sir Alexander. Trapdoor informs him that Moll will be meeting with Sebastian Wengrave in Sir Alexander's chamber, and Sir Alexander lays out valuables to tempt Moll into stealing them. After Moll becomes aware of Trapdoor's duplicity, she fires him, and she later encounters both him and Tearcat in the street disguised as poor soldiers. Trapdoor and Tearcat cant with her (i.e. speak criminal street slang), while she translates and explains it to Jack Dapper, Sir Thomas Long, Sir Beauteous Ganymede, and Lord Noland, giving them (and the audience) an education in purse cutting.

TRAPPOLA

Trappola is a friend of Biondello, Amedeus' servant in (?)Jeffere's The Bugbears. He is recruited by the former to impersonate Nostradamus, the famous French astrologer, as an expert in exorcising spirits and curing disease. Trappola convinces the skeptical Amedeus that his house is haunted by bloodthirsty spirits, the dotard Cantalupo that he should not marry the young Rosimunda, and the elderly Brancatius that his daughter is cured of her mysterious illness (pregnancy).

TRAPPOLIN

In love with Flametta in Cokain's Trappolin. Trappolin begins the play delighted with his faithful sweetheart and happy with his identity, despite his rather low condition. He incurs the wrath of Barbarino by flauting the nobleman's authority and flaunting Flametta's fidelity to the desirous Barbarino. When Barbarino becomes one of the ruling Lords of Florence, he has Trappolin arrested, revealing that Trappolin is a pimp and a pander. Trappolin is banished from Florence on pain of death for corrupting Florence's youth. He complains to his friend Brunetto (Horatio), who gives him a ring to help him on his way, and admonishes him to lead an honest life. Casting about for a means of survival in his banishment, Trappolin encounters Mago, who knows his whole story and offers to help him. Trappolin is transformed into the image of Lavinio, Duke of Tuscany, through Mago's conjuration. Mago also gives him a magic powder that will cause whomever it touches to be mistaken for Trappolin, instructing him to use it on the true Duke Lavinio. Trappolin is warned not to remove any part of his disguise or his actual identity will instantly be revealed. Just as Brunetto (Horatio) is being arrested by Barbarino for wooing Prudentia, Trappolin returns to Florence magically disguised as Lavinio, the Duke. He chastises Barbarino and Machavil for banishing Trappolin on the minor charge of pandering, claiming to have returned unexpectedly without his new wife and train in order to see how they have functioned as governors. To humiliate them, he rides on the back of Barbarino, and commands Mattemores to run at his side in place of his lackey. Alone, Trappolin marvels at his new-found power. He discovers Horatio in prison and calls for Pucannello, the jailor, to bring him forth. He returns Horatio's signs of respect equally, refusing the honors and titles appropriate to his role as Duke, amazing the unfortunate prisoner. Grateful for Horatio's gift of the ring when he was banished, he insists that they speak and act as equals, and listens as Horatio explains how he came to be imprisoned. Upon Horatio's confession of love for Prudentia, Trappolin offers his approval and blessing for the match, and instructs Horatio to marry her, if that is her wish. His only present regret is that even if he should successfully woo Flametta, he could not bed her without revealing himself, for that would mean removing his magical garments. Flametta discovers him alone and pleads for the repeal of Trappolin's banishment. Trappolin tests her by asking for her maidenhead in recompense for the repeal, and she refuses. He continues to test her, and she respectfully adheres to her virtue. He does claim a number of kisses, and refuses to give her a final answer in response to her suit. Having sent for Prudentia, Trappolin grants his blessing on the love between her and Horatio, as long as Prudentia is willing. She reveals Horatio's true identity and gratefully confesses her love. Trappolin bids her marry Horatio at her will. He releases Horatio and clothes him richly, causing the nobles of the court to wonder at his folly. He has Barbarino and Machavil arrested and imprisoned for speaking out against Horatio. Trappolin grants Prudentia to Horatio, who confesses his unworthiness, but his benefactor will not be swayed, and insists Horatio deserves such a wife. Horatio, like the nobles of the Florentine court, believes him mad. Continuing to act as Duke, Trappolin hears a series of suits, brought by Calfshead, Barne, and Mrs. Fine, and makes judgments in each case that amaze his attendants. He promises Flametta to repeal Trappolin's banishment, on the condition that she will lie with her lover upon his oath to marry her. She reluctantly agrees, preferring to wed before consummating the marriage. Upon learning that the true Duke Lavinio has returned, Trappolin determines to try out the magic powder on him, in order to transform the Duke into the image of Trappolin. The Duke responds negatively to the betrothal of Prudentia and Horatio, and returns Horatio to prison. When the disguised Trappolin encounters Prudentia, he apologizes for his drunken action against Horatio. He orders the increasingly confused jailor to release Horatio again, asks the lovers' forgiveness, and sends them off together. These alternations between Trappolin's will and that of the true Duke continue, as Trappolin seeks an opportunity to transform the Duke. The opportunity presents itself at last, and the Duke is transformed, although he retains knowledge of his true identity. Flametta enters and mistakes him for her Trappolin. The Duke rejects her. When Mattemores enters, the Duke inquires about his Lords, and Mattemores rebuffs him, believing him to be Trappolin. The disguised Trappolin enters and orders the release of Horatio, who is once again under arrest, infuriating the true Duke. Yet, he must be patient as long as he appears to be the lowly Trappolin, and so looks on as the imposter sends his sister and Horatio off to be wed. Finally, Trappolin orders the imprisonment of Lavinio, and Pucannello complies. All are convinced that Lavinio is Trappolin. Trappolin confesses that he begins to grow weary of the game of disguise. Flametta pleads with him to release the transformed Lavinio, whom she believes to be her lover, and Trappolin complies. Horatio and Prudentia enter, married, and Trappolin expresses his approval. When Mago enters shortly thereafter and reveals the real identity of Lavinio, the Duke promises to forgive everything in exchange for his transformation beck to himself. Trappolin, exposed by Mago, fears he will be punished, but Lavinio has forgiven all transgressions, so he is safe. He reclaims Flametta, and Horatio, grateful for the kindness shown to him by Trappolin, bestows an earldom on him, greatly improving the status and condition of both Trappolin and Flametta. At the very end, Mago the conjurer reveals that he actually is Trappolin's father.

TRASH

Trash is the Clown, and a servant to Valentine in Chamberlain's Swaggering Damsel. As his master, he is in love, but in this case with Valentine´s lady's maid, Betty. Thus, when in Act Three, his master says that he does not want to see Sabina again, he saddens because that means that he will not see Betty either. Later, in Act Five, his presence is summoned by his master so he has to pack all his possessions and meet him. But, he has to leave them as they have been confiscated. With his master's wedding, Trash goes to serve Sir Timothy who appoints him Steward of his house for his discretion, judgement, wit and police.

TRASH, JOAN

Joan Trash is a gingerbread woman in Jonson's Bartholomew Fair. In the morning, while people at the Fair begin to erect their booths and stalls, Trash argues with Leatherhead about the location. Leatherhead tells her not to settle too close to him, threatening her to disclose that her gingerbread is made of stale bread and honey. Trash does not relent and claims that she has paid for her ground, so she is entitled to sell her wares. Leatherhead threatens to report her to Justice Overdo, but Trash is not intimidated. Trash is on hand when Knockem provokes a fight in order to distract Quarlous and Winwife's attention and have Edgworth rob them. When Ursula is hurt in the fight, Trash goes to fetch some cream for the burn. Later, Trash, Leatherhead, and others sit at their booths and stalls, when Whit, Haggis, and Bristle enter. When Bristle wants to know the time, Leatherhead answers with contempt, while Trash responds ironically. When the Cokes party enter, Cokes wants to buy everything on offer, including Trash's entire gingerbread basket. Angered at Leatherhead's competition, Trash alludes to his other impersonation as a puppeteer. Cokes decides to buy Leatherhead's entire shop, whose contents shall furnish the masque at the puppet-show, and Trash's gingerbread basket, which shall provide the banquet. Trash says her basket costs four shillings and eleven pence, ground and all, and the foolish Cokes gives her five shillings more. Trash is again present when Cokes is being duped. Afterwards, she packs up her wares and leaves with Leatherhead.

TRASHARD

Family name of Mister Oliver, Abraham, Margaret, and Gillian in ?Brewer's The Country Girl.

TRAVELER **1561

The Traveler in the anonymous Pedler's Prophecy enters hoping his next voyage will be better than his last and meets the Mariner and then the Artificer, who tells them both about the Pedler and his rebuke of the Mother's secret Catholicism. When the Pedler enters, he immediately attacks the Traveler, claiming he is actually a merchant, and they argue both about the Traveler's purpose and the Pedler's ability to prophecy. The Traveler is extremely skeptical of what the Pedler says, but does agree to buy from the Pedler, asking him to meet him at the sign of the Doe (presumably an inn) for further discussion.

TRAVELER **1613

The Traveller, the Captain,, the Poet and the Tobacco Man are hangers-on to Young Loveless in Beaumont and Fletcher's Scornful Lady. They urge him to spend his money on drink and women, and are retained by him even after his marriage to the Widow. The Poet and the Captain are extremely loquacious, but the Traveller says little and the Tobacco-Man nothing at all.

TRAVELER **1629

A disguise assumed by the Duke in Carlell's The Deserving Favorite. After he is thought slain in the duel with Lysander, the Duke returns disguised as a visitor. He discovers a "boy" tied to a tree and releases "him." They try to find Gerard's lodge but are lost and come instead to Orsinio's home. The "traveler" and "boy" are given a single bed to sleep in. Next morning, the "boy" reveals that "he" is actually Clarinda in disguise. The "traveler" affirms her accusation that Jacomo attempted to rape her and then tied her to a tree. When Lysander is at the point of execution, the Duke throws off his disguise to reveal that he is still alive and so saves Lysander.

TRAVELER, ENGLISH

The English Traveler is a fool hired by the Queen of France to testify against Floramell in return for payment in Smith's The Hector of Germany. The English Traveler is hired with a French traveler. While they wait for the Queen to give them their assignment, the two men exchange bawdy stereotypical jokes involving the sexual habits of a variety of nationalities. When the Queen pays the travelers, they immediately go and spend all of their money on alcohol. They are both blind drunk when they are called to testify against Floramell and their presence is useless to the Queen. The two travelers are ejected from the court unceremoniously.

TRAVELER, FRENCH

The French Traveler is a fool hired by the Queen of France to testify against Floramell in return for payment in Smith's The Hector of Germany. The French traveler is hired with an English traveler. While they wait for the Queen to give them their assignment, the two men exchange bawdy stereotypical jokes involving the sexual habits of a variety of nationalities. When the Queen pays the travelers, they immediately go and spend all of their money on alcohol. They are both blind drunk when they are called to testify against Floramell and their presence is useless to the Queen. The two travelers are ejected from the court unceremoniously.

TRAVERS

Travers is a servant of Henry Percy, Earl of Northumberland in Shakespeare's 2 Henry IV. He brings to Northumberland the true, tragic news about the Shrewsbury loss and the death of Hotspur.

TRAVERS, MARMADUKE

Like fellow suitor Lamount in Shirley's The Ball, Sir Marmaduke Travers is made foolish by the tricks of Lady Lucina and sets off to court anew. Again like fellow Lamount, Travers is fooled by the joking and trickery of Rosamond and Honoria.

TREACHERY

I.
A "ghost character" in Wilson's The Three Ladies of London. A guest at the wedding of Dissimulation and Love.
II.
Probably a different character is meant than in The Three Ladies of London, but Treachery is the page of Ambition in Wilson's The Three Lords and Three Ladies of London. He calls himself 'Action.' He carries a lance with a pendant of "argent and azure, an armed arm catching at the sunbeams." The Spanish pages (Terror, Shame, and Treachery) fight the pages of London (Wit, Wealth, and Will) and are defeated.

TREADWAY

Friend and companion to Raphael in Heywood's The Captives. Questions Raphael's plan to rescue his mistress from Mildew's brothel, fearing she has been contaminated by her exposure to vice. Joins Raphael and the Clown in the search for Mildew after he fails to keep his appointment with them; he is then sent by Raphael to search the city for Mildew. Later, Raphael and Treadway are brought by the Clown to the village where Mildew and Sarleboys with the two women captives are confronting John Ashburne, Godfrey, and the assembled villagers. As Raphael vents his fury against Mildew, Treadway counsels him to pursue legal action rather than direct revenge. Treadway begins to fall in love with Scribonia as he continues to counsel legal action against Mildew and Sarleboys. Later, the Clown returns with Raphael and Treadway, confirming the discovery of Palestra's true identity as Mirabel and that John Ashburne will consent to Raphael's marriage to Palestra/Mirabel. Treadway also asks Raphael to speak to Scribonia about his love for her. Treadway joins Raphael as he is reunited with Mirabel, and reminds Raphael of his promise. John Ashburne allows Treadway to woo and marry Scribonia if she will accept him, which she does. Treadway agrees to go to London with Scribonia/Winifred and the others. The departure of the Ashburne brothers, Raphael, Mirabel, Treadway, and Winifred is delayed, however, by the resolution of Friar John's murder amongst the Sherrif, the Abbot, Friar Richard, the Duke of Averne and Dennis.

TREASON

A priest in Bale's King Johan, Part 2 who has been condemned to be hanged. King Johan, unwillingly, gives him to Cardynall Pandulphus who sets him free.

TREASURER **1594

A non-speaking character in the anonymous Knack To Know An Honest Man. Treasurer of the court of Venice. The Duke announces that the treasurer of the court will pay Servio later for capturing Lelio.

TREASURER **1622

Witnesses the reconciliation of Chabot and Montmorency in the opening scene of Chapman's The Tragedy of Chabot, Admiral of France. After Chabot and the King leave, however, he (along with the Secretary and Chancellor) urges Montmorency to do whatever he can to displace Chabot in the King's favor. He is present at Chabot's trial, and expresses his dismay at the judges' initial recalcitrance to find the admiral guilty of high treason. He goes, with the Secretary, to see the King after the Chancellor has told him of the verdict. Despite his own involvement in the plotting against Chabot, he escapes any consequences.

TREATWELL

He is the man of young Lord Skales in Davenport's New Trick to Cheat the Devil. He delivers Master Changeable a message, on behalf of his Lord, with the news that Lord Skales wishes to marry Master Changeable's daughter. After some discussion among father, mother and daughter, he receives a positive answer from the girl. Later, when he listens to Roger's arguments not to serve Lord Skales, he concludes the boy is a faithful servant to his former master and an honest man. Then he takes part in a fight supporting his master and Geffrey against Master Slightall and Roger, and the former are beaten up by the latter. Finally, he is responsible for going to seek Fryer Bernard, since he is needed to exorcise the evil spirit haunting the chamber at the Changeables'. But he returns with the bad news that the friar refused to come because he does not believe the chamber is haunted.

TREBASCO

Trebasco is Sir Amphilus's footman in Brome's The Damoiselle. He tells his master that he does not need to worry any more because he is not to marry Alice. He has been told that Alice has died. Later, he informs his master about the loss of his dog.

TREBASSUS

One of the Shah's noble attendants in the anonymous Tamar Cam. He, along with Otanes and Artaxes behead the three rebels off stage.

TREBATIO

Like Alisandra in Dekker's Wonder of A Kingdom, Lord Vanni's son Trebatio only appears briefly at the play's beginning, and again in Act IV. Early on, Alphonsina confesses she has fallen in love with Trebantio and wants to marry him. Trebatio's most important plot function is his part in his mother's plan to mock her husband's pursuit of Alphonsina. Trebantio intrudes upon the attempted seduction, playing a lute. He pretends to woo Alphonsina, who seems to refuses his advances, and thus reinforces Lord Vanni's belief that she is in love with him. Dariene finally ends the charade, informing her husband that Trebatio has won Alphonsina's heart, and the play concludes with marriage.

TREBATIUS

Trebatius is a lawyer in Rome and an adviser to Horace in Jonson's Poetaster. He is a mute character in the play, but has a part in a dialogue with Horace in the Author's apology, quoted from Horace's Satire i, Book 2. When Tucca sees Trebatius in Horace's company on the Via Sacra, the braggart avoids him because he fears the lawyer's sagacity. Trebatius appears at the end of the play, in the author's apology, which is set in lieu of epilogue. Horace asks advice from Trebatius regarding his satires, which caricature the men of power in his time. Trebatius tells Horace to stop writing them, while Horace finds this radical measure an unfair muzzling of his muse. Trebatius says that it is better for Horace to stop writing incisive satires and thus have a quiet night's sleep. According to Trebatius, if Horace wants to write something, he should turn to composing odes praising Caesar's victories or his virtues in time of peace. Trebatius fears that, because of Horace's audacity in exposing vice in his satires, some great man's friend should be his death. The lawyer bids Horace to obey the laws, concluding that laughter is what makes satire bearable, because shame and reproach are quickly dissolved in laughter.

TREBATZI, GASPARO

I.
This is the given name of the Duke of Milan in Dekker and Middleton's 1 Honest Whore. It is unused in the body of the play and given only in the first two entrances of the Duke.
II.
Trebazzi is the father of Infelice, Hippolito's wife, and is the Duke of Milan in Dekker's 2 Honest Whore. When Orlando (disguised as the servant Pacheco) visits him for aid in bringing about a reformation of Matheo, he sees through the disguise and agrees to help. He arranges for Matheo to be arrested and imprisoned for a robbery Orlando has staged, in order to frighten the swaggerer into better behavior. Further, Gasparo, who has learned of Hippolito's pursuit of Bellafront, issues an order that all prostitutes are to be arrested, in the hope that his wayward son-in-law will cease his attempts to have Bellafront return to her former profession.

TREBLE, TIM

Tym Treble is the joking name the Foole assigns to Stremon's Boy in Fletcher's The Mad Lover.

TREBONIUS **1595

Trebonius laments the death of Pompey in the anonymous Caesar and Pompey and supports Brutus and Cassius.

TREBONIUS **1599

Trebonius is part of the conspiracy against Julius Caesar in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. His specific assignment is to draw Mark Antony away from Caesar just prior to the attack.

TREBUTIO

A gentleman and a friend of Aramant in Wilson's The Inconstant Lady. Trebutio joins with Antonio to introduce the play and several characters, discuss the nature of women, be there to support Aramant, and generally provide a connective narrative throughout the play.

TREDVARGES, TIMOTHY

A "ghost character" in Mountfort's The Launching of The Mary. One of the workers in the shipyard. His name is called out by the Clerk of the Check.

TREE

In the masque of beasts (IV.i of Fletcher's The Mad Lover), Stremon's Boy takes the role of the Tree. In the casting scene (3.5), Stremon had referred to this part as that of a Bush, but the lyrics of the song in IV.i indicate that Stremon's Boy impersonates a Tree in the performance.

TREEDLE, SIR NICHOLAS

Treedle is the knight to whom Sir Richley has pledged his daughter Violetta in Shirley's The Witty Fair One. A foolish man who keeps a Tutor for learning travel by book, Treedle has seldom seen his bride-to-be and is easily duped into wedding Sensible, a chambermaid disguised in her mistress' garb. Rather than lose face and admit his mistake, Treedle takes Brains' advice and claims to have wed Sensible on purpose.

TRELCATIO

A Genoese citizen, father of Amoretta in Ford's The Lady's Trial. He supports the plot of Piero and Futelli to arrange two absurd courtships for her in order to reduce her unreasonable expectations. He accepts with good grace the final outcome: that she decides to marry Futelli himself.

TREMELIO

The King of Aragon rewards Tremelio's services as a captain in the Anonymous Mucedorus by giving him the Catalonian prince who has been captured in battle. Later, Segasto bribes Tremelio to kill Mucedorus, but instead Mucedorus kills Tremelio.

TREMELIO

‘A knight appareled in green with wood knife’ in Percy’s A Country Tragedy in Vacunium. He opens the play in early morning, offering Affranio a fond farewell. He later receives a letter deceptively luring him to the spot where his wife, Fulvia, is to have an assignation with her lover, Affranio, believing that he is called upon to protect Affranio from a former enemy. Finding no one there, he slumbers on the stool set beside the on-stage canopy so he is slightly hidden from view. Thence secretly observing their assignation, he privately vows to waylay Affranio in the wood as he travels home and kill him or else die trying. He lays in wait, wood knife drawn, on the path to Affranio’s manor where he ambushes and kills him, cutting out Affranio’s heart and taking it away with him. He later enters with bloody hands upon the scene of Florimel, Amadour, and Clodio’s deaths as Fulvia calls him to witness the ‘blossom cropped of you high family’. He gives Fulvia a cup filled with wine and the ‘pound-powdered’ heart of Affranio. When Tremelio gives her a choice between drinking the wine or stabbing herself with the ‘shouldering’ knife, she takes the knife and kills him with it.

TRENCHMORE, LADY

A fictional character in Middleton's Anything for a Quiet Life. George Cressingham, disguised as a tailor, advises Franklin, disguised as "Sir Andrew," to buy a lot of expensive material from Chamlet's shop. "Gascoyn" lies that a fictional "my lady," "Sir Andrew's" supposed wife, sent a message that she wanted a new gown to go to a fictional Lady Trenchmore's wedding.

TRESILIAN, ROBERT

A lawyer, subsequently Lord Chief Justice of England in the anonymous Thomas of Woodstock; corrupt and unscrupulous, Tresilian is the brain behind all the bad decisions of King Richard II. He devises "blank charters", or blank cheques, as a way for the King to exact money from his subjects; Tresilian is careful to subtract more than half of it for his own use ("Our pains in this must needs be satisfied"). He aids Richard's favorites, Bagot, Bushy, Greene, and Scroop in their plan to "rent" the kingdom from their master. When Richard wants to be rid of Woodstock, his virtuous uncle, Tresilian comes up with the plot: following his suggestion, Richard first takes Woodstock captive under pretence of giving a masque at his house, and then sends him abroad to be murdered. Tresilian is finally betrayed by his clever servant, Nimble, who hands him over to the King's uncles, Lancaster and York, in the final battle. [The historical Tresilian was executed in 1388, before the rise to power of the King's favorites; the playwright has contracted the period (see general historical note) and invented their alliance.]

TRESILLUS

The name the King of Gaul first gives to himself in the Anonymous King Leir while he and Mumford are in England disguised as palmers. Mumford objects to the name, claiming he will never remember it, and so it is discarded. He finally chooses the name Will.

TRESSELL

A gentleman escorting Lady Anne in Shakespeare's Richard III as she transfers Henry VI's corpse from London's St. Paul's Cathedral to Chertsey monastery. After Anne's encounter with Richard, Tressell, along with Berkeley, escorts her away.

TREVEREY

The name of one of the Senators in the anonymous Knack To Know An Honest Man. It is unclear which is so named.

TREVILE **1619

Captain of Otto’s faction in Fletcher’s Bloody Brother. He trades boasting insults with Grandpree. When Rollo and Otto pledge mutual amity, Grandpree, Verdon, Trevile, and Duprete realize that their own ambitions will falter and form an unholy alliance to undo the union. He does not appear again after the first act.

TRIAL

Verifies, along with Proof, the charges leveled against Sisamnes in Preston's Cambises.

TRIBULATION

Tribulation, like Ananias, is the foolish zealot in Jonson's The Alchemist (and also a proper target for Jonson's audience, who had no more tolerance for Anabaptists than for Catholics). Nothing more than a mark for the confidence tricksters. A gull.

TRIBULATION WHOLESOME

Tribulation Wholesome is an austere Puritan pastor of Amsterdam in Jonson's The Alchemist. Tribulation and Ananias require Subtle's services for their Brotherhood. While Ananias maintains that Subtle is a heathen and a devil, Tribulation says that they must use any means they can to help further their Cause. Subtle admits Tribulation and Ananias into the house, promising them, inter alia, to turn copper into golden Dutch dollars for the cause. Tribulation and Ananias go to see the inventory of the goods they are going to take home. Later, Tribulation returns with Ananias and Kastril to complain of having been cheated. When Face, disguised as Jeremy, shuts the door to their face, Tribulation shouts vituperations against the cheaters, calling the house profane as Bel and the Dragon. The frustrated Tribulation and Ananias leave with Kastril. Tribulation and Ananias return with the other complaining defrauded dupes, cursing all those who inhabit that damned house. Tribulation tries to recover some of the goods, but Lovewit says they must first prove ownership, which they cannot. Lovewit threatens to send the Puritans to Amsterdam to their cellar, and Ananias and Tribulation leave.

TRIBUNES

The Roman senators and tribunes in Shakespeare's Cymbeline discuss their emperor's decision to make Caius Lucius the general in charge of invading Britain.

TRICO

Trico is the son of Sylvius, a citizen of Athens in Lyly's Campaspe. Diogenes refuses to teach Trico.

TRIDEWELL, MASTER

A kinsman to Sir Philip Luckless in Brome's The Northern Lass, he tries to dissuade Sir Philip from marrying the widow, Mistress Fitchow. When he fails to do so, he attempts to break off the match by slandering Sir Philip to Mistress Fitchow, but her response to his efforts causes him to fall in love with her himself. He joins Constance, Mistress Trainwell and Anvil among the Masquers at Sir Philip's wedding. Having confessed his feelings for Mistress Fitchow to Sir Philip, he abets Sir Philip in his plan to divorce her. When Mistress Fitchow decides that she, too, wants a divorce, he promises to help assuage her jealousy by ensuring that Constance is married before Sir Philip is free. In fact, however, he has joined Trainwell and Anvil in a plot to bring Constance and Sir Philip together. When this succeeds and the illegitimacy of Sir Philip's 'marriage' to Mistress Fitchow is disclosed, Tridewell wins Mistress Fitchow's hand for himself.

TRIER

Bishop Trier is in league with the Bastard and Saxon against Palsgrave, Savoy and Bohemia at the beginning of Smith's The Hector of Germany. Trier and Mentz crown the Bastard Emperor of Germany after Savoy is placed under arrest. Trier prevents Saxon from stabbing The Bastard during an argument over whether a challenged duel with Palsgrave should be accepted. The Bastard strikes Trier for attempting to stop the fight between the Bastard and Saxon. Palsgrave, Peter and Cullen beat Trier off of a defense of the Bastard. After the rescue, Trier and Mentz give up trying to foster peace between the Bastard and Saxon and decide to let the men fight instead. King John of France sends Trier with Mentz to the English court. In his message, John warns Edward not to interfere in the battle between Savoy and the Bastard. When the ship he is on finds the castaway Young Fitzwaters, Trier suggests that the young man is valiant, and thereby worthy of rescue. Near the conclusion of the play, Palsgrave's cohorts, disguised in costumes from a masque, ambush Trier and his fellow rebels. Trier is imprisoned and condemned. In his final utterance, Trier honors Savoy.

TRIER, FRANK

'In the know', he tells Lacy (so, consequently, the audience) about the peculiar circumstances of Mistress Bonavent in Shirley's Hyde Park. He meets the young woman he is courting, Julietta, but leaves her in the company of Lord Bonville. He spies on Julietta and Bonville, seeing if she will succumb to the bawdy intentions of Bonville–he is 'trying' her character. He admits that he is in serious debt, and, through Fairfield, he manages to get a large sum of money from Carol. In the scenes set in Hyde Park, Trier is quite quiet. He speaks to Carol, only to tell her that he is not seeking more money. Later, he approaches Carol and Julietta when they are in conversation, and expresses surprise that Carol does not abuse him for his rudeness. Julietta drags him away, to allow private discourse between Carol and Fairfield. He asserts his delight that his 'trial' of Julietta has proved her moral, chaste character. But he is shocked when Julietta expresses her annoyance at his distrust. His application for Julietta's hand rebuffed, he is reduced to asking Julietta to think charitably about him. A willow is put on his head by Bonavent, symbolizing his single status.

TRIER, FREDERICK, ARCHBISHOP of

Frederick, Archbishop of Trier and Duke of Lorrain in the anonymous Alphonsus Emperor of Germany, is one of the seven Electors of Germany, and Chancellor of Italy. He and Brandenburg are described as "simple men that wish the common good". He supports the election of Bohemia as co-Emperor; is Secretary in the revels; and fights for Alphonsus against Richard.

TRIFLE, SOLEMN

Justice of the Peace and uncle to Lady Loveright in Davenant's News From Plymouth. He is characterized by his loquaciousness and habit of finishing other people's sentences, often contrary to the intent of the original speaker. He is tricked by Seawit into preparing to both plead and judge the comparative worthiness of the nine worthies in the belief that Carrack's guests will later hear the result of his efforts. Topsail invites him to present the trial to a group of sailors instead. Once all the sailors have fallen asleep listening to him, he becomes angry and drinks himself to sleep. Once he has recovered, he begins his regular practice of disseminating fallacious news. Among the news, he includes a report that his niece has agreed to marry Topsail. He is confident that she will do so rather than diminish his credit by proving his story false. When this assumption proves false, Topsail promises to ruin Trifles credit. Additionally, Topsail stages a scene in which the disguised Porter threatens to arrest Trifle for spreading false news. As a result, Trifle is forced to flee the country.

TRILLABUB**1637

A "ghost character" and likely fictitious in the anonymous The Wasp. Howlet, disguised as a hangman, alludes to an argument he had with Trillabub the sergeant.

TRIMALCHIO

The son of a recently deceased usurer in Marmion's Holland's Leaguer, Trimalchio is a ready mark for Agurtes and Autolicus. He is convinced that the woman presented to him by Agurtes is a fine lady, and he is all too willing to do his best to win that lady. Arrested after rioting in a bawdy house, Trimalchio is taken before the disguised Agurtes and then released through a plea from Milliscent. At the play's end, Trimalchio discovers that Milliscent, whom he has wed, is Agurtes' daughter.

TRIMTRAM

Trimtram is Chough's faithful servant in Middleton and Rowley's A Fair Quarrel. He does not contribute anything to the plot, but engages in comic banter with Chough, and accompanies him everywhere, hence his name (which comes from the saying, 'Trim, tram, like master, like man').

TRIMWELL, MR.

Mr Trimwell is a barber-surgeon in Jordan's Walks of Islington and Hogsden, jealous of his wife Mrs Trimwell and Frank Rivers. He follows her and the gallants to the King's Head, disguising himself as a blind cittern-player, but is outwitted and forced to pay the whole bill there. Knowing Rivers' short temper, he arranges for Rivers to be goaded into wounding Mr Hemlock, and has him arrested for this crime. When he discovers that Rivers is really his wife's brother, he finally realizes that his jealousy is groundless.

TRIMWELL, MRS.

Wife of Mr Trimwell the surgeon in Jordan's Walks of Islington and Hogsden. She receives the attentions of the young gallant Frank Rivers. Taken to the gallants by Pimpwell, she accompanies them to the inns they go to, and even to the prison. She insists that she has never yet been unfaithful to her husband, but is strongly tempted by Rivers' repeated attempts to seduce her. Rivers reveals at the end that he is really her brother.

TRINCALO, THOMAS **1615

Pandolfo’s farmer in Tomkis’ Albumazar. He has rented a farm in Tottenham for ten pounds these last thirteen years. He loves Armellina and woos her with words learnt at the Fortune and Red Bull playhouses and presents a parody of several famous lines including “O lips, no lips, but leaves besmeared with mildew." He agrees to allow Albumazar to transform him into Antonio with the purpose of bestowing Fulvia upon Pandolfo. In exchange, Pandolfo is to urge the false Antonio to bestow “his" maid Armellina on Trincalo and give them two hundred crowns and free rent on the Tottenham farm. Unable to keep the secret, he tells the plan to Cricca. After the ceremony, Albumazar tells Trincalo that he looks like Antonio for a day but must avoid all looking glasses or the spell will disolve. He is duped when Ronca pretends to recognize him as Antonio and gives him ten pounds to “repay" a bail that he says Antonio stood for him before going to Barbary. Trincalo puffs himself up and wants great men to call him Tony. Harpax comes to claim ten pounds from “Antonio" that he lent him, but Trincalo gives him only five. Ronca then returns in disguise and cuts his purse for the remaining five. Trincalo/Antonio is taken to Bevilona’s house to carouse, but when her “husband" comes home (Ronca in disguise), he must hide in an empty hogshead. Ronca calls to fill the barrel, nearly drowning Trincalo. Ronca pretends a jealous rage until he discovers it is “Antonio" and feasts him instead. He goes to Antonio’s house to do his work and there meets the real Antonio. Not knowing him, he tells Antonio that he is Antonio. Not knowing the tables have been turned, he believes the trick is working when first Lelio and then Armellina call him Antonio. She tricks him inside and locks him in the cellar. Upon Trincalo’s escape from Antonio’s cellar, he comes upon Pandolfo, who beats him until Trincalo tells him what has really happened and that Pandolfo’s plate and gold have been stolen indeed. He learns from Cricca that he’s been given Armellina in marriage with two hundred crowns as his portion and twenty pounds per year for three lifetimes. He delivers the epilogue, glorying in his good fortune and inviting everyone to come to his place in Tottenham four nights hence.

TRINCALO, TRANSFORMATION **1615

An imaginary character in Tomkis’ Albumazar. Trincalo imagines naming his and Armellina’s first born Transformation Trincalo because he will be got after Trincalo transforms himself (through Pandolfo’s magic) into Antonio. Later, Trincalo imagines getting a Knight’s daughter for the boy’s bride and buying him a pedigree from a Welsh herald.

TRINCULO

Court jester to Alonso, the King of Naples in Shakespeare's The Tempest. Trinculo accompanies Alonso back from the wedding of Claribel, Alonso's daughter, to the King of Tunis, when they are stranded on Prospero's island. Trinculo becomes separated from the rest of Alonso's party when he comes across Caliban. Caliban hides from Trinculo, thinking that he is a spirit sent to torment him. Trinculo, not realizing that Caliban is there, takes shelter under Caliban's cloak from an impending thunderstorm. Stefano happens upon the two of them under the gabardine and humorously mistakes them for a single creature with four arms and legs and two voices (one 'forward' and one 'behind' voice). Together they all become drunk and, emboldened by drink, plot to murder Prospero. However, Ariel prevents the murder by leading them around the island until they fall into a pool.

TRINEUS **1607

Only mentioned in Beaumont's Knight of the Burning Pestle. On his first entrance as the grocer in The Grocer's Honour portion of the play, Rafe reads from Palmerin d'Oliva (misidentified in the s.d. as Palmerin of England) in which this character is named.

TRINITY TERM

An allegorical personage for the summer term at the Inns of Court in Middleton's Michaelmas Term; he pays homage to Michaelmas Term in the play's induction.

TRINULTIO, ALPHONSO

A "ghost character" in Ford's Love's Sacrifice. The name of the artist whose portraits of Biancha and Fiormunda are used by D'avolos to trap Fernando into revealing his love for the Duchess. The picture-maker is said to reside 'by the castle's farther drawbridge, near Galeazzos'.

TRIO

Trio (Fulcinius), consul, cohort of Sejanus in Jonson's Sejanus His Fall.

TRIP

Trip is a page in Marston's What You Will who discusses the nature of pages and their masters with Noose, Doit, Holifernes Pippo, Bidet and Slip.

TRIPES

Tripes is one of the two sergeants who arrests Mercurio at the suit of Mr Nice in Jordan's Walks of Islington and Hogsden. He then boasts about his corrupt activities, and claims to be the godfather of Richard Philpot. At the instigation of Mr Trimwell he arrests Flylove, and oversees the arrest of Rivers.

TRIPHOENA

Though wife of Philautus, Triphoena has a very small role in Marmion's Holland's Leaguer. She seems ashamed of her brother Capritio and has hired a tutor to help refine him. She also requests that Trimalchio take Capritio under his wing, an adventure that results in Capritio's involvement in a bawdy house and marriage to a waiting-maid.

TRIPHON

A "ghost character" in Bale's God's Promises. Mentioned by John Baptist as an example of a sinful man.

TRIPOLY TUB, SQUIRE

A witty gentleman in Jonson's A Tale of A Tub. He wishes to marry Audrey Turfe. After his man, Basket Hilts, successfully has John Clay arrested and spirits Audrey away from her parents, Squire Tripoly Tub woos Audrey and gets a lukewarm acceptance. Before he can marry her, however, he is arrested by the Pursuivant (actually Miles Metaphor) and informed he must appear before the Queen's Council. Preamble takes charge of Audrey, but Hilts successfully threatens Metaphor into confessing that he is actually Justice Preamble's clerk and that Preamble plans to marry Audrey himself. Squire Tripoly Tub plans to enlist Audrey's father, Tobie Turfe, in foiling Preamble's plot. He finds Turfe and quickly convinces him that the abduction and the accusation against Clay (both actually his own device) were part of Justice Preamble's plot to steal Audrey, but then loses track of all the relevant parties. Finally meeting up with Miles Metaphor, he and Hilts again get him to confess Preamble and Canon Hugh's plot. He proposes that Metaphor bring Audrey and the money to him instead, and Metaphor and Hilts can split the money. Metaphor agrees willingly when Tub promises to take responsibility for the plot. When Audrey arrives, she warns Tub that his mother was at her house, looking for him. Returning from the Turfes' house, his mother accosts him and insists that her man, Pol-Marten, escort Audrey to Canon Hugh's. Joined by Dame Sybil Turfe, they all head off to Canon Hugh's, but learn, upon discovering John Clay hidden in a barn, that Audrey is again vulnerable to abduction. Squire Tripoly Tub runs ahead to intercept Audrey and orders Pol-Marten to bring her, disguised, to the Canon's. Meeting the Council of Finsbury, he proposes that they write and perform a "masque" for Audrey's wedding, to be presented at his house, Tubs Hall. At the Canon's, it is discovered that, taken in by her disguise, Canon Hugh has married Audrey to Pol-Marten. Her parents, relieved to learn Pol-Marten is a gentleman, bless the marriage, and Tub generously has the wedding masque revised to honor her and her bridegroom.

TRIPPIT, [PENELOPE]

Trippit, the queen's maid in Quarles' The Virgin Widow, encourages her mistress to believe the worst of the king and Kettreena and attempts to frame Kettreena for the death of Pertenax. She dies along with her mistress when the latter challenges the oracle. Presumably she is also the Penelope Trippit whose bill is read out by Quack.

TRIPSHORT, BLITHE

Niece to Sir Swithin Whimlby in Brome's The New Academy. She and Erasmus are most removed from and critical of the foolish characters around them. She rejects the plan by Sir Whimlby and Lady Nestlecock that she marry Nehemiah, pointing out that she would quickly grow tired of laughing at him, does not find beating him worth the trouble, and does not want to be reduced to the "common town-trick" of cuckolding him. Her uncle takes her to the New Academy in hopes that she may be taught to requite Nehemiah's wooing in a courtly manner. While there, Erasmus helps her hide from Nehemiah and is secretly married to her himself.

TRISMEGISTOS, HERMES

Only mentioned in Jonson's The Alchemist. When Face acts as the alchemist's apprentice Lungs before Mammon, he describes the alchemical process. Face says that the retort broke because of too much heat, and what was saved was put into the pelican, the alembic, and signed with Hermes' seal. The reference is to Hermes Trismegistos or Hermes the "thrice greatest." The Greek name refers to the Egyptian god Thoth, reputed author of hermetic books, encyclopedic works on Egyptian religion, art, and science.

TRISTRAM **1638

Servant to Jeremy Hold–fast in Glapthorne’s Wit in a Constable. He has some witty repartee at the opening of the play concerning his master’s supposed learning at Cambridge and then disappears from the text.

TRISTAM WIDGROOM

A "ghost character" in Chamberlain's Swaggering Damsel. Muchcraft tells Budget about him. He was sued by William Woodcock but won the case.

TRISTAN

Tristan is a soldier and friend of Altesto, Frivolo and Vasco in Davenant's Love and Honor. He enters to them to report that the battle is done. He seems slightly more serious than his friends; he tells Frivolo that he should marry Lelia because her mother is wealthy, but does not join in with mocking the Widow, or try to persuade her to marry Vasco. He does, however, arrive with the others the day after the wedding to tease the Widow and Vasco. Apparently at the Widow's request, he brings Lelia and the Widow to the place of execution, but Vasco asks them to leave, which they do.

TRISTELLA

Tristella in Day's Law Tricks is the pseudonym used by Emilia when she returns to Genoa.

TRISTRAM

A "ghost character" in Hawkins's Apollo Shroving. Novice names Tristram in a list of boys who have left "the satchell" and "turne[d] fine gentlemen" while entreating Complement to "consider" tutoring him, and Implement claims that each boy in this list has "profited very well" under Captaine Complement and himself.

TRISTRAM TRUSTY

Tristram Trusty is Gawin Goodluck's best friend in Udall's Ralph Roister Doister. After Dame Christian Custance suspects that Sim Suresby may have misunderstood her relationship to Ralph Roister Doister, she summons Trusty, explains the unwanted advances she has received from that quarter, and assures him that she is absolutely devoted to Goodluck. Trusty believes her, and after Goodluck's return, does indeed stand warrant for the widow's constancy.

TRITON

At Ceres' request in Heywood's The Silver Age, this god searches the seas for the missing Proserpine, but in vain.

TRITONS

Non-speaking roles in the anonymous Two Noble Ladies and the Converted Conjurer. Two Tritons are raised by Cyprian and drag the Soldiers away. It is not clear whether the Tritons are intended as real creatures, or whether they are merely a symbolic representation of the freak tide raised by Cyprian to save Justina.

TRIUMVIRATE (SECOND)

The second triumvirate is represented in Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. Historically, the first triumvirate of Rome was unofficial and consisted of Julius Caesar, Crassus, and Pompey. The second triumvirate was official and consisted of the following (note, each is given full notice under his individual listing in this index):
  • CAESAR, OCTAVIUS;
  • ANTONY or ANTONIUS, MARCUS;
  • LEPIDUS, MARCUS AEMILIUS.

TRIVIA

Trivia is, along with Simperina, Imperia's maid in the Anonymous Blurt, Master Constable. When Imperia says she feels sick with the heat, Trivia tries to prevent her from vomiting. Listening to Imperia's singing out of key, Trivia and Simperina make a show of admiring her voice. Imperia notices Trivia and Simperina's complimentary manner and tells them to stop, telling them that she does not have a gown to cast off till the next week. At Imperia's request, Simperina and Trivia read in alternate dialogue the lyrics of Hipolito's sonnet about a woman's chaste heart. When Doyt brings Fontinel's portrait, Trivia is asked to hold it. Trivia admires Fontinel's face, saying it is most sweetly made. Imperia orders her maids to prepare a banquet, rushing them to execute the commands. Trivia is visibly displeased with being rushed, but she pretends to execute the orders in a hurry. When Fontinel pretends to declare his love for Imperia, Trivia enters with Frisco and Simperina. While Frisco announces that there is somebody at the door claiming to be Camillo and Hipolito, Trivia and Simperina seem very frightened. At Imperia's orders, they smooth her gown and shuffle the rushes, while Fontinel hides in Imperia's closet.

TRIVULCI**1637

The proper name of the Duke in Glapthorne's Ladie's Privilege, which appears only in stage directions.

TRIVULSI

Trivulsi is a nobleman in Shirley's The Young Admiral who loyally serves the king of Sicily.

TRIZHAM **1618

One of Baiazet's seven sons in Goffe's Raging Turk, he shares with five of the others resentment that his youngest brother Corcutus has been made emperor. His father deputes him, along with his brother Mahomet, to prevent Zemes from escaping after their battle. Along with Mahomet, he tries to dissuade his father from making war on Rome, but is strangled by Baiazet, Selymus, and Isaack for letting Zemes escape.

TROADA

Listed in the dramatis personae of the anonymous Philander, King of Thrace. Characteristics and actions not given in the surviving plot.

TROILUS **1599

I.
Also spelled Troylus in Chettle and Dekker's Troilus and Cressida. He first appears about a third of the way into the play with Pandarus as they meet Cressida and her maid, who carries a light. He does not appear again until the final third of the play when he along with Deiphobus and a proctor meet Cressida, who is accompanied by beggars. He appears in the final scene with Diomede, and it is probable they fight. During this sequence, they are met by Achilles and Hector (and apparently Deiphobus), and it seems likely that the probable fight between Troilus and Diomede hastens the meeting and final conflict between Achilles and Hector.
II.
Son of Priam in Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida. With the aid of Pandarus, Troilus succeeds in wooing Cressida. She betrays him with Diomedes after she is given as a prisoner to the Greeks in exchange for Antenor. He fights with Diomedes, but their battle is as inconclusive as the war itself.
III.
Only mentioned in the Anonymous Blurt, Master Constable. At the banquet in Camillo's house, Hipolito asks whether Camillo's French prisoner drinks well, and Camillo denies it. Hipolito uses the common stereotype that any Frenchman should be addicted to drinking or whoring, since they are as resolute as Hector and as valiant as Troilus.
IV.
Only mentioned in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night. When Viola offers Feste money, he jokingly says that he would play Pandarus to bring Cressida (another coin) to this Troilus. Viola obliges him with more money.
V.
One of the chief Trojan warriors in Heywood's 1 The Iron Age, Troilus is a son of Priam and Hecuba and brother to Hector, Deiphobus, Cassandra, and many more. He is in love with Cressida, the daughter of the priest Calchas, at one point asserting that her beauty surpasses that of Helen. He supports Aeneas in calling for an armed force to be sent to Greece to free Hesione. Like his father and brothers, he warmly welcomes Helen when Paris brings her to Troy. At the feast that Priam hosts for the Greeks, Troilus argues with Diomedes, the Greek warrior to whom Cressida will turn when her father Calchas informs her that Troy is fated to fall. Twice during the battle sequences, Troilus encounters Diomedes, and on each occasion has the better of the combat. Following the death of Hector, Paris notes that all may yet be well because Troilus is still alive and the Greeks are almost as afraid of him as they were of Hector. Indeed, when Troilus next enters the fighting, he routs the Greeks, and only the reappearance of Achilles stops his rampage. Waiting until he is certain that the Trojan warrior is exhausted from fighting, Achilles confronts Troilus but does not attack him individually. Instead, he orders his men to gang up on Troilus and to slaughter him in the same way they had Hector. It is this dishonorable behavior by Achilles that provokes Paris to kill the Greek in a similarly disgraceful way (by treacherously shooting him with an arrow as he goes to marry Polyxena).
VI.
A "ghost character" in Heywood's 2 The Iron Age, mentioned in connection with Cressida's infidelity and the massacre of the Trojan royalty.

TROILUS **1599

A fictitious character in Marston's Histrio-Mastix. Troilus is a character in a play staged by Sir Oliver Owlet's Men.

TROILUS **1627

Only mentioned in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. Caradoc asserts that his own lice are descended from the "magnanimous lice of ap Shinkin ap Shon ap Owen ap Richard ap Morgan ap Hugh ap Brutus ap Sylvius ap Æneas ap Troilus ap Hector."

TROILUS **1635

A part being played by the actor Menester in Richards' Messalina when he catches Messalina's eye.

TROILUS'S GHOST

Main character, though mute, of one of the five dumb shows Jupiter orders which features those slain by the machinations of Venus and Fortune. Spelled Troylus in the original in the anonymous Rare Triumphs Of Love And Fortune.

TROLLIO

Trollio is a servant to Meleander in Ford's The Lover's Melancholy, and along with Cleophila he is one of the only people to wait on the aged lord in his disgrace and distraction. He is somewhat reminiscent of the clownlike but cunning servants of the Commedia dell'Arte. Cleophila responds to his griping about the lack of comfort in their household by rebuking him for being "weary of this sullen living." He is particularly obsessed with food, and repeatedly begs Meleander to eat so that he, too, can do so. When Meleander's madness takes a violent turn in one scene, Trollio appears in a morion, which he claims will protect him from "a clap on the coxcomb." However, Meleander shows his trust in his "honest" servant by relinquishing his weapon to him. Trollio reports the final fight between Cuculus and Grilla to Thamasta, then disappears from the play as its more serious plots come to fruition.

TROMPART

Strumbo's boy in the Anonymous Locrine. In I.iii, a comic interlude, he has to take Strumbo's letter to Mistress Dorothie. When later it seems his master lies dead on the battlefield, the boy cries, "Thieves, thieves," and thus tricks Strumbo into leaping up.

TROTH**1513

A "ghost character" in the anonymous Hick Scorner. One among the "true religious" men and "holy women" whom Hick Scorner was glad to see drown in the Irish Sea at the Race of Ireland when their thirteen ships foundered and sank.

TROTT, ROGER **1599

Searcher in the service of the Rector in Ruggle’s Club Law. He attends Musonius when he comes with a writ to catch Niphle in his lechery with Luce at Tavie’s house. After the searchers find Niphle hiding in a tub with a beggar-wench and parade them to jail in the tub, he helps Purcus to arrest Luce.

TROTTER **1590

Trotter is the Miller's clownish servant in [?]Wilson's Fair Em, the Miller's Daughter. He is in love with Em. He claims to be overworked and asks Em to restore his health by marrying him. He is hostile to Manvile and the other suitors.

TROTTER **1636

Trotter is a bandit in the band of ruffians that kidnap and attempt to gang rape Evadne in Rawlins's The Rebellion. Trotter asks the Captian to be the first to molest Evadne. Trotter is chased away by Sebastian, who he mistakes for Orlando the Furious.

TROUBLE–ALL

There are two manifestations of Trouble-all in Jonson's Bartholomew Fair.
  • Trouble-all is a madman. As his name suggests, he creates confusion at the Fair because of his obsessive questions. According to Busy, Trouble-all was an officer in the court of Justice Overdo a year before. Since Justice Overdo caused him to lose his job, Busy reports that Trouble-all ran mad and would do nothing but by Justice Overdo's warrant. At the Fair, Trouble-all enters upon the scene in which Overdo/Madman is being put into the stocks on the charge of having stolen Cokes' purses. Trouble-all asks the officers if they have a warrant from Justice Overdo. The irony is evident, since the prisoner is Justice Overdo in disguise. Lost and deprived of all his goods, Cokes sees Trouble-all and asks the madman to help him get home. Inevitably, Trouble-all asks for a warrant from Justice Overdo, and Cokes says Overdo is his brother-in-law. In his madman's logic, Trouble-all instructs Cokes to go home, get a warrant, and then he would help him get home. When Grace Wellborn asks Trouble-all to choose between two code-names in her book, representing the names of her two suitors, Trouble-all makes the choice at random and leaves. Later, Trouble-all enters the place where Busy and Overdo/Madman are locked in the stocks. When Trouble-all argues with the officers over the name of Justice Overdo, he succeeds in confusing them, and thus they forget if they locked the stocks. Busy and Overdo/Madman take the opportunity to escape. At some point, Trouble-all disappears, since Quarlous impersonates him. In the final scene, Trouble-all enters hiding his nakedness with a dripping pan, followed by Ursula, who claims he has stolen her pan. Ursula reports how a gentleman (Quarlous) had stripped Trouble-all in her booth and left him there. Seeing both the true and the false Trouble-all, Overdo forces Quarlous to reveal himself.
  • Trouble-all is also a disguise. Wishing to discover what was written in Grace's book, Quarlous steals Trouble-all's clothes in Ursula's booth. Disguised as Trouble-all, Quarlous enters the puppet-theatre followed by Dame Purecraft. When Grace enters with Winwife, Quarlous/Trouble-all asks her to show him the book, under the maniacal pretext to mark the name again, and again. Seeing that Winwife is the elected suitor, Quarlous decides to accept Dame Purecraft's suit. Since Overdo (as the Porter) wants to amend the wrong he had done to the madman Trouble-all, that is unwittingly driving him mad and causing his obsession with Overdo, the justice promises Quarlous/Trouble-all to give him whatever he wishes. According with the madman's idiosyncrasy, Quarlous/Trouble-all demands a warrant from Justice Overdo. Overdo goes to the scrivener's and brings Quarlous an official blank document with his name and seal. Quarlous/Trouble-all leaves with Dame Purecraft. He re-enters the puppet-theatre at the very moment when Justice Overdo reveals himself from his disguise as a Porter. Seeing that he had a valid blank warrant from Justice Overdo, and when the naked but real Trouble-all enters with Ursula, Quarlous reveals himself from the disguise as Trouble-all and claims Dame Purecraft.

TROUBLESOME

Family name of Lady and Sir Timothy Troublesome in Sharpham's Cupid's Whirligig.

TROUBLESOME, LADY

The chaste and devoted wife of Sir Timothy Troublesome in Sharpham's Cupid's Whirligig. The Lady resists the efforts of various suitors, including Nucome, Master Exhibition, and Young Lord Nonsuch (both as himself and disguised as the braggart Captain Woodly and the beggar turned servant Slacke). Frustrated by her husband's suspicions, she considers indulging in an affair, but rejects this notion, choosing instead to accuse her husband as he has accused her, claiming he has had affairs with his laundress's daughter, the household servants, and Lady Troublesome's cousin Peg. Receiving a love letter from Young Lord Nonsuch, Lady Troublesome rejects him and shows the letter to her husband, instigating a plot to catch Young Nonsuch as he attempts to visit the house. When Young Nonsuch enters in disguise, Lady Troublesome's husband sends the two of them off, but the Lady resists Young Nonsuch's importunities, causing him to plot vengeance against her. Young Lord Nonsuch returns to the house as Slacke, a begging soldier who Troublesome hires as a servant. Slacke confesses his love to Lady Troublesome and is again rejected by her. He encourages Troublesome to divorce his wife, and the knight sends Slacke to purchase a divorce. In desperation, Lady Troublesome asks the servant Wages to negotiate a reconciliation with her husband, and he does this by allowing each to overhear the other's conversation, but the reconciliation is short-lived and Troublesome announces he will marry his Lady's cousin Peg. Lady Troublesome is then courted by Young Nonsuch in yet another disguise, Captain Woodly the braggart, and rejects him. When her husband arrives as she is being courted by Exhibition and Captain Woodly, Lady Troublesome convinces the two suitors to stage a fight so her husband will have no further suspicions. Slacke convinces Troublesome to be jealous of Captain Woodly, and Troublesome again sends for a divorce. Lady Troublesome is furious about the divorce, but when she asks Troublesome to reconcile, he flees. In the whirligig scene, the Lady complains about Slacke's devotion to her, causing Nan to confess her love for Slacke. Lady Troublesome helps arrange the mixed-up tokens of the women taking part in the masked marriages, and she winds up re-married to Troublesome.

TROYLO–SAVELLI

Troylo-Savelli is the nephew and heir of Octavio, the Marquis of Sienna, and the friend of Livio in Ford's The Fancies Chaste and Noble. He alarms Livio by tales of the sexual corruption of courts in order to persuade him that Castamela would be safer in the Bower of Fancies kept by the Marquis, who, he tells Livio, is impotent. We later learn that Troylo-Savelli is in love with Castamela, whom he marries at play's end.

TRUE WEDLOCK**1513

A "ghost character" in the anonymous Hick Scorner. A sin destroyer. One among the "true religious" men and "holy women" whom Hick Scorner was glad to see drown in the Irish Sea at the Race of Ireland when their thirteen ships foundered and sank.

TRUELOCK

Truelock is a friend of Letoy's in Brome's The Antipodes and surrogate father to Diana.

TRUEPENNY

Truepenny is Violetta's page in the Anonymous Blurt, Master Constable. The name suggests a trusty person and an honest fellow. He acts as a go-between in the exchange of love letters between Violetta and Fontinel. Outside a tennis court, Fontinel confesses his undying love for Violetta to Truepenny. Truepenny notes that Fontinel does not have the haggard look usually associated with a hopeless romantic lover. When the jealous Camillo orders that Fontinel be taken to prison, the Frenchman asks Truepenny to vouch for Violetta's love and that they have been exchanging love letters. The page denies any involvement and diplomatically leaves, fearing a beating by Camillo. At Violetta's house, Truepenny brings her a message from Fontinel, saying he received it from Frisco, Imperia's groom. The message contains Fontinel's instructions for his planned secret marriage to Violetta.

TRUEPENNY, PINCHBACK **1627

A "ghost character" in Randolph's Plutophthalmia. Father of Plutus, god of wealth. He is the "rich usurer of Islington" and a friend of Scrape-all's.

TRUEPENNY, TOM

Tom Truepenny is a boy servant in the household of Dame Christian Custance in Udall's Ralph Roister Doister. He is misled by Dobinet Doughty into thinking the ring and token the latter brings is from the widow's beloved Gawin Goodluck, and along with Tibet Talkapace, Annot Alyface, and Margery Mumblecrust, is chastised by Dame Custance for bringing the unwanted gifts and communications from Ralph Roister Doister.

TRUEWIT

Truewit is a gentleman and Clerimont's friend in Jonson's Epicoene. He tries to help Dauphine in a plot of dissuading Morose from marriage. At Clerimont's house in London, Truewit enters and lectures his friend on his repugnant taste for partying. Dauphine informs his friends that his uncle intends to disinherit him and marry a supposedly silent woman. Truewit has his own plan to help Dauphine. Truewit enters Morose's house blowing a post horn, although he knows that Morose hates noise. Truewit tries to persuade Morose to give up his intention of marriage, arguing that silent and reliable wives are hard to find these days. At Daw's house, Truewit enters announcing his friends that he has dissuaded Morose from marrying, but Cutbeard intervenes saying that, on the contrary, Morose intends to speed the marriage arrangement, because he suspects his nephew behind Truewit's plot. Truewit exits with Clerimont to set up another plot. At Morose's house, Truewit enters to congratulate Morose on his recent marriage to Epicoene, announcing the imminent arrival of a party of revelers to celebrate the nuptials. When the collegiate ladies and their merry party arrive, Morose is horrified with the noise and exits in a hurry, while Truewit and Clerimont remain behind and comment on the favorable outcome of their plot. Dauphine enters to inform his friends that Morose wants a divorce, so Truewit and Clerimont are satisfied with their exploits. Truewit plays a scene in which Daw and La-Foole are publicly humiliated by turning each against the other, locking them in separate rooms, and then having Dauphine kick them while the ladies are watching. Truewit arranges with Clerimont that Otter and Cutbeard should impersonate a Divine and a Canon Lawyer counseling Morose. Truewit attends the final revelation scene and has the concluding speech in the play, lecturing the foolish knights on their self-infatuation and the ladies on their errors. Truewit then addresses the audience, inviting them to applaud if they liked the comedy, because Morose is now gone and they need not fear the noise.

TRULL, FIRST and SECOND

Two Trulls figure in Goffe's The Courageous Turk:
  • The unnamed First and Second Trulls participate in a fight with one another as proxies in the dispute between the First and Second Soldiers. During the female combat, the First Trull taunts her antagonist by claiming the Second Solder, the woman's lover, has the "itch" (either skin eruptions caused by the itch mite or venereal disease) and so should expect to have foul washings.
  • The Second Trull, associated with the Second Soldier (or corporal), is forced to fight the First Trull as a way of settling the argument between the two men.

TRULLA, or GRULLA

A fury in the anonymous Wisest Have Their Fools whom, along with Medaea, Mennippa, and Sill, Edentula summons to pinch Silly when he foolishly woos Urina. The name (at line 926) is not well written and so difficult to decipher.

TRUMAN

Family name of Old Truman and Young Truman in Cowley's The Guardian as well as his 1658 revision of that play, Cutter of Coleman Street (performed 1661).

TRUMBALL

A Scottish Sergeant and trumpeter to the Queen Regent of Scotland (Mary of Guise) in Sampson's The Vow-Breaker, he is sent by the Queen Regent to Lord Grey to enquire as to Queen Elizabeth's grievance against her.

TRUMP

A "ghost character" in Hawkins's Apollo Shroving. Novice names Trump in a list of boys who have left "the satchell" and "turne[d] fine gentlemen" while entreating Complement to "consider" tutoring him, and Implement claims that each boy in this list has "profited very well" under Captaine Complement and himself.

TRUMPET

A mute role in Fisher's Fuimus Troes. A soldier who enters with Caesar in I. ii.

TRUMPETER

A Trumpeter in Dekker's The Whore of Babylon appears with the Herald and sounds once to direct public attention to the Empress of Babylon's proclamation.

TRUNDLE, BARNABE

Barnabe Trundle is the name adopted by Stuff, the tailor, when he disguises as Lady Frampul's coachman in Jonson's The New Inn. In the stables at the New Inn, Prudence instructs Trundle to get the coach ready and lead the horses out but half a mile in the field. Then, he should come back at the back gate with the coach curtains pulled down. Prudence instructs him that, if somebody inquires about his passenger, he should say he has brought Lady Frampul's kinswoman (Frank in disguise). Trundle/Stuff is incredulous of the whole affair, but finally is convinced to obey and exits to do his job. In the servants' room at the inn, Trundle/Stuff enters with Ferret, Pierce, Peck, and Jordan. The merry group of servants indulges in gossip and drinking, patronized by Tipto and Fly, who join them in libations. The company of servants is organized according to the military hierarchy, with Fly as the quartermaster of the staff officers, and Trundle/Stuff as the carriage master. When the whistle sounds for dinner, the merry party of drunkards disperses. Although Colonel Tipto wants his drinking party to stay longer, Trundle/Stuff says he has to go to the stable and salute the mares. Pierce says that Trundle is as drunk as a fish and almost dead with alcohol. Trundle/Stuff plays the Crier in the mock court of love presided by Prudence. When the court of love is adjourned till the next one-hour session in the evening, Trundle/Stuff announces that any man and woman who wish to attend should keep the second hour. Trundle/Stuff enters with Jordan and Jug. He asks for drinks and reports he has brought another lady at the inn. Trundle/Stuff exits and re-enters with Pinnacia, who calls him his bodyguard. Finally, Trundle is revealed as Stuff the tailor, Pinnacia's husband.

TRUNNEL, THOMAS

A workman in the shipyard in Mountfort's The Launching of The Mary. The workmen quarrel genially as they work, and mutter about the massacre of Englishmen by the Dutch at Amboyna (although the reference to Amboyna was deleted by the censor). Later, they meet in a tavern, and Sheathing-Nail tells the story of the massacre (this too was censored). Trunnel encourages the workmen to taunt Dorothea Constance, whom they assume to be as unconstant as the other women in town, but they are chased off by Captain Fitzjohn. When the Mary is launched, the workmen entertain the East India Company board members with "some dainty dance, every one wearing the emblem of his name upon his head."

TRUSSELL, SIR WILLIAM

At the abdication confrontation with Edward II in Marlowe's Edward II, Sir William Trussell, the Earl of Leicester, and the Bishop of Winchester face the king and urge him to give up his crown. Trussell is there to convey the king's decision to Parliament.

TRUSSIER

A Scythian Lord in the Anonymous Locrine.

TRUST **1617

A “ghost character" in the anonymous Pathomachia. One of the nine inferior Affections. An agent of Hope who attended the Parliament during Hope’s absence.

TRUSTY

Steward to the Lady Covet in May's The Old Couple. He is companion of her Chaplain, Fruitful, unaware that he is Scudmore in disguise. They first appear discussing Covet's wedding preparations, which include the signing of certain legal papers. It is not clear whether Trusty, who witnesses the pre-nuptial deed intended to deprive Sir Argent of his bride's estates, is simply obeying her orders or is complicit in Fruitful's privately declared aim of liberating Lady Covet from her corrupting wealth for her own sake. He is last seen breaking to Lady Covet the bad news that her trustees are not to be trusted, which sends her into such a panic that she repents of her avarice.

TRUSTY, MISTRESS

Mistress Trusty is Haughty's companion in Jonson's Epicoene. At Morose's house, Trusty enters accompanying Haughty and the collegiate ladies. Trusty attends the party and exits with Haughty and the other ladies. During the scene when Epicoene wants to make her husband look like a madman before the others, a fervent debate arises regarding the possible cure for madness. Epicoene and the party of Epicureans invoke Paracelsus as a master of the curative procedures while Daw avers that the most knowledgeable in this subject are the moral philosophers. To end the dispute, Haughty sends for Trusty who, she says, comes from a family of mad people. According to Haughty, Trusty's father and mother were both mad, when they put their daughter as her companion. When Trusty enters, Haughty tells her she must decide on a controversy regarding the cure for madness. Trusty responds that her mother was cured with the Sick Man's Salve, and her father with the Groat's–worth of Wit. Both readings were so boring that they read themselves asleep on those books. In addition, Trusty says that an old woman, their physician, prescribed them to go to church twice a week. Since that particular parish had a very boring preacher, they were sure to fall asleep during the service. After delivering her opinion on hypnotherapy as a cure for madness, Trusty exits with Haughty's party. Trusty re-enters with the collegiate ladies and attends the final revelation scene.

TRUSTY ROGER

Roger is listed as Trusty Roger in the dramatis personae of (?)Heywood's A Warning For Fair Women and is called that once in the stage directions as well as in the long, descriptive title of the play.

TRUSTY, TRISTRAM

Tristram Trusty is Gawin Goodluck's best friend in Udall's Ralph Roister Doister. After Dame Christian Custance suspects that Sim Suresby may have misunderstood her relationship to Ralph Roister Doister, she summons Trusty, explains the unwanted advances she has received from that quarter, and assures him that she is absolutely devoted to Goodluck. Trusty believes her, and after Goodluck's return, does indeed stand warrant for the widow's constancy.

TRUTH **1567

Truth attends the marriage of Hermione and Horestes in Pickering's Horestes. Truth closes the play encouraging the audience to pray for all the civil authorities.

TRUTH **1553

This is an alternative name for Verity in Udall's? Respublica.

TRUTH **1591

Truth appears on stage at the beginning of the anonymous True Tragedy of Richard III with Poetry. Truth answers a series of questions by Truth and by so doing provides the audience with an exposition to the War of the Roses.

TRUTH **1594

Enters at the start of Yarington's Two Lamentable Tragedies after Homicide and Avarice exit and prepares the audience for the two ensuing tragedies by briefly introducing both plots. Reappears at the end of Act 2, as Merry is cutting up Beech's body. Truth addresses the audience and hopes they will never consider such acts as Merry has committed. Enters again after Merry is arrested by the Constable and summarizes the results of the trials: Merry and Rachel are sentenced to death while Williams receives benefit of clergy and is branded. Truth promises to show Merry and Rachel's deaths, as well as the downfall of Fallerio. Enters at the end of the play after the hanging of Merry and Rachel and tells the audience to see in the deaths of Merry, Rachel, Fallerio, and Allenso the consequences of greed. When Homicide and Avarice enter, Truth vows to drive them from the kingdom. After they exit, Truth ends the play by exhorting the audience to resist sin for the good of the country.

TRUTH **1606

An allegorical figure in Dekker's The Whore of Babylon, Time's daughter, she symbolizes the Protestant Religion enslaved by the reign of Mary Tudor. She appears in the dumb show that opens the play as a kind of Andromeda: clothed in black and asleep on a rock with disheveled hair. She is transformed by the funeral of the dead Queen Mariana, wakes up, and reappears crowned and robed to tear the veils from the eyes of the Counselors and to greet the new Fairy Queen, Titania. She and Time present Titania with a book that inspires all those around her to vow to defend Truth forever. She and her father then enjoy driving out the dead Queen Mariana's cardinals and friars, along with their "images, crozier staves, &c." The irate Empress of Babylon later accuses Titania of having stolen Truth's voice and attire. When Titania sends Plain Dealing to dwell with Truth, she proves that she is the real Truth by underlining her own simplicity and wholesomeness; her point is amply proven by the appearance of Falsehood, whose poxy visage cannot be concealed even by Truth's clothing. When the Babylonian Armada advances on Fairyland, Truth and Plain Dealing lead soldiers to Beria against them and help to ensure the final Fairy victory.

TRUTH **1631

A "ghost character" in Zouche's The Sophister. Lady Truth is the mother of Scientia and Opinion. Fallacy attempts to prevent the marriages of her daughters and Judicium claims that "this Morning from Verona come the Ladies, / Whose presence onely is attended here." Topicus claims to have won many victories in rhetoric "under Truths colours" and Fallacy claims to have been "Truths sole soliciter." Fallacy informs Opposition and Contradiction that he has "surpriz'd the Lady Truth, / With her two famous Daughters." Judicium learns that "Truth and her daughters" have been expelled" and Distinction describes to Proposition and Judicium the way he came upon the closet in which was locked "Lord Intellect in one roome, the Lady Truth and her daughters in others" whom he "thence delivered." Fallacy is informed of his captives' escape, and Ambiguity recites to his Master the accusations which he has contrived against Truth and her daughters at Fallacy's command. Amongst them is the claim that, "forgetfull of her honour, mighty Truth, / In base and meane attire hath walkt the streets" and is "with most disgrac't-esteemed hereticks / Conversing alwayes." Ambiguity is arrested of Capital Treason, in part for "those vilde designes" which he and Fallacy have contrived against "those distressed Ladyes / Of poore Verona." At the play's end, Discourse seeks to "make recompence / For those injurious wrongs which harmlesse Truth / And her distressed daughters have sustain'd" and, thus, announces that the marriage of his two sons to Truth's two daughters will soon be celebrated.

TRYMAN, JANE

Jane Tryman is an assumed identity of Jeremy's in Brome's The City Wit. "She" is a prostitute who is in turn disguised as a wealthy but sickly widow. As Jane Tryman, Jeremy schemes with Crasy to fleece his debtors. At the end of the play, Jeremy casts off the disguise and reveals himself.

TRYPHON

Tryphon is Herod's barber in Markham's Herod and Antipater. He is hired by Salumith to claim falsely that the king's younger sons, Alexander and Artisobulus, have paid him to cut the king's throat during shaving. Herod personally kills Tryphon.

TUB

Family name of Lady Tub, Squire Peter Tub, and Squire Tripoly Tub in Jonson's A Tale of A Tub.

TUB, LADY

Squire Tripoly Tub's mother in Jonson's A Tale of A Tub. Her marriage to the late Squire Peter Tub is the source of Squire Tripoly Tub's status. She and her waiting-woman, Dido Wispe, go out to find a poor man to be her Valentine, as a form of charity. She also goes in search of Squire Tripoly Tub, hoping to prevent his marriage to Audrey, whom Lady Tub believes is too low-born for a young Squire. At the Turfe home, they encounter Hannibal Puppy, whom Lady Tub gifts with money and passes on to Dido Wispe as a Valentine. Returning from the Turfe home, she encounters her son, again in possession of Audrey, and insists that her man, Pol-Marten, escort Audrey to Canon Hugh's. Joined by Same Sybil Turfe, they all head to Canon Hugh's, but learn upon discovering John Clay hidden in a barn that Audrey is again vulnerable to abduction. At the Canon's, it is discovered that, taken in by her disguise, Canon Hugh has married Audrey to Pol-Marten. Lady Tub assures the Turfes that Pol-Marten is a gentleman, and hosts the wedding dinner and masque with her son.

TUBAL **1596

Tubal is a Jew and friend of Shylock's in Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice. He tells Shylock that he has not been able to find Jessica, but has had word of her and her extravagant spending. He especially wounds Shylock by telling him that she has traded her mother's ring for a monkey, but Shylock is simultaneously cheered by news of Antonio's losses.

TUBAL **1601

A desert shepherd and suitor to Epimenide in Percy's Arabia Sitiens. Epimenide offers to sleep with him if he brings her Geber's ring, and he swears on the Alcoron (Koran) to complete the task. Steals the ring. He and Caleb meet again near Mecha and share their stories. They encounter Shebe and Nabatha, who are gorgeously dressed for their foretold wedding. When the women tell Caleb and Tubal that Epimenide has gone to Heaven, the men realize they will be unable to keep their sacred vow to bring Geber's possessions to Epimenide. They consult Sergius and he agrees to take the four of them to Heaven. Once there, he presents the ring to Epimenide. She claims it is the wrong ring and dismisses him. Mahomet grants him Nabatha as a wife instead.

TUBER, AURELIUS

A "ghost character" in Marston's What You Will; another suitor of Celia.

TUCAPELO

Disguise adopted by Carionil to attempt to woo Lucora in Cokain's The Obstinate Lady. In this Ethiopian guise, he ingratiates himself with her father, and wins her heart immediately. They arrange to elope, but when she comes to him on the street, he realizes he cannot love a woman who has chosen Tucapelo over him, and cruelly rejects her. When she threatens suicide, he reveals his true identity, and she is immediately cured of her love.

TUCCA, PANTILIUS

I.
Pantilius Tucca is a braggart captain in Jonson's Poetaster. According to Luscus, Tucca is a mad captain who would press everyone he meets with demands for money. Tucca enters Ovid's house following Ovid Senior and Lupus. When Lupus blames the players, who ridicule statesmen on stage, he includes himself and Tucca among those lampooned in the plays. Tucca adds that an honest decayed commander cannot cheat or be seen in a brothel without being the object of ridicule in one of the licentious comedies. Using flattery, Tucca manages to extort some money from Ovid Senior and exits. On the Via Sacra, Tucca enters when Crispinus is on the point of being arrested for debt. Tucca threatens and intimidates Minos, persuading him to be content with a quarter of Crispinus's debt and give everybody a drink. Tucca exits discreetly when he sees Horace and Trebatius, apparently wishing o avoid the lawyer. At Albius'' house, Tucca enters with his host, being introduced by Crispinus. Tucca courts Chloë blatantly and takes Crispinus's part when the poets discover he has plagiarized Horace. Tucca disguised as Mars enters an apartment in the palace, together with the entire party of poets and their ladies, each characteristically dressed as gods and goddesses. All the masks play their assigned roles. During the entertainment presided by Ovid/Jupiter, Tucca/Mars courts Chloë/Venus. When Caesar enters and rails at the ribald party, Tucca makes himself scarce. While Caesar is holding court with the poets, Tucca enters following Lupus, who claims to disclose a plot against Caesar's life. Lupus's gross misrepresentation is exposed and Tucca lays the blame on Aesop, the player-politician. When Lupus and Aesop are chased away in disgrace, Tucca pretends he sustained Lupus against Horace because he wanted to frighten the poet and Maecenas, whom he loved. Caesar orders Tucca gagged and helmeted, in order to keep silent and calumniate no more. Lictors take Tucca away.
II.
Captain Pantilius Tucca is a loud, coarse, and riotous military man who, despite being essentially a "good" character, seems to delight in instigating conflict and disruption in Dekker's Satiromastix. He initially appeared as a character in Ben Jonson's Poetaster, and is considered to be loosely based on a contemporary London personage, Captain Jack Hannam (see Dekker's Induction to the play). In Satiromastix, Tucca first appears in the play at the poet Horace's lodgings, ostensibly to reconcile Horace with his fellow poets Crispinus and Demetrius, although he spends most of his time antagonizing Horace and his companion Asinius Bubo before exacting a pledge of friendship from Horace. The galled Horace determines to revenge himself by satirizing Tucca in epigrams, which he has Bubo circulate among the city gallants. Tucca is also one of the guests celebrating the wedding of Cælestine and Sir Walter Terill. During the party he agrees to deliver love tokens from rival suitors Sir Adam Prickshaft and Sir Vaughan ap Rees to the widow Mistris Miniver, but he uses the opportunity to woo the widow for himself. When Tucca is informed by Crispinus and Demetrius that he has been publicly satirized by Horace, he interrupts Sir Vaughan's party (where Horace is delivering an argument against baldness) to issue a challenge to Bubo for having circulated the epigrams. When Bubo arrives for the duel accompanied by Horace, Tucca is at first unswayed by Horace's promise never to satirize him again, but they eventually reconcile their differences verbally. Horace, however, immediately betrays this new peace by confessing that he will satirize Tucca again at the earliest opportunity. Sir Vaughan then arrives on the scene to challenge Tucca over his mishandling of the monetary love token meant for Mistris Miniver. Tucca convinces Sir Vaughan that all is well, however, and they reconcile amicably. Tucca then informs Sir Vaughan and Horace that Sir Adam has hired Crispinus to deliver a counter-argument defending baldness. Tucca, Horace, and Sir Vaughan crash Sir Adam's party and interrupt Crispinus' defense of baldness, but when Tucca reveals to Sir Vaughan that Horace has hypocritically slandered him behind his back Horace loses the support of his patron and the party turns against him. They determine to subject Horace to a mock trial before the court, during which Tucca rails at him and confronts him with the portraits of the original Roman poet Horace and the character Horace [a portrait of Jonson himself?], pointing out the current Horace's relative shortcomings. Throughout the play, when Tucca is not harassing Horace he is hard at work attempting to seduce Mistris Miniver. Tucca's wooing of the widow Miniver is bawdy and insulting but also apparently effective because Tucca reveals in the final moments of the play that Mistris Miniver has accepted his proposal of marriage, much to the chagrin of her other suitors. Although he admits to abusing the suitors by pretending to woo on their behalf, he offers gamely to return their love tokens. Tucca also delivers the epilogue, in which he offers his wish to part friends with the audience and recants the opinions he professed in Jonson's Poetaster. He also encourages the audience to applaud the play so that Horace (i.e. Jonson) will be spurred to write a rebuttal satire that will provide the audience with more sport.

TUCCA'S BOY

A servant who accompanies Tucca in several scenes in Dekker's Satiromastix. He is with Tucca when Tucca issues his challenge to Asinius Bubo, and by extension Horace, and he helps arm his master in the duel scene. He warns his master to arm himself when he sees Bubo approaching, and warns Tucca that Horace is lurking in the background. Tucca's boy also appears with Tucca in the final scene when Horace and Bubo are led in for their mock trial at court. He carries with him two pictures, one of the character Horace and the other of the original Roman poet Horace; Tucca later uses them to highlight the differences between the original Horace and the "counterfeit" Horace of the play.

TUCK, FRIAR

I.
A "ghost character" in Greene's George a Greene. When Robin orders Scarlet and Much to find bats (staffs) to take with them to seek out George a Greene, Scarlet says he will take Tuck's.
II.
Only mentioned in Peele's Edward I. When the Welsh rebels led by Lluellen take to the mountains, they assume roles derived from the Robin Hood legend. It is natural that Friar Hugh ap David should take the disguise of Friar Tuck, but he qualifies the role by calling himself Friar David ap Tuck.
III.
Only mentioned in Peele's Edward I. When the Welsh rebels led by Lluellen take to the mountains, they assume roles derived from the Robin Hood legend. It is natural that Friar Hugh ap David should take the disguise of Friar Tuck, but he qualifies the role by calling himself Friar David ap Tuck.
IV.
Friar Tuck first enters with Ralph to give Scarlet and Scathlock last confession before they are hanged in (?Chettle and) Munday's Downfall of Robert Earl of Huntington. When Robin Hood rescues them, Tuck tells him he would rather serve Robin than the Prior. He then plots with Jenny to pretend to help Doncaster and the Prior capture Robin, but in fact he warns Robin. When Ely enters the forest in disguise, Tuck recognizes him, and tells Robin rather than keep quiet at Ely's request. He enters to tell Robin that Doncaster and the Prior have been attacked and are wounded. He then, with Scathlock, confronts the disguised Prince John and fights with him, before Marian arrives and recognizes him. Tuck is "played" by Skelton and breaks character twice. The first time is when he breaks into a long Skeltonian verse about overly nice manners, and is reprimanded by Little John/Eltham. He promises to try to control himself and asks Eltham to pull on his sleeve if he starts rhyming again. The second time, Eltham stops to complain that there are no traditional jests or songs in the play, and Skelton defends his creation, saying he is telling the true history of Robin Hood.
V.
Friar Tuck appears first as a sort of chorus in Munday and Chettle's Death of Robert, Earl of Huntington, reminding the audience of the events at the end of The Downfall of Robert, Earl of Huntington. He then enters into the hunt, helping to track the deer that Richard could not bring down. After the hunt, he jokingly demands a forfeit of Richard when the latter address Robin as "Earl Robert" and the King gives him a full purse. After Robin is poisoned, the Friar, with Much, helps drag the Prior before Richard. With Robin's passing and the clearing of the stage, Friar Tuck steps forward to announce the end of the play, but Chester enters and asks the play to continue with Matilda's tragedy. Tuck agrees, and again acts as a chorus, filling in the events, with the aid of dumb show, between Robin's death: Richard I's death and the various early threats during John's reign.

TUCK, SIR OBEDUS **1599

A “ghost character" in Ruggle’s Club Law. Brecknocke reminds the townsfolk that, last year when he was Burgomaster, Sir Obedus Tuck stood bareheaded before him. He tells them that, odious as it may be, they must now do the same before Philenius and Musonius as they present their petition for peace with the students.

TUDITANUS

Tuditanus is one of the Roman Soldiers who, with Lucretius, lays siege to Praeneste and Young Marius in Lodge's The Wounds of Civil War. Tuditanus compares the Praenestian soldiers to tigers or lions.

TUDOR, HENRY

Proper name of the Earl of Richmond in Shakespeare's Richard III.

TULIPA

A "ghost character" in Knevet's Rhodon and Iris. Acanthus announces the advancement of Martagon's army which includes "a furious Amazon cald Tulipa" who "brings on three thousand burley Swiffers."

TULLIA

Tullia is the Princess of Rome and wife to Tarquin in Heywood's The Rape of Lucrece. She longs to be queen and plans with her husband to kill her own father, Servius. After his death, she tramples his body under foot and rides a chariot over his corpse. Her husband calls her unkind but does not stop her. Once her husband is made king, she councils him to maintain his position through fear. When Tarquin is wounded by an arrow, he asks that Tullia take horse and live to fight another day. She stands by her man as Collatine, Lucretius and Mutius Scevola close on them. Both Tarquin and Tullia are killed. Brutus covered in blood vows that they will not be buried, an act that is in stark contrast to Tarquin's decorous burial of Servius. The bodies of the King and Queen and Aruns are displayed to weaken the resolve of Sextus and his remaining troops.

TULLIE

See also TULLIUS, TULLY, and CICERO.

TULLIE

Only mentioned in [?]Heywood's The Fair Maid of the Exchange. Bowdler likens the sharp-tongued and keen-witted Mall Berry to the famous Roman orator and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero.

TULLIUS

See also TULLY, TULLIE, and CICERO.

TULLIUS

Tullius is the hero in the Anonymous The Faithful Friends. The youthful favorite of the emperor, Martius, he has aroused the enmity of the soldier-courtiers Rufinus, Leonatus, and Learchus, especially when Martius appoints him general of the army sent to subdue the rebellious Sabines. The promotion leaves unconsummated his marriage to Philadelpha. He goes to war accompanied by his sister, Laelia, disguised as Philadelpha's page, Janus, and by his friend Marius, leaving another friend, Armanus, to look after Philadelpha. For all his inexperience, he conducts the campaign so well that he has the Sabines on the verge of defeat when he receives an unsigned letter from Rufinus accusing Philadepha of infidelity and Armanus of complicity in her betrayal. He asks Marius to assume his identity and carry on the war, and sets off for Rome. On the way, he meets Armanus, and is persuaded that the accusations in the letter are false. When the two also meet up with Marius, who has miraculously escaped the murderous trap set for Tullius by Rufinus, and with the equally faithful Laelia, the friends return to Rome, where they gain access to the birthday celebration at which Martius hopes to succeed in his assault on Philadelpha' virtue by disguising themselves as masquers. Once inside, they are able to forestall Martius' scheme, shame him, and reveal the plots of Rufinus. Tullius, Philadelpha, and the other friends end the play in joy and mutual love.

TULLIUS **1636

Disguised pirate of Silvander’s party in Killigrew’s Claricilla. A Rhodian captain who took pity on Manlius and rescued him. When a slave attempts to stab him, he has the slave executed as an example to all. Hearing noise in the woods, he goes wake Manlius, but Philemon prevents him. He later fights Philemon and is defeated. Philemon, Melintus, and Manlius take him to the galley to have his wounds tended.

TULLIUS **1636

Humorous companion of Terresius and his lieutenant in Killigrew’s The Princess. When he dies, the captain of the pirate band inherits his wealth. Since learning he must die, he has turned profligate. He assures the lieutenant and Terresius that he is dying as fast as he can. When drunk, however, he thinks he must be immortal. He appears at the galley as the lieutenant and soldiers are planning mutiny against Terresius and joins them. He is wounded in the fight with Facertes and Virgilius but comes across the more seriously wounded lieutenant and taunts him as he once taunted Tullius. The lieutenant promises to make Tullius his heir if Tullius will get him to a surgeon. Instead, Tullius begins to strip him and, when he hears a noise, drags the lieutenant away to cut his throat.

TULLIUS CICERO, MARCUS

I.
Marcus Tullius Cicero is a consul in republican Rome in Jonson's Catiline. He is a forceful speaker whose eloquence has raised him to the highest office in the Roman republic, the consulship. Cicero enters the Roman Senate with the other senators, delivering his address of gratitude for having been elected consul, despite his humble origin. It is inferred that word had transpired about Catiline's plot to become consul, and the citizens elected Marcus Antonius and Cicero instead of Catiline. At Fulvia's house, Cicero persuades Fulvia and Curius to spy for him in Catiline's party. Concurrently, Cicero sends his brother for Caius Antonius, whom he wants to bribe with a rich province in order to prevent him from siding with Catiline. At his house, Cicero enters with Fulvia and his brother. Fulvia has warned him about Catiline's plot of assassination, and Cicero sends for his trusted friends and clients to act as witnesses for him. Cicero confronts the conspirators sent to murder him with their guilt in front of witnesses, inviting them to repent, but the attempting murderers steal away. In the Senate, Cicero addresses his discourse against Catiline, indicting him for the conspiracy. Since Catiline denies the allegations and goes to exile, Cicero sets out to obtain material proof against the conspirators. Having been informed that Catiline's allies intended to enroll Allobroges in their party, Cicero instructs the ambassadors to request letters explaining their designs. The praetors intercept the incriminating letters and thus Cicero is able to bring proof of the conspiracy before the Senate. Since the conspirators deny all evidence, they are placed in private custody. When reports come that the conspirators continued their seditious actions, Cicero summons the Senate urgently and the death sentence is pronounced. Cicero is awarded the Civic Garland for services rendered to the nation. Cicero has the final oration in the Senate, thanking the gods for having given him the opportunity to save Rome.
II.
Only mentioned in the anonymous 1 Return From Parnassus. Marcus Tullius Cicero is repeatedly invoked as the fountainhead of elegant Latin.

TULLIUS, KING

Only mentioned in Lodge's The Wounds of Civil War. Tullius was the sixth king of Rome. Octavius refers to his law that the best and aged men will be the ones to decide on the ruler of Rome, causing the beginnings of a battle between the young and old citizens. When Scilla is first declared Dictator of Rome, Octavius promises the Senate that he will uphold King Tullius' laws.

TULLIUS SENIOR

A "ghost character" in the Anonymous The Faithful Friends. Old Tullius has died before the play begins, but is several times remembered for his stern integrity and for his feud with the father of Marius that has prevented Marius' union with Old Tullius' daughter, Laelia.

TULLY

See also TULLIE, TULLIUS, and CICERO.

TULLY

I.
The famous Roman orator Marcus Tullius Cicero, or Tully, the name that he claims to prefer, has a dilemma in Machin's(?) Every Woman in Her Humour. He is in love with Terentia, a senator's daughter who is not only out of his reach but also the beloved of his friend Lentulus. Tully is so devoted to Lentulus that he agrees to woo Terentia on his friend's behalf. But all of his rhetorical ability is useless in this case: Tully cannot persuade Terentia to love Lentulus because Terentia is in love with Tully. She convinces Tully that his low birth is of no matter; she loves him for his virtue and learning. Unfortunately, Terentia's father, Flaminius, is not at all pleased with the match that his daughter has made for herself, and he promises to take the matter to the Senate and the Emperor if necessary. Tully's chief worry is that he has betrayed his friend; however, Lentulus is quick to accept the couple and to propose to Flavia instead. The four solemnize their vows in a double ceremony at which the Emperor is in attendance.
II.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Vincent was mentioned by Master Silence when he is offering Master Ominous a solution to put an end to his misfortunes: "Then throw away Tully, De divinatione, that heathen lawyer, ay, and De Dis Syris too." Marcus Tullius Cicero attacked divination in De divinatione (44 B. C.). De Dis Syris–Concerning Wealthy Syria–was written by John Selden (1584-1654). Tully is later mentioned by Sir Cupid Phantsy when he is explaining to Doctor Clyster that "love's language is the finest language", he adds "Tullys spoke them." 'Tullys' is used here as an extensive name for 'Ciceroes', referring to poets in general. Marcus Tullius Cicero (c. 106-43 B. C.) was an accomplished poet, a forensic orator, lawyer, politician, and philosopher. He was an important actor in many of the significant political events of his time, which coincided with the decline and fall of the Roman Republic.
III.
Only mentioned in Shirley's The Witty Fair One. Marcus Tullius Cicero, or Tully, was a first century BCE Roman scholar who wrote books of rhetoric and oratory. Fowler refers to Tully while pretending to be ill.

TURBULENZO, CARLO

A "ghost character" in Middleton's The Phoenix. Carlo Turbulenzo does not appear in the play but is described as a party who failed to appear in the prosecution of a lawsuit.

TURFE

Family name of Tobie, Sybil, and Audrey in Jonson's A Tale of A Tub.

TURGESIUS

Turgesius is the son of the king of Norway in Shirley's The Politician. Gotharius has urged the king to send Turgesius to war, hoping that the prince would be killed. Turgesius returns victorious, however, only to find himself betrayed by Gotharius, who sends the king forged letters in which Turgesius supposedly speaks treason and a hearty disdain for Marpisa. Turgesius is shot and believed dead; his coffin rests in Olaus' house. The prince lives, though, and reveals himself at the play's end when Gotharius' treachery becomes plain to all.

TURK **1599

Only mentioned in Jonson's Every Man out of His Humour. Turk is the generic name given to the Turkish Sultan in Constantinople. Puntavorlo announces he intends to embark on a journey to the East accompanied by his wife, later replaced by Cat, and his Dog. The party is supposed to reach the Turk's court in Constantinople and return safely in a year's time.

TURK **1609

Only mentioned in Jonson's Epicoene. In the discussion between Morose and Mute, when it comes to the use of mutes as servants, the Ottoman Sultan, also named the Turk, is brought as an example. Since Morose hates all noise, he tries to instruct his servant, aptly named Mute, in the skill of communicating through sign language. Morose says that the Turk is to be admired for his employment of mute servants. According to Morose, he heard that, during his marches, the Sultan gives his directions by signs. Morose commends this habit as an exquisite art, deploring the princes of Christendom, who can let a barbarian transcend them in so high a point of felicity. The irony addresses Morose's noise-hating idiosyncrasy.

TURK **1610

Only mentioned in Jonson's The Alchemist. Dapper wants to win Subtle's confidence, because the alchemist is wary of him because of the case of a clerk had recently denounced a magician. Dapper says that he is no chiaus. The word means a Turkish go-between, and Dapper says he is no Turk. The implication is that he is unable to betray someone, as an infidel would.

TURK **1624

This Turk is servant to Antonio in Davenport's The City Night Cap. In Act Four, he kicks Philippo out of the bawd house. Later, he comes back to see him again and the slave is killed by Philippo.

TURK **1642

At the end of Salusbury’s Love or Money, Nano appears at Mendoso’s wedding disguised in a floor-length Turkish gown complete with turban.

TURK GREGORY

Only mentioned in Shakespeare's 1 Henry IV. Turk Gregory is the term used by Falstaff to refer to Pope Gregory VII and his valor.

TURKILLUS

Saxon, in the first scene a follower of Canute, but he thinks that Ironside is the true king in the Anonymous Edmond Ironside. Together with Leofricke he changes sides, although their eldest sons remain as pledges in Canute's hands. As a result of their fathers' treason, the sons have their noses and hands cut off. At the end of the play Turkillus and Leofricke swear revenge.

TURKISH BASHAWS, TWO

Mirza takes the bashaws prisoner in Denham's The Sophy. He treats them with honour and asks his father, King Abbas, to allow them a military command,. Abbas's favourite, Haly, uses this request to exacerbate the King's suspicion and jealousy of his son. Realizing the prince's danger, the bashaws, now devotedly loyal to him, offer their lives to Abbas to confirm his innocence. Their offer finally explodes Haly's deceit, and he tells Abbas the truth: that Mirza was never plotting against him. Haly then has the bashaws taken off for execution.

TURKISH CAPTAIN

A Turkish captain in Heywood's A Challenge for Beauty first captures and then sells Ferrars, Manhurst, and their crew as slaves in Spain.

TURKS **1607

Four Turkish islanders, who capture Thomas Sherley Jr in Day, Rowley and Wilkins's The Travels of the Three English Brothers.

TURKS **1610

Notably the participants in the dumbshow in Daborne's A Christian Turned Turk depicting the ceremonies of Ward's conversion. They appear in procession, two to carry crescent moon symbols of Islam, a third carrying 'a Mahomet's head'. Two priests escorting the Mufti, others presenting Ward with a turban, robes and sword, displaying a globe and arrow and two knights as escort.

TURNER, JOHN

Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Turner is mentioned by Signor Jealousia when, inquired by Doctor Clyster whether he had been a striker when he was a bachelor, Jealousia replies: "Indeed I did use the stock sometimes, Turner's stock." John Turner was a famous fencing master who kept a school in Whitefriars. He was said to have developed considerable skill in dispatching adversaries with thrusts to the eye. He was murdered by several assassins paid by Robert Creighton, Baron of Sanquire (or Sanchar) in 1612.

TURNOP

Turnop is the leader of the company of amateur actors in Munday's John a Kent and John a Cumber. They come to entertain the lords on the night before the wedding day. The actors debate which of them should deliver the welcoming speech. They vote, with a little help from Turnop's rhetoric, that Turnop is best suited to recite the part. According to Tom, Turnop is Chester's man therefore most fit to speak before the gentlemen. Hugh says Turnop has a little learning, exemplified by his Latin "sophistication," and that he has borrowed the usher's coat to look more suitable to task. Turnop introduces the dumb pageant representing Moorton and Pembrooke's names. During the night, the amateur actors rehearse their song dedicated to the ladies in front of the house where the bridegrooms are lodged. Using his pompous rhetoric, Turnop says the fair Sydanen has inspired the song he composed. When Shrimp replaces Will's song with his song about the ladies' escape, thus waking the lords, the clowns are accused of being involved in the ladies' disappearance. Chester sends the clowns and his servants in search of the ladies. At Gosselin's castle, John a Cumber discusses with the actors the play they are going to act before the lords. This play is intended to be a mockery of John a Kent, with John a Cumber playing John a Kent. Yet, the actors arrive after the play is enacted with the real characters acting as themselves, and after John a Cumber is humiliated in the disguise of John a Kent. The actors see the person whom they think to be John a Kent (actually John a Cumber in disguise) and vent their abuse upon him, as they were taught by John a Cumber. After they perform this last act of humiliation at John a Cumber's expense, the actors exit to do their daily jobs.

TURNUS **1591

A "ghost character" in the Anonymous Locrine. He was one of Brutus' followers who slew six hundred men at arms in an hour and died in the battle against Goffarius and Gathelius.

TURNUS **1600

Chief aide in Thomas Heywood's The Four Prentices of London to the Sophy of Persia.

TURNUS **1607

A "ghost character" in Heywood's The Rape of Lucrece. One of Lucrece's maids states that Lord Turnus has sent a servant on repeated occasions to invite Lucrece to dine with him. She has repeatedly declined the invitation because, she says, good wives shouldn't go out of the house when their husbands are away.

TURPIN

Fights Orlando on behalf of the Twelve Peers of France in Greene's Orlando Furioso.

TURPIN, BISHOP

Bishop Turpin is a counselor to the Emperor Charlemagne in the Anonymous Charlemagne. After the death of Theodora, he finds the ring under her tongue and discovers that this was the cause of Charlemagne's obsessive love for her. The bishop himself becomes the object of the Charlemagne's affections while he holds the ring, but he tries to use it to heal division in the court; he returns the ring to Charlemagne so that the Emperor cannot be controlled by any of his subjects.

TURQUALO

Lord of Padua in Yarington's Two Lamentable Tragedies. Enters from the hunt with the Duke, Vesuvio, Alberto, and attendants just after Pertillo's murder. They discover Allenso wandering lost in the woods and he asks them to direct him back to Padua. They then discover the bodies of Pertillo and the first Ruffian, along with the wounded second Ruffian. Turqualo exits with the Duke and his party to pursue Fallerio. At the end of the play, along with the other lords, Turqualo brings the disguised Allenso to the Duke and observes as both Allenso and then Fallerio remove their disguises and are ordered hanged by the Duke.

TUSCAN MERCHANTS

Do not appear in the play. They corrupt Thomas Sherley Jr's crew and encourage them to mutiny in Day, Rowley and Wilkins's The Travels of the Three English Brothers.

TUTCH

Tutch is the clown in Armin's The Two Maids of More–Clacke. He checks if everything is alright for the banquet of the wedding. Later, in the music performance, he brings a letter from Filbon to Tabisha which annoys her father. He comes back to his master and informs Filbon that Tabisha will be faithful to him. To see her, he will get dresses as his master while Filbon will be his servant.

TUTCHIN, JUSTICE

Justice Tutchin is the brother of Lady Sommerfield and the uncle of Constantia Sommerfield in Barry's Ram Alley. Sir Oliver Smallshanks tells him that William has "stolen" Constantia. They are amused by the behavior of Captain Face; when he sees them he threatens Sir Oliver, warning him to stay away from Changeable Taffeta. Tutchin accompanies Sir Oliver to Taffeta's house, and tries to advise him in his wooing. He is called to Lady Sommerfield's London house and, after dining with Taffeta, goes to Lady Sommerfield to tell her the news that William has possession of Constantia. He offers to have William arrested, and attends Lady Sommerfield during the visit of Throat. Throat claims to have married Constantia, and Justice Tutchin arrests him for felony. When Beard brings the news of the capture of "Constantia"—really the courtesan Francis impersonating Constantia—Tutchin has him arrested too.

TUTOR **1591

When in Shakespeare's 3 Henry VI Lord Clifford arrives to avenge his father's death by killing the Duke of York's youngest son, Rutland, Rutland's tutor attempts to persuade Clifford to be merciful. Neither the tutor's persuasions nor Rutland's pleas divert Clifford from his aim.

TUTOR **1611

Tim's tutor in Middleton's A Chaste Maid in Cheapside accompanies him to the Allwit's to witness the christening.

TUTOR **1617

The tutor to Lamprias in the comic subplot of Fletcher's Queen of Corinth, this thin and pedantic wretch is somewhat more sympathetic to his young/old charge than is Lamprias' uncle. He boasts of having trained up a true gentleman, and joins with Lamprias in mocking Euphanes. Nevertheless, he too is cowed when the foolish trio of nephew, uncle and tutor are bested by Euphanes' page and satirically dubbed "knights of the pantofle" by the youth of the court. He counsels another thirty years' travel as a cure for the humiliation attendant on this experience.

TUTOR **1628

As companion to Treedle in Shirley's The Witty Fair One, the Tutor's job is to quiz Treedle on matters of travel that Treedle has learned by book rather than through experience. He hopes to win Treedle's betrothed for himself and in that hope attacks Brains, Violetta's escort. He believes Treedle is "an ass" and lives to prove himself equally worthy of that title.

TUTOR, CRICKET’S **1599

A “ghost character" in Ruggle’s Club Law. He had a large dictionary but sold it and kept the money. Because of this, Cricket may not sell his own dictionary as the Tutor needs it. Cricket later confides to the audience that he’s stolen the Scots dagger he envied from his Tutor.

‘TWAIN MARRIED’

’Ghost’ and possibly ‘fantasy’ characters in Medwall’s Fulgens and Lucrece. The character B relates to Joan, whom he desires to marry though he is currently poor, that he knew of ‘twain married’ who were not worth ‘a louse’ but, by year’s end, were worth one or two hundred and owned a house. Joan retorts that she knew such a couple herself who had not so much as half a bed each but, within a year or two, were so ‘increased’ (by pregnancies) that they had to sleep on straw.

TWEEDLE, TIMOTHY **1600

A piper and friend (side-kick) of Jack Drum in Marston's Jack Drum's Entertainment. Tweedle brags about his expertise with the pipe and with women, but it isn't clear whether he means his pipe attracts women or women are attracted by his sexual prowess. Whenever Drum appears in the play, Tweedle is usually with him–he too is at the final festivities.

TWEEDLES, THOMASINE

A fictional character invented by Gerardine in Middleton's The Family of Love. Tweedles is supposedly a mistress of Glister's who has born him a bastard son.

TWILIGHT

Family name of Sir Oliver and Lady Twilight and their children Philip and supposedly Grace, but actually Jane in Middleton's No Wit, No Help Like a Woman's.

TWILIGHT, LADY

The wife of the wealthy gentleman Sir Oliver Twilight in Middleton's No Wit, No Help Like a Woman's. She is believed by both her husband and son to be dead as the play opens, a rumor that Savorwit attempts to perpetuate through a conversation with the Dutch Merchant's boy. Lady Twilight's sudden appearance quells this rumor and marks her jubilant reunion with her son, Philip. The Dutch Merchant informs mother and son (falsely) that Grace is Twilight's daughter, a fact allegedly confirmed when Lady Twilight interrogates Grace herself. Because Grace and Philip had been married clandestinely in Antwerp two months previously, the family prepares for the humiliation that will attend the fact that Philip has, in fact, married his sister. The scandal is averted, however, when Goldenfleece reveals at her wedding feast that Grace is actually Sunset's daughter and it is Jane who is, in fact, Twilight's.

TWIST, TOM

Tom Twist is the name assumed by the disguised Sir Thomas Sellinger in Thomas Heywood's 1 Edward IV when he visits the home of Hobs the Tanner with the also-disguised King Edward.

TYB

See also TIB.

TYB **1520

Tyb is the shrewish wife of Johan Johan in J. Heywood's Johan Johan, the Husband; Tyb, His Wife; and Sir Johan, the Priest. By verbal skill (and sometimes the threat of physical violence), she is able to cow the meek and submissive Johan Johan. She even makes him complicit in her adulterous liaison with the local priest Sir Johan, by sending her husband to invite the cleric to a dinner that only she and the priest will share.

TYB **1553

Gammer's maid in [?]Stevenson's Gammer Gurton's Needle. She tells Hodge that Gammer Gurton's needle is missing. She looks in vain through the dustbins for the needle.

TYBALT

See also "TIBALT."

TYBALT

A young man of Verona and nephew to Capulet in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. Tybalt's hatred for the Montagues is extreme; when he recognizes Romeo at the Capulet feast, he tries to challenge him but is restrained by his uncle. Nevertheless he seeks out Romeo the next day and confronts him. Tybalt slays Mercutio and is then slain by Romeo. Tybalt's death leads the Prince to banish Romeo from Verona.

TYBERT

The given name of Joshua's cat in Sampson's The Vow-Breaker, used by Joshua when he indicts her for killing a mouse on a Sunday.

TYCHO BRAHE

Only mentioned in the anonymous Wit's Triumvirate. Tycho Brahe is mentioned by Doctor Clyster when, having heard Master Algebra's claim that "the earth moves and that the sun stands still", he replies "Sir, this was a drunken conceit of Copernicus the German and Tycho Brahe the Dane." Later, Copernicus is mentioned by Doctor Clyster again, when he offers Master Algebra a cure for his disease: "I shall beseech you not to taste Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, or Kepler, but especially Galileo." Tycho Brahe (1546-1601) was a brilliant astronomer and scientist. He supported the theory that the earth remained fixed in the center of the universe, and that the moon and the sun circulated around it. He also added that the rest of the planets circulated around the sun.

TYDEUS

A "ghost character" in Gascoigne and Kinwelmershe's Jocasta. By fighting Tydeus outside the walls of Argos, Polynice attracted the notice of Adrastus; each of the combatants marries one of the King's daughters.

TYDIDES

Only mentioned in Jonson's The New Inn. When Lovel praises the noble education he received from Lord Beaufort, he distinguishes between the teaching of frivolous courtly manners and the profound righteousness inherited from the great classical epitomes of morality. Lovel illustrates the two types of education with examples from chivalric romance and classical antiquity. In contrast with the superficial courtly manners disseminated by the contacts with chivalric romance, Lovel says that his master taught him the moral strength of the classical heroes, among whom he mentions Tydides, remarkable for his fortitude. It is inferred that Tydides' bravery is an example of determined action and manly conduct. The youngest of the Achaean commanders in the Iliad, Diomedes (also called Tydides) is bold and sometimes proves impetuous. After Achilles withdraws from combat, Athena inspires Diomedes with such courage that he actually wounds two gods. Lovel uses the name Tydides eulogistically.

TYDY

A cousin of Sir Charles Mountford, who refuses Susan's plea for financial help in Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness.

TYE, DOCTOR **1604

Prince Edward’s music teacher in Rowley’s When You See Me. Henry bids Cranmer to encourage Tye to teach the prince music. His music instruction fills his scene with loud music, soft music, and a song.

TYLER, WAT

I.
Tyler joins the group of commoners who plans to confront the aristocracy and take over their powers in the anonymous Jack Straw. He advocates immediate action while they have momentum, and prods Strawe to confront King Richard II in London. Tyler tells King Richard II that commoners are as worthy as nobility to receive the king's favors and, perhaps because of his outspokenness, is one of two members of the group to be hanged (Ball being the other). Before his death, he reminds Morton that Tyler saved Morton from some unspecified difficulty at Rochester Castell. He maintains his sense of humor throughout.
II.
A "ghost character" in Thomas Heywood's 1 Edward IV, (Wat?) Tyler is mentioned by Falconbridge in his oratory as a rascal who rose up against a monarch over a trifle.

TYLER, TOM

Tom Tyler is a poor laborer in the anonymous Tom Tyler And His Wife who has married Strife, the woman Desire found him. He enters singing a song about his woes, and talks to the audience about them. Rather than being the sheep he had imagined, she turns out to be a shrew. No matter what he does he cannot make her happy. When Strife and her friends are drinking at the pub, he comes in for a beer; Strife beats him and chases him off. Alone he talks of the pleasures of his job as a Tyler, his only problem in life being his dreadful wife. He contrasts his life with that of his friend Tom Tayler whose heart is at ease. He asks Tom to make his wife's life miserable. Tayler borrows Tom Tyler's clothes so that he can disguise himself. After cudgeling Strife, Tayler tells Tyler what he has done and the two men sing a song of celebration about controlling a mare. Tom Tyler enters next in Strife's bedroom and sees her sick. When she bewails his unjust treatment of her, Tom Tyler justifies his actions and explains that it was the disguised Tom Tayler who had beaten her. At this Strife recovers her strength and beats him severely, demanding he go down on his knee to her. Tipple and Strife enter to stop further violence and help Tom Tyler escape. At the end Destiny speaks to him, pointing out that people simply have to put up with whatever end they come to; Destiny can do nothing about it. If Tom accepts the truth of this, nothing will cause him grief. He accepts that he just has to put up with what fortune sends him.

TYMETHES

The son of the King of Lydia in T.D.'s The Bloody Banquet. In Act One, Tymethes seems more interested in pursuing the daughter of the usurping King, Armatrites, than with assisting his dethroned Father. Later, he is awed by the Queen of Cicilia, whose movements are restricted by her uxorious husband, Armatrites. In Act Two, the disguised Queen's Keeper, Roxona, seduces Tymethes into agreeing to meet an unknown woman, highlighting Tymethes' lack of self-discipline. In Act Three, he allows himself to be led by the hand, blindfolded, by Roxona into the meeting with the enigmatic lady (whom the audience knows to be the Cicilian Queen). He accidentally spills some wine, which is fortunate as it has been poisoned by Roxona, who has been bribed by Mazeres. Tymethes is mesmerized by the lush surroundings, sweet foods, and service at the banquet, although the prized woman remains veiled. In Act Four, he reveals to Zenarchus the story of his experiences at the banquet; he also reveals that he has surreptitiously removed a ring from the hidden lady's finger. He reluctantly gives the ring to a demanding Amphrodite. Again, he is brought hoodwinked to see the Queen. He realises who she is: fearing for her own life, she kills him with a pistol. His body is dragged off stage and quartered at Armatrites' command. The body parts are, for now, displayed to the Queen. In Act Five, Tymethes' flesh is publicly eaten by the punished Queen.

TYNDAR

A parasite in Porrex's court in Sackville and Norton's Gorboduc. He is quick to blame Gorboduc for having divided the realm in the first place.

TYNDARUS**1611

I.
A "ghost character" in Heywood's Brazen Age. Tyndarus of Lada is father to Castor, Pollux and Helen.
II.
A "ghost character", in Heywood's 1 The Iron Age Tyndareus (called Tendarus in the text) is Helen's human step-father. Menelaus tries to shame Helen into returning to Sparta by mentioning that she has deserted Tyndareus just as she has her mother Leda and her daughter Hermione.
III.
Clytemnestra’s father in Goffe’s Orestes. He learns the gossip from Mysander that Agamemnon died of old age, that Orestes has killed himself, and Aegystheus means to assume the throne. He plans to attend his daughter’s wedding to Aegystheus. He says, “Her hasty wedding and the old king’s neglect makes my conjectural soul some ill suspect." When he eulogizes Agamemnon at the wedding feast, Aegytheus stops him. He disowns Orestes when the murders are revealed. He banishes Strophius and Electra from court. He orders that none give Orestes food or shelter in his banishment. He is moved by the lords’ plea to have mercy on the mad prince but arrives to find he and Pylades have mercifully killed one another. He delivers the final lines, saying it is vain to believe we can control our fates. He orders the two friends to be buried in one grave.

TYNDARUS **1632

One of the two title characters in Randolph's Jealous Lovers. He is Demetrius' son and the supposed brother of Pamphilus. He is jealously enamoured of Evadne. He vacillates between trusting her virtue and suspecting it throughout the play. When Asotus shows him her stolen earring and claims to have bedded her, Tyndarus believes him, and they form an alliance to turn libertine. When Asotus repents and admits to having stolen the earring, Tyndarus and Evadne are reconciled. Still uncertain of her, Tyndarus sends his brother Pamphilus to tempt and test her faith. Techmessa witnesses Pamphilus and Evadne's mutual testing of one another and tells Tyndarus that both are false upon which news Tyndarus rejects Pamphilus as a treacherous brother. He is on the point of killing Pamphilus when Chremylus intervenes to prevent him. The truth of the testing is revealed, and it is further revealed that Dipsas is behind it all. She tells Tyndarus that she lusted after him herself but now repents and sends Tyndarus to meet Evadne at Ballio's house. Tyndarus is suspicious of her motivations, however, and goes in disguise. When he first sees Evadne in the bawdyhouse, Tyndarus again suspects her virtue, but he soon recognizes her danger and rescues her. Still disguised, he pretends to make a ravishment of her, but when she threatens to kill herself, his doubts in her are again for the moment quelled. But when Pamphilus arrives, Tyndarus concludes that this was to be their trysting place and that Evadne had seen through his disguise and only pretended virginal modesty. In a jealous rage, he leaves her there. He finally goes to Techmessa and agrees with her to test their lovers by pretending suicide. He bribes Asotus and Ballio to spread the rumor of their deaths. He and Techmessa are brought in coffins to the church, and he rises out of it only when the Sexton is about to rob his "corpse." When the Sexton faints, he disguises as the Sexton and places him in the coffin. As the Sexton, he learns that Ballio intends to have him buried indeed in order to inherit his estate. He next witnesses Evadne attempt suicide over his coffin and (still disguised) prevents her. He also prevents Dipsas' suicide before revealing himself to them. He goes to wed Evadne but is again made to suspect her virtue when the statue of Hymen turns its back to their nuptials. Demetrius appears and reveals that Tyndarus is in reality Clinias, Evadne's brother, and so he marries Techmessa instead. He realizes that all of his jealousies were Nature's way of preventing his incestuous marriage to Evadne. When the Sexton and Staphyla speak from the coffins, forbidding the banns between Asotus and Phryne, Tyndarus reminds them of how they attempted to rob his "corpse" and forces them to drop their objections to the marriage. His final act is to pardon Ballio and accept Asotus' invitation to his wedding feast.

TYPHON

A "ghost character" in Heywood's The Silver Age; Pluto describes how the struggles of this giant, buried alive by Jupiter under ranges of mountains, explain earthquakes.

TYRANT **1606

A "ghost character" in Dekker's The Whore of Babylon. As Paridel is deliberating about killing her, Titania receives a letter describing the death of a tyrant who, unable to sleep, ran mad and died, a death Titania views as very just. Since all of the three Kings reappear after she receives this report, this Tyrant's identity remains unclear.

TYRANT **1611

The Tyrant is in love with the Lady in [?]Middleton's The Second Maiden's Tragedy, but she loves King Govianus. So the Tyrant usurps Govianus, and is supported by all the court Nobles. He is disappointed when the Lady refuses to leave Govianus, but cannot bring himself to force her. He therefore banishes the couple to a guarded house, keeping them in separate rooms to increase their misery. When all attempts at persuasion fail, he orders the house to be attacked and the Lady seized, but she kills herself and Govianus buries her in his family tomb. The tyrant sets Govianus free in the hope that he will leave the country. Then, he breaks into the Lady's tomb and exhumes her corpse. He takes her to the throne room and dresses her up in fine clothes. Then he hires a painter to paint her face as if she were alive. But the painter is Govianus in disguise, and he paints her face with poison. The Tyrant kisses her face and is poisoned. The Ghost of the Lady and Govianus triumph as he dies.

TYRANT THRIFT, SIR

Lady Ample's guardian in Davenant's The Wits. He plans to marry her off against her will before his guardianship expires. Instead, he is pleased to find that she is apparently dying, leaving him her entire fortune. He demonstrates his heartlessness by his plans to bury her cheaply. This is, of course, another of Lady Ample's tricks, and his greedy schemes are foiled.

TYRANNY

Tyranny, along with Ambition and Pride, is one of the invading Spanish lords in Wilson's The Three Lords and Three Ladies of London. He calls himself 'Government.' His shield bears the image of "a naked child on a spear's point bleeding." He hopes to claim Conscience for his prize. When the lords of London attack, the Spaniards "suddenly depart." The lords of London hang up their shields and hide to see what the Spaniards do. The Spaniards return and "flourish their rapiers" but do not dare to touch the shields. They then hang up their own. The lords of London take their own shields and batter those of the Spaniards. The Spaniards "do suddenly slip away and come no more."

TYRE–MAN **1600

The "tiring house" man in Marston's Jack Drum's Entertainment: a kind of stage manager. This character announces in the "Introduction" to the play, that he is presenting "John Drum's entertainment," but there's a problem backstage because the author of the play is trying to keep the actors (or boys) from coming on stage. The Tyre-man apologizes to the audience in advance for any problems.

TYRESIAS

See also TIERESIAS.

TYRESIAS

Tyresias is a sage duke and a blind prophet in the anonymous Narcissus. As he is travelling, he arrives at the place where Cephisus, Lyriope and Narcissus have been waiting for him for some time. He explains he was turned blind by Juno when he foretold that she and Jove were going to fall out–which happened indeed. Then he was also turned into a woman for seven years. When he finishes his account, he is asked by Cephisus to tell him his son's fortune. Tyresias reads the child's hand and explains that his line of life is too brief, concluding that he can only make out "dolefull dumpes, decay, death and destruction." At Lyriope's asking him for a way to prevent that from happening, he answers her with the enigmatic words: 'If he does not discover himself.' Later, he continues his way, and he meets Dorastus and Clinias. They also want to know their fate, and he reveals that they will die soon. According to Ovid's Metamorphoses, Tiresias was a blind seer from Thebes. His story starts when, one day, he separated two mating snakes which, in their turn, punished him, magically transforming him into a woman. He had to stay like that for seven years, until he tried to separate other two snakes, to see if the enchantment was reversed, and it worked. His story caught the attention of Juno and Jupiter, who where contending over the relative happiness of man and woman, and decided to refer the matter to Tiresias, for his having experienced both conditions. Tiresias had to favor Jupiter, affirming that the pleasure women derived was greater. Incensed, Juno made Tiresias blind, but Jupiter, gratified, bestowed him with the power of seeing the future.

TYRINTHUS

The father of Perindus and Olinda in P. Fletcher's Sicelides. Tyrinthus enters with Gryphus near the play's end and begins to inquire about the well-being of his children. He sends Gryphus back to their ship to "fetch [. . .] the vestments vowd to Neptune, and the chest" in which he has locked his "other offerings." Tyrinthus claims that he was taken years before "by Persians on the Gracian seas," reveals some details about where he has spent the past "thrice five summers," and brings to mind the "two infants" (and their deceased mother) whom he had left behind when he took to the sea. He promises to reward Neptune with riches after he has seen his children, but is informed shortly after by Pas that Olinda is dead–at which news Tyrinthus is so distressed that "he falls." Thus, grief-stricken over his daughter's death, Tyrinthus presses Pas for more details which the Fisher (unaware of their falseness) reveals to him. When informed that his friend, Dicaus, still lives and that Pas had left Perindus only "two houres since, sad [. . .] but safe," Tyrinthus is somewhat comforted. He is reunited with Scrocca and Cancrone only to find out that his son is "doom'd to die," and sets out immediately for "the shore" to find him. However, at the play's end, Tyrinthus is reunited with both of his children.

TYRRELL, SIR JAMES

Supporter of Richard III in Shakespeare's Richard III. Richard hires Tyrrell to murder Prince Edward and Prince Richard. Tyrrell orders his servant Dighton, along with Forrest, to commit the murders. See also TIRIL, TERRELL, and related spellings.

TYSEFEW

Tysefew is a friend of the Freevill family in Marston's Dutch Courtesan. He dances in Young Freevill's pre-wedding masque, and he woos and wins Crispinella. The dramatis personae describes him as a "bold gallant," and the evidence that his wit will make him a suitable match for Crispinella is shown in their many flyting matches (which he always loses, but just barely) and the ease with which he shows off the shortcomings of his rival Caqueteur.

TYSIPHONE

See also TISIPHONE.

TYSIPHONE

I.
The non-speaking furies in Peele's The Battle of Alcazar–Alecto, Megaera, and Tysiphone–are summoned by Nemesis to cry, conspire, complain and moan until Abdelmunen's grieved ghost gains revenge for his murder.
II.
Only mentioned in the anonymous Timon of Athens. Timon prays to her to bring flames and burn the city of Athens (IV.3)